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300+ CAREER WINS - BASEBALL SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: GAYLORD PERRY, DON SUTTON, STEVE CARLTON, PHIL "KNUCKSIE" NIEKRO, WARREN SPAHN, EARLY WYNN, NOLAN RYAN, TOM "TOM TERRIFIC" SEAVER - DOCUMENT 148783

 

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BASEBALL: 300 WINS
Eight Hall of Fame pitchers sign this offcial baseball ball
Official William D. White National League Baseball signed by pitchers who have won at least 300 games: "Nolan Ryan" on the sweet-spot, "Steve Carlton", "Tom Seaver", "Phil Niekro", "Don Sutton", "Gaylord Perry", "Warren Spahn" and "Early Wynn". There's room to add future pitching greats. Fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

300+ CAREER WINS   WARREN SPAHN   EARLY WYNN   NOLAN RYAN   TOM SEAVER   GAYLORD PERRY   DON SUTTON   STEVE CARLTON   PHIL NIEKRO  


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WARREN SPAHN
Born: April 23, 1921 in Buffalo, New York
Died: November 24, 2003 in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma


Full name Warren Edward Spahn
Born April 23, 1921, Buffalo, New York
Died November 24, 2003, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
Buried at Elmwood Cemetery, Hartshorne, Oklahoma
First Game: April 19, 1942; Final Game: October 1, 1965
Bat: Left Throw: Left Height: 6' 0" Weight: 172

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1973
Named Major League Cy Young Award Winner by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1957)
Named NL Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1953, 1957 to 1958 and 1961)
Named pitcher on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1953, 1957 to 1958 and 1960)
Named pitcher on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1961)

WARREN SPAHN
This article was written by Jim Kaplan and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

The fifth-winningest pitcher of all time, Warren Spahn went 363-245 over parts of 21 years from 1942 to 1965. Only by remaining in the game two seasons too long did he fail to finish with an ERA under 3.00 (3.09) and a winning percentage over .600 (.597), and his totals are all the more impressive considering that he didn't record his first big-league victory until he was 25. Spahn should make everyone's list of the 10 best pitchers in baseball history, and was the one "sure thing" Braves fans had to cheer for through the team's final five years in Boston -- and far beyond.

Named after both President Warren G. Harding and his own father, Warren Edward Spahn was born in Buffalo, New York, on April 23, 1921, the fifth of six children and the first of two sons to Ed and Mabel Spahn. Supporting his family in the city's blue-collar East End, Ed was a $27-a-week wallpaper salesman who didn't own a car. His family ate meat maybe once a week, and his children stuffed their shoes with newspapers. A good bowler and semipro baseball player but too small at 5 feet 7 and 130 pounds to dream of a big-league career, Ed sublimated his disappointment by teaching the game to left-handed Warren, the most promising athlete in the family. Ed knew there were only so many positions open for a lefty; so just in case Warren couldn't hit well enough to play first base (his favorite position), Ed taught him exhaustively how to throw fastballs and curves from a mound he built in the backyard. "You've got to have control," Ed said over and over. "Without control you're nothing!" Warren nodded and kept dreaming of playing first in the big leagues.

"He insisted that I throw with a fluid motion, and the high leg kick was part of the deception to the hitter," Warren told Oklahoma City's Daily Oklahoman in 1998. "Hitters said the ball seemed to come out of my uniform."


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2009-2011 Prime 9 (in person), 2002 2002 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1992 The 50 Greatest Home Runs in Baseball History (Other), 1982 1982 Cracker Jack Oldtimer's Baseball Classic (in person), 1981 1981 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1976 The Way It Was (in person), 1965 I've Got a Secret (in person), 1963 Combat! (Performer), 1958 1958 World Series (in person), 1958 1958 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1957 1957 World Series (in person), 1956 1956 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1955-1958 The Ed Sullivan Show (in person), 1954 1954 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1953 1953 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1949 The Kid from Cleveland (Other), 1949 1949 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1948 1948 World Series (in person), 1947 Style of the Stars (in person)


EARLY WYNN
Born: January 6, 1920 in Hartford, Alabama
Died: April 4, 1999 in Venice, Florida


Full name Early Wynn
Born January 6, 1920, Hartford, Alabama
Died April 4, 1999, Venice, Florida
Cremated
First Game: September 13, 1939; Final Game: September 13, 1963
Bat: Both Throw: Right Height: 6' 0" Weight: 190
Bats right from 1941 to 1944

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1972
Named Major League Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1959)
Named Major League Cy Young Award Winner by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1959)
Named AL Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1959)
Named pitcher on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1959)

EARLY WYNN
This article was written by David Fleitz and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

Chicago fans were outraged when the White Sox traded their most popular player, Minnie Minoso, to Cleveland in December 1957 with Fred Hatfield for Early Wynn and Al Smith. Wynn was a 37-year-old right-handed pitcher who had posted a losing record for the Indians that season, and his best days appeared to be behind him. However, Wynn joined with Billy Pierce to give the White Sox a formidable one-two punch at the top of their rotation, and his Cy Young Award-winning performance in 1959 led the club to its first American League pennant since 1919. Four years later, at age 43, he became the 14th member of baseball's 300-win club.

Early Wynn Jr., whose family claimed Scotch-Irish and Native American descent, was born in Hartford, Alabama, on January 6, 1920, to Early Wynn Sr. and his wife, Blanche. Hartford is a small town surrounded by peanut and cotton fields in Geneva County, which borders the Florida Panhandle in the southeastern part of the state. Early Jr., whose father was an auto mechanic and a semipro ballplayer, earned 10 cents an hour hauling 500-pound bales of cotton after school. He concentrated on baseball after breaking his leg in a high school football practice, and at age 17 he traveled to Sanford, Florida, to attend a baseball camp operated by the Washington Senators. Legend has it that Early, a husky six-footer who weighed about 200 pounds, arrived at camp in his bare feet. He did not, said Early years later to writer Roger Kahn, "but I was wearing coveralls." A Washington scout, Clyde Milan, was impressed with his fastball and signed Early to a contract. The young pitcher dropped out of high school and began his professional career in 1937 with the Senators' Class D Florida State League farm team in Sanford.

After a 16-11 season in Sanford, Early advanced to the Charlotte Hornets of the Class B Piedmont League, where he remained for the next three years. The Senators gave him a trial in Washington at the end of the 1939 season, though Early was not yet ready for major-league action, going 0-2 in three games. He spent all of 1940 in Charlotte, and a good season at Springfield in the Class A Eastern League in 1941 (16-12, 2.56) brought him to Washington to stay. In 1942 he made 28 starts for the Senators, posting a 10-16 mark with a 5.12 ERA as a 22-year-old with little more than a fastball in his arsenal.


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
1959 1959 World Series (in person), 1958 1958 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1957 1957 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1956 1956 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1955 1955 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1954 1954 World Series (in person), 1949 The Kid from Cleveland (Performer)


NOLAN RYAN
Born: January 31, 1947 in Refugio, Texas

Full name Lynn Nolan Ryan
Born January 31, 1947, Refugio, Texas
First Game: September 11, 1966; Final Game: September 22, 1993
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 2" Weight: 170

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1999
Named AL Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1977)
Named right-handed pitcher on The Sporting News AL All-Star Team (1977)

NOLAN RYAN
This article was written by Talmadge Boston and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

Nolan Ryan has more strikeouts and no-hitters than any other pitcher in history. Despite never winning a Cy Young Award, he started more games than anyone except Cy Young. Though he played mostly for mediocre teams, his 324 wins are as many as contemporary Don Sutton, who pitched for four pennant winners and just missed a fifth. Yet Ryan's dominance—his 5,714 strikeouts were 2,000 more than Sutton and 1,500 better than Steve Carlton, whom he once trailed in the all-time K race—puts The Ryan Express head and shoulders above almost any other pitcher since 1970. His longevity—winning a strikeout crown and throwing a no-hitter while being the oldest player in the game at the age of 43—makes him the stuff of legend. And in one day in 1971, Ryan's change of coasts became the best trade the California Angels ever made and the worst deal in New York Mets history. He may have walked more batters and thrown more wild pitches than anyone else in the game's history, but that just proved he was human.

Born on January 31, 1947, in Refugio, Texas, Lynn Nolan Ryan was the son of Robert Ryan and Martha Lee Hancock Ryan (a descendant of John Hancock, first signer of the Declaration of Independence). The youngest of six children, he had a brother and four sisters. The Ryans moved from Refugio to Alvin, Texas, when Nolan was six weeks old because his father was transferred to the Alvin area. His father was plant supervisor at Hastings plant for Stanton Oil Company, which became Pan American Petroleum.

Nolan began playing baseball at seven with his father in their front yard. From there, the boy decided on his own that he loved playing the game and he started playing on a nearby vacant lot, where neighborhood kids built a diamond. Little League baseball had only recently come to Alvin, and it soon provided the official start to Nolan Ryan's career at Schroeder Field, where he became an all-star for the first time.


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2012 Man Caves (in person), 2012 A Baseball Love Story: The Texas Rangers (in person), 2011 The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman (in person), 2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2010-2012 Mike & Mike (in person), 2009-2011 Prime 9 (in person), 2008 Rome Is Burning (Other), 2007 Hitting from the Heart (Other), 2006 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (in person), 2002 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 1995 1995 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1993 Sunday Night Baseball (in person), 1993 Andy Griffith Show Reunion (in person), 1991 Baseball's Record Breakers (in person), 1991 Baseball 1991: A Video Yearbook (in person), 1990 This Week in Baseball 1990 (Performer), 1989 Good Morning America (in person), 1989 1989 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1986 1986 National League Championship Series (in person), 1985 1985 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1981 1981 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1980 1980 National League Championship Series (in person), 1979 1979 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1979 1979 American League Championship Series (in person), 1975 Ryan's Hope (in person), 1973 The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (in person), 1973 1973 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 1969 World Series (in person), 1969 1969 National League Championship Series (in person)


TOM SEAVER
Born: November 17, 1944 in Fresno, California

Full name George Thomas Seaver
Born November 17, 1944, Fresno, California
First Game: April 13, 1967; Final Game: September 19, 1986
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 1" Weight: 195

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1992
Named NL Cy Young Award Winner by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1969, 1973 and 1975)
Named NL Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1969 and 1975)
Named NL Rookie of the Year by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1967)
Named right-handed pitcher on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1969, 1973, 1975 and 1981)

TOM SEAVER
This article was written by Maxwell Kates and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

4,256. 755. 5,714. 511. .366.

As baseball has often been described as a game of numbers, fans, reporters, and students of the game would most certainly recognize the preceding list of significant digits. They are career accomplishments forever linked to the respective immortals Pete Rose, Hank Aaron, Nolan Ryan, Cy Young, and Ty Cobb. To that list, another number should be added to commemorate a feat of equal important to longevity in base hits, home runs, strikeouts, wins, and batting average.

98.8.

On January 7, 1992, that was the percentage by which Tom Seaver was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. No player has ever received a higher approval rating by the Baseball Writers Association of America, not even Cobb. Few players were ever more connected as a "franchise" player than Tom Terrific with the New York Mets. No member of the team was as intricately associated with their meteoric rise from cellar dwellers to world champions. Seaver was an immediate success upon arriving in New York in 1967. His miracle season of 1969 was highlighted by the game of his career against the divisional rival Chicago Cubs. He continued to pitch brilliantly in the 1970s, fanning 10 consecutive Padres in a game, collecting 200 strikeouts for nine straight seasons, and becoming the first right-hander win three Cy Young Awards. Then, at the height of Seaver's game in 1977, an ugly contract squabble led to what became known as the Midnight Massacre, a trade to the Cincinnati Reds that devastated the Mets and drove countless fans away from Shea Stadium. After five years of exile in the Queen City, Seaver returned to Queens in 1983. Although he wore socks of different color schemes toward the end of his career, he saved his final crowning achievement for the New York fans to enjoy.

George Thomas Seaver was born on November 17, 1944, in Fresno, California. His mother, Betty, was a homemaker and his father, Charles, was an executive with the Bonner Packing Company, which harvested and shipped raisins to all corners of the country. The Seavers were an athletically minded family. Charles had been a Walker Cup golfer in his youth, while swimming, volleyball, and surfing were also represented in the family.


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2013 TORC: Live on Speed (Camera / Electrical Department), 2013 2013 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2012 Studio 42 with Bob Costas (in person), 2010 The Last Play at Shea (in person), 2010 30 for 30 (Other), 2009-2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2007 The Bronx Is Burning (in person), 2003 100 Years of the World Series (Other), 2002 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 2001 Boston Red Sox: 100 Years of Baseball History (Other), 1989 An Amazin Era: Revised and u_pdated (in person), 1989 1989 National League Championship Series (in person), 1989 1989 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1986 An Amazin' Era (in person), 1983 Saturday Night Live (in person), 1982 1982 World Series (in person), 1981 1981 National League Championship Series (in person), 1981 1981 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1980 1980 World Series (in person), 1979 The American Sportsman (in person), 1979 1979 National League Championship Series (in person), 1977 1977 World Series (in person), 1977 1977 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1976 The CBS Festival of Lively Arts for Young People (in person), 1976 The CBS Festival of Lively Arts for Young People (Performer), 1976 1976 National League Championship Series (in person), 1976 1976 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1975 1975 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1973 1973 World Series (in person), 1973 1973 National League Championship Series (in person), 1973 1973 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1970 The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (in person), 1970 1970 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 The Kraft Music Hall (in person), 1969 The Joe Namath Show (in person), 1969 The Ed Sullivan Show (in person), 1969 1969 World Series (in person), 1969 1969 National League Championship Series (in person), 1968 1968 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1967 1967 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


GAYLORD PERRY
Born: September 15, 1938 in Williamston, North Carolina

Full name Gaylord Jackson Perry
Born September 15, 1938, Williamston, North Carolina
First Game: April 14, 1962; Final Game: September 21, 1983
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 4" Weight: 205
Brother of Jim Perry

GAYLORD PERRY
This article was written by Mark Armour and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1991
Named NL Cy Young Award Winner by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1978)
Named AL Cy Young Award Winner by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1972)
Named right-handed pitcher on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1978)
Named right-handed pitcher on The Sporting News AL All-Star Team (1972)

Gaylord Perry, one of the premier pitchers of his generation, won 314 games and struck out 3524 batters, but his place in baseball history rests mainly with his notorious use of the spitball, or greaseball, which defied batters, humiliated umpires, and infuriated opposing managers for two decades. But make no mistake: he was also a brilliant craftsman with several excellent pitches in his repertoire, a hurler whose mastery of the spitter provided the batter yet another thing to think about as the pitch sailed toward the plate. After the game, he sheepishly denied any wrongdoing, slyly grinning like a poker player who knows he's one step ahead of everyone else.

During Perry's career, the rules governing the enforcement of the spitball were changed twice, and the umpires were given explicit directives concerning the pitch several other times, and all this was primarily because of Gaylord Perry. When it was his day to pitch, he was the story. Where did he get his grease? Why don't the umpires stop him? Did you see what that pitch just did? Perry just kept grinning. The only time the ruckus quieted down, he reasoned, was when he was pitching poorly. The louder it got, the better he was doing. Sure, there were many other accused practitioners of the spitter during the 1960s and 1970s-good pitchers like Phil Regan, Bill Singer, Jim Maloney-but no one threw it as well, and for as long, as Gaylord Perry.

Through the years, Perry's denials became a familiar and humorous part of the show. During a playoff game in 1971, a television reporter briefly sat down with the Perry family during a game Gaylord was pitching. After a few polite questions, Allison, Perry's five-year-old daughter was asked, "Does your daddy throw a grease ball?" Not missing a beat, she responded, "It's a hard slider."


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2009-2011 Prime 9 (in person), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2000 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 1993 Baseball's Dirtiest Tricks (in person), 1983 The Late Show with David Letterman (in person), 1979 1979 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1974 1974 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1972 1972 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1971 1971 National League Championship Series (in person), 1970 1970 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1966 1966 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


DON SUTTON
Born: April 2, 1945 in Clio, Alabama

Baseball Career:
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 1" Weight: 185
First Game: April 14, 1966 ; Final Game: August 9, 1988

Awards and Achievements:
Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1998
Named NL Rookie Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1966)
Named All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (1977)
Named right-handed pitcher on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1976)


Full name Donald Howard Sutton
Born April 2, 1945, Clio, Alabama
First Game: April 14, 1966; Final Game: August 9, 1988
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 1" Weight: 185

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1998
Named NL Rookie Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1966)
Named All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (1977)
Named right-handed pitcher on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1976)



Film Credits
2010-2011 Prime 9 (in person), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2007 The Bronx Is Burning (Other), 2006 The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... (in person), 2004-2006 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (in person), 2000 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 1986 1986 American League Championship Series (in person), 1983 Just Men! (in person), 1982 1982 World Series (in person), 1982 1982 American League Championship Series (in person), 1981 Match Game PM (in person), 1981 Fantasy Island (Performer), 1979 1979 National League Championship Series (in person), 1978 1978 National League Championship Series (in person), 1977 Wonderbug (in person), 1977 1977 World Series (in person), 1977 1977 National League Championship Series (in person), 1977 1977 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1976 The Carol Burnett Show (in person), 1975 1975 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1974 1974 World Series (in person), 1974 1974 National League Championship Series (in person), 1973 Braves TBS Baseball (in person), 1973 1973 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1972 1972 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


STEVE CARLTON
Born: December 22, 1944 in Miami, Florida

Full name Steven Norman Carlton
Born December 22, 1944, Miami, Florida
First Game: April 12, 1965; Final Game: April 23, 1988
Bat: Left Throw: Left Height: 6' 4" Weight: 210

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1994
Named NL Cy Young Award Winner by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1972, 1977, 1980 and 1982)
Named NL Pitcher of the Year by The Sporting News (1972, 1977, 1980 and 1982)
Named left-handed pitcher on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1969, 1971 to 1972, 1977, 1979 to 1980 and 1982)
Won NL Gold Glove as pitcher (1981)



Film Credits
2010 Prime 9 (in person), 2009-2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2006 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (in person), 2006 DHL Presents Major League Baseball Hometown Heroes (Other), 2000 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 1996 1996 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1992 Married with Children (in person), 1986 Centennial: Over 100 Years of Philadelphia Phillies Baseball (in person), 1983 1983 World Series (in person), 1983 1983 National League Championship Series (in person), 1982 1982 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1980 1980 World Series (in person), 1980 1980 National League Championship Series (in person), 1979 1979 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1978 1978 National League Championship Series (in person), 1977 1977 National League Championship Series (in person), 1976 1976 National League Championship Series (in person), 1973 Cavalcade of Champions (in person), 1972 1972 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 1969 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1968 1968 World Series (in person), 1968 1968 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1967 1967 World Series (in person)


PHIL NIEKRO
Born: April 1, 1939 in Blaine, Ohio

Full name Philip Henry Niekro
Born April 1, 1939, Blaine, Ohio
First Game: April 15, 1964; Final Game: September 27, 1987
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 1" Weight: 180
Uncle of Lance Niekro
Brother of Joe Niekro

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1997
Won NL Gold Glove as pitcher (1978 to 1980 and 1982 to 1983)



Film Credits
2013 60 Minutes Sports (in person), 2012 Knuckleball! (in person), 2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2006 Quite Frankly with Stephen A. Smith (in person), 2006 DHL Presents Major League Baseball Hometown Heroes (Other), 2003 Late Show with David Letterman (in person), 2002 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 1982 1982 National League Championship Series (in person), 1978 1978 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 1969 National League Championship Series (in person), 1969 1969 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


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