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HANK AARON - BASEBALL SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: EDDIE MATHEWS - HFSID 135898

 

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HANK AARON & EDDIE MATHEWS
Two Hall of Famers who played together on the Milwaukee Braves sign a Rawlings Official National League Baseball.
Baseball signed: "Hank Aaron", and "Eddie Mathews". Rawlings Official National League Baseball. Hall of Famer HANK AARON played for the Braves in Milwaukee (1954-1965) and Atlanta (1966-1974). He held the record for most career home runs (755) from 1974, when he topped Babe Ruth, until 2007, when Barry Bonds edged him out to reach 762. There was much more to Hammerin' Hank however, than home runs. He also set all-time marks for the most games, at bats, total bases and RBI's; and his batting average over 23 seasons was .305-indications of the all-around ability of this quiet man from Mobile. The N.L. MVP in 1957, he appeared in a record 24 All-Star contests with the Braves (Milwaukee and Atlanta) and Brewers. In 1953, EDDIE MATHEWS (1931-2001), a future member of the 500 HR Club hit 47 homers for the Milwaukee Braves, establishing a single-season record for third basemen (since broken by Mike Schmidt) as he won the National League home run title. Mathews played for World Championship teams in Milwaukee (1957) and Detroit (1968), and on another pennant winner, the 1957 Braves. (Aaron, of course, was on those Braves teams too.) Mathews was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978. Fine condition.


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HANK AARON   EDDIE MATHEWS  


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HANK AARON
Born: February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama

Full name Henry Louis Aaron
Born February 5, 1934, Mobile, Alabama
First Game: April 13, 1954;
Final Game: October 3, 1976
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 0" Weight: 180
Brother of Tommie Aaron

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1982
Named NL Most Valuable Player by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1957)
Named NL Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1956 and 1963)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1956 and 1958 to 1959)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1963, 1965, 1967 and 1969 to 1971)
Won NL Gold Glove as right fielder (1958 to 1960)

HANK AARON
This article was written by Bill Johnson and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

"Henry Aaron in the second inning walked and scored. He's sittin' on 714. Here's the pitch by Downing. Swinging. There's a drive into left-center field! That ball is gonna be ... outta here! It's gone! It's 715! There's a new home run champion of all time, and it's Henry Aaron!"  - Milo Hamilton, April 8, 1974

With that swing of the bat, along with the 714 that preceded it, Hank Aaron not only passed Babe Ruth as Major League Baseball's career home run leader, but he also made a giant leap in the integration of the game and the nation. Aaron, an African-American, had broken a record set by the immortal Ruth, and not just any record, but the all-time major league home run record, and in doing so moved the game and the nation forward on the journey started by Jackie Robinson in 1947. By 1974 Aaron's baseball career was within three years of sunset, but the road he'd travelled to arrive at that spring evening in Atlanta had hardened and tempered him, perhaps irrevocably, in ways that only suffering can produce.  Aaron finally shrugged off the twin burdens of expectation and fear that evening, and few have ever stood taller.

Henry Louis Aaron was born February 5, 1934, in Mobile Alabama, to Herbert and Estella (Pritchett) Aaron. Among Henry's seven siblings was a brother, Tommie, who later played in parts of seven different seasons in the major leagues. For whatever such records are worth, the brothers still hold the record for most career home runs by a pair of siblings, 768, with the elder Henry contributing 755 to Tommie's 13. They were also the first siblings to appear in a League Championship Series as teammates.


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2013 Conan (in person), 2011 Late Show with David Letterman (in person), 2010-2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2010 Stand Up to Cancer (in person), 2009 Prime 9 (in person), 2008 Bigger Stronger Faster* (Other), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2007 Rome Is Burning (Other), 2006 ESPN Outside the Lines Nightly (Other), 2006 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (in person), 2006 Costas Now (Other), 2005-2006 The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... (in person), 2003 Pete Rose on Trial (in person), 2003 100 Years of the World Series (in person), 2002 Jim Brown: All American (in person), 2002 Futurama (in person), 2002 2002 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2001 Summer Catch (in person), 2000-2004 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 2000 When It Was a Game 3 (in person), 2000 2000 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1999 ABC 2000: The Millennium (in person), 1997 Arli$$ (in person), 1995 The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (in person), 1995 Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream (Other), 1995 Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream (Other), 1994 Baseball (Other), 1993 Late Night with Conan O'Brien (in person), 1992 When It Was a Game 2 (Other), 1992 The 50 Greatest Home Runs in Baseball History (Other), 1992 Clash of the Champions XX: 20th Anniversary (in person), 1991 When It Was a Game (Other), 1991 Baseball's Record Breakers (in person), 1991 Baseball's Greatest Moments (in person), 1991 1991 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1990 Night of 100 Stars III (in person), 1989 The Arsenio Hall Show (in person), 1989 Mr. Belvedere (in person), 1987 The Incredible Ida Early (in person), 1987 MacGyver (in person), 1986 Liberty Weekend (in person), 1983 1983 Cracker Jack Oldtimer's Baseball Classic (in person), 1982-1986 The Late Show with David Letterman (in person), 1980 Happy Days (in person), 1978 Good Morning America (in person), 1977 The Cry of a Hurting World... I'm Hungry! (in person), 1977 Jimmy Carter's Inaugural Gala (in person), 1975 Tony Orlando and Dawn (in person), 1975 1975 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1974 The Dean Martin Comedy Hour (in person), 1974 Dinah! (in person), 1974 1974 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1973 Flip (in person), 1973 1973 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1972 1972 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1971 1971 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1970 1970 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 1969 National League Championship Series (in person), 1969 1969 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1968 1968 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1967 1967 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1966 1966 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1965 1965 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1964 1964 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1963 1963 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1960 Home Run Derby (in person), 1958 1958 World Series (in person), 1958 1958 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1957 The Steve Allen Plymouth Show (in person), 1957 Captain Kangaroo (in person), 1957 1957 World Series (in person), 1957 1957 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1956-1958 The Ed Sullivan Show (in person), 1956 1956 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1955 1955 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


EDDIE MATHEWS
Born: October 13, 1931 in Texarkana, Texas
Died: February 18, 2001 in La Jolla, California


Full name Edwin Lee Mathews
Born October 13, 1931, Texarkana, Texas
Died February 18, 2001, La Jolla, California
Buried at Santa Barbara Cemetery, Santa Barbara, California (Ocean View Triangle, Lot 151, South Half Quadrant, Grave 5)
First Game: April 15, 1952; Final Game: September 27, 1968
Managed First Game: August 7, 1972; Managed Final Game: July 21, 1974
Bat: Left Throw: Right Height: 6' 1" Weight: 190

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1978
Named third baseman on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1955, 1957 and 1959 to 1960)

EDDIE MATHEWS
This article was written by David Fleitz and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

Eddie Mathews played in only 31 games for the Tigers in 1968, batting .212 with three home runs, but his contribution to that championship season far outweighed his statistics. Mathews, who arrived in Detroit in 1967 after a long and illustrious career in the National League, had led the Milwaukee Braves to two pennants and the 1957 World Series title. This respected veteran provided a much-needed dose of leadership to the Tigers, only a handful of whom had ever played in a Series. When Mathews retired as a player after the 1968 World Series, he stood in sixth place on baseball's career home run list with 512 and held the all-time record for games played by a third baseman. Ten years later, he became the first member of the 1968 championship team to gain election to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Edwin Lee Mathews Jr. was born in Texarkana, Texas, on October 13, 1931. His parents moved the family to Santa Barbara, California, four years later. Eddie inherited a passion for baseball from his father, a Western Union telegraph operator and former semipro athlete, though his mother participated as well. "My mother used to pitch to me, and my father would shag balls," he recalled many years later. "If I hit one up the middle close to my mother, I'd have some extra chores to do. My mother was instrumental in making me a pull hitter."

He excelled in football and baseball at Santa Barbara High and received college scholarship offers in football, but his prowess as a third baseman and a left-handed hitter stamped him as one of the most sought-after baseball prospects in the nation. Eddie and his parents weighed offers from several major league teams during his senior year. Mathews' autobiography explains how the rules then stated a player could not be signed until he graduated from high school. To be safe, Eddie and Boston Braves scout Johnny Moore waited until midnight on the night of his graduation in June 1949 and signed the contract a few minutes after midnight. Mathews got a $6,000 bonus. Several other teams had offered more money, but Eddie and his father had studied major league rosters and determined that the Braves, with aging third baseman Bob Elliott, would likely have an opening at that position a few years down the road.


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2010-2011 Prime 9 (Other), 1995 Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream (in person), 1978 1978 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1974 The Dean Martin Comedy Hour (in person), 1968 1968 World Series (in person), 1960 Home Run Derby (in person), 1958 The Ed Sullivan Show (in person), 1958 1958 World Series (in person), 1957 1957 World Series (in person), 1957 1957 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1955 1955 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1953 1953 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


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