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HANK AARON - PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: WILLIE "SAY HEY KID" MAYS - HFSID 158773

 
HANK AARON and WILLIE MAYS
Color publicity photograph of the baseball legends in their uniforms posing on the field
Photograph signed: "Willie Mays" and "Hank Aaron" Color, 8x10. Considered by many the greatest player of all time, WILLIE MAYS (b. 1931) was the prototype of the complete player; he hit for average and power, ran the bases with intelligence and speed, played a spectacular centerfield and possessed a great arm. He was also remarkably durable, playing in at least 150 games for 13 consecutive seasons. Mays was an All-Star from 1954-1973, he received the Most Valuable Player Award in 1954 and 1965 and the Gold Glove from 1957-1968.  He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979. On May 4, 1966, Mays passed Mel Ott's 19-year-old record of 511 National League home runs and finished his career with a total of 660, ranking him third on the all-time list behind Henry Aaron's 755 and Babe Ruth's 714 (he is now in fourth place after Ruth's record was broken by his Godson, Barry Bonds, in 2006). He retired with a .302 batting average. Hall of Famer HANK AARON (b. 1934) played for the Braves in Milwaukee (1954-1965) and Atlanta (1966-1974). From 1974 to 2007, he held the record for most career home runs (755), surpassing Babe Ruth's old record of 714 and finally edged out by Barry Bonds' 762. Aaron is synonymous with home runs, but there was much more to Hammerin' Hank than his 755 round-trippers. He also set all-time marks for the most games, at bats, total bases and RBIs, and his batting average over 23 seasons was .305 - indications of the all-around ability of this quiet man from Mobile. The NL MVP in 1957, he appeared in a record 24 All-Star contests with the Braves (Milwaukee and Atlanta) and Brewers. Ink note on verso (no show-through). Mays signature slightly smudged at "lie". Otherwise, fine condition.


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HANK AARON   WILLIE MAYS  


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HANK AARON
Born: February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama

Full name Henry Louis Aaron
Born February 5, 1934, Mobile, Alabama
First Game: April 13, 1954;
Final Game: October 3, 1976
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 6' 0" Weight: 180
Brother of Tommie Aaron

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1982
Named NL Most Valuable Player by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1957)
Named NL Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1956 and 1963)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1956 and 1958 to 1959)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1963, 1965, 1967 and 1969 to 1971)
Won NL Gold Glove as right fielder (1958 to 1960)

HANK AARON
This article was written by Bill Johnson and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

"Henry Aaron in the second inning walked and scored. He's sittin' on 714. Here's the pitch by Downing. Swinging. There's a drive into left-center field! That ball is gonna be ... outta here! It's gone! It's 715! There's a new home run champion of all time, and it's Henry Aaron!"  - Milo Hamilton, April 8, 1974

With that swing of the bat, along with the 714 that preceded it, Hank Aaron not only passed Babe Ruth as Major League Baseball's career home run leader, but he also made a giant leap in the integration of the game and the nation. Aaron, an African-American, had broken a record set by the immortal Ruth, and not just any record, but the all-time major league home run record, and in doing so moved the game and the nation forward on the journey started by Jackie Robinson in 1947. By 1974 Aaron's baseball career was within three years of sunset, but the road he'd travelled to arrive at that spring evening in Atlanta had hardened and tempered him, perhaps irrevocably, in ways that only suffering can produce.  Aaron finally shrugged off the twin burdens of expectation and fear that evening, and few have ever stood taller.

Henry Louis Aaron was born February 5, 1934, in Mobile Alabama, to Herbert and Estella (Pritchett) Aaron. Among Henry's seven siblings was a brother, Tommie, who later played in parts of seven different seasons in the major leagues. For whatever such records are worth, the brothers still hold the record for most career home runs by a pair of siblings, 768, with the elder Henry contributing 755 to Tommie's 13. They were also the first siblings to appear in a League Championship Series as teammates.


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2013 Conan (in person), 2011 Late Show with David Letterman (in person), 2010-2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2010 Stand Up to Cancer (in person), 2009 Prime 9 (in person), 2008 Bigger Stronger Faster* (Other), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2007 Rome Is Burning (Other), 2006 ESPN Outside the Lines Nightly (Other), 2006 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (in person), 2006 Costas Now (Other), 2005-2006 The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... (in person), 2003 Pete Rose on Trial (in person), 2003 100 Years of the World Series (in person), 2002 Jim Brown: All American (in person), 2002 Futurama (in person), 2002 2002 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2001 Summer Catch (in person), 2000-2004 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 2000 When It Was a Game 3 (in person), 2000 2000 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1999 ABC 2000: The Millennium (in person), 1997 Arli$$ (in person), 1995 The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (in person), 1995 Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream (Other), 1995 Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream (Other), 1994 Baseball (Other), 1993 Late Night with Conan O'Brien (in person), 1992 When It Was a Game 2 (Other), 1992 The 50 Greatest Home Runs in Baseball History (Other), 1992 Clash of the Champions XX: 20th Anniversary (in person), 1991 When It Was a Game (Other), 1991 Baseball's Record Breakers (in person), 1991 Baseball's Greatest Moments (in person), 1991 1991 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1990 Night of 100 Stars III (in person), 1989 The Arsenio Hall Show (in person), 1989 Mr. Belvedere (in person), 1987 The Incredible Ida Early (in person), 1987 MacGyver (in person), 1986 Liberty Weekend (in person), 1983 1983 Cracker Jack Oldtimer's Baseball Classic (in person), 1982-1986 The Late Show with David Letterman (in person), 1980 Happy Days (in person), 1978 Good Morning America (in person), 1977 The Cry of a Hurting World... I'm Hungry! (in person), 1977 Jimmy Carter's Inaugural Gala (in person), 1975 Tony Orlando and Dawn (in person), 1975 1975 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1974 The Dean Martin Comedy Hour (in person), 1974 Dinah! (in person), 1974 1974 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1973 Flip (in person), 1973 1973 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1972 1972 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1971 1971 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1970 1970 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 1969 National League Championship Series (in person), 1969 1969 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1968 1968 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1967 1967 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1966 1966 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1965 1965 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1964 1964 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1963 1963 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1960 Home Run Derby (in person), 1958 1958 World Series (in person), 1958 1958 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1957 The Steve Allen Plymouth Show (in person), 1957 Captain Kangaroo (in person), 1957 1957 World Series (in person), 1957 1957 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1956-1958 The Ed Sullivan Show (in person), 1956 1956 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1955 1955 MLB All-Star Game (in person)


WILLIE MAYS
Born: May 6, 1931 in Westfield, Alabama

Baseball Career:
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 5' 10.5" Weight: 170
First Game: May 25, 1951 ; Final Game: September 9, 1973

Awards and Achievements:
Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1979
Named NL Most Valuable Player by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1954 and 1965)
Named Major League Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1954)
Named NL Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1954 and 1965)
Named NL Rookie of the Year by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1951)
Named NL Rookie of the Year by The Sporting News (1951)
Named All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (1963 and 1968)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1954 and 1957 to 1960)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1961 to 1966)
Won Major League Gold Glove as center fielder (1957)
Won NL Gold Glove as center fielder (1958 to 1960)
Won NL Gold Glove as outfielder (1961 to 1968)


Full name Willie Howard Mays
Born May 6, 1931, Westfield, Alabama
First Game: May 25, 1951; Final Game: September 9, 1973
Bat: Right Throw: Right Height: 5' 10.5" Weight: 170

Selected to the Hall of Fame in 1979
Named NL Most Valuable Player by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1954 and 1965)
Named Major League Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1954)
Named NL Player of the Year by The Sporting News (1954 and 1965)
Named NL Rookie of the Year by Baseball Writers' Association of America (1951)
Named NL Rookie of the Year by The Sporting News (1951)
Named All-Star Game Most Valuable Player (1963 and 1968)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team (1954 and 1957 to 1960)
Named outfielder on The Sporting News NL All-Star Team (1961 to 1966)
Won Major League Gold Glove as center fielder (1957)
Won NL Gold Glove as center fielder (1958 to 1960)
Won NL Gold Glove as outfielder (1961 to 1968)

WILLIE MAYS
This article was written by John Saccoman and is presented in part, courtesy of the Society for American Baseball Research

If somebody came up and hit .450, stole 100 bases, and performed a miracle in the field every day, I'd still look you right in the eye and tell you that Willie was better. He could do the five things you have to do to be a superstar: hit, hit with power, run, throw and field. And he had the other magic ingredient that turns a superstar into a super Superstar. Charisma. He lit up a room when he came in. He was a joy to be around.
--Leo Durocher, Mays's first manager, Nice Guys Finish Last

Many contemporaries agree with Leo Durocher's assessment of Willie Mays as the best all-around player in baseball history. Monte Irvin, Willie's roommate in his early days with the Giants, said, "I think anybody who saw him will tell you that Mays is the greatest ballplayer that ever lived." Stan Musial, Mays's fellow 1950s immortal, echoes these sentiments, saying, "Willie ranks with DiMaggio as the best I ever saw. He's the perfect ballplayer too. Mays can beat a club with his bat, his glove, his arm and his legs."

In baseball's never ending attempts to somehow order its gods, Mays is the only contender whose proponents rarely use statistics to make their case. It is as if Mays's 660 home runs and 3,283 base hits somehow sell the man short, that his wonderful playing record is almost beside the point. With Mays it is not merely what he did -- but how he did it. He scored more than 2,000 runs, nearly all of them, it would seem, after losing his cap flying around third base. He is credited with more than 7000 outfield putouts, most exciting, some spectacular, a few breathtaking. How do you measure that? An artist and a genius, for most of his 23 seasons in the big leagues, you simply could not keep your eyes off Willie Mays.

The great ballplayer's father, William Howard Mays, was named after William Howard Taft, who was the United States president when he was born in 1912. The elder Mays worked in the steel mills of Westfield, Alabama, outside Birmingham. Nicknamed "Kitty-Kat" or "Cat," he was a semipro baseball player for the Westfield entry in the Tennessee Coal and Iron League. Cat's father, Willie's grand-father, Walter Mays, was a sharecropper and pitcher. Cat's wife, the former Anna Sattlewhite, was a high school track star. Willie once wrote, "[She] held a couple of women's track records in that part of the country."


To read this article in its entirety, please click here

Interested in Baseball? If so, we strongly recommend that you visit and join the Society for American Baseball Research

Film Credits
2011 Prime 9 (Other), 2010 The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (in person), 2010 Charlie Rose (in person), 2010 A Hall for Heroes: The Inaugural Hall of Fame Induction of 1939 (Other), 2009-2011 Prime 9 (in person), 2008 2008 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2007 2007 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 2006 The Republic of Baseball: The Dominican Giants of the American (in person), 2006 Costas Now (in person), 2005 The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... (in person), 2005 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (in person), 2005 ESPN 25: Who's #1 (Other), 2003 The Curse of the Bambino (Other), 2003 ESPN SportsCentury (Other), 2003 100 Years of the World Series (in person), 2000-2004 ESPN SportsCentury (in person), 2000 Michael Jordan to the Max (in person), 2000 Joe DiMaggio: The Final Chapter (in person), 2000 Here's to You, Charlie Brown: 50 Great Years (in person), 1999 Summer of Sam (Other), 1999 ABC 2000: The Millennium (in person), 1998 Up Close Primetime (in person), 1997 The Fifties (Other), 1993 Comic Relief: Baseball Relief '93 (in person), 1992 The 50 Greatest Home Runs in Baseball History (Other), 1992 Malcolm X (Other), 1992 1992 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1991 When It Was a Game (Other), 1991 This Week in Baseball's Greatest Plays (in person), 1990 The Golden Decade of Baseball (in person), 1990 Baseball's Greatest Hits (in person), 1989 My Two Dads (in person), 1989 Mr. Belvedere (in person), 1987 A Giants History: The Tale of Two Cities (in person), 1985 When Nature Calls (in person), 1977 1977 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1974-1976 The Way It Was (in person), 1974 Today (in person), 1974 Dinah! (in person), 1973 1973 World Series (in person), 1973 1973 National League Championship Series (in person), 1973 1973 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1972 The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie (in person), 1972 1972 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1971 1971 National League Championship Series (in person), 1971 1971 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1970 Della (in person), 1970 1970 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1969 The Joey Bishop Show (in person), 1969 The Joe Namath Show (in person), 1969 1969 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1968 1968 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1967 All-Star Benefit Celebrity Baseball Game (in person), 1967 1967 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1966 Bewitched (in person), 1966 1966 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1965-1970 The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (in person), 1965 1965 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1964-1967 The Hollywood Palace (in person), 1964-1966 The Donna Reed Show (in person), 1964 1964 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1963 A Man Named Mays (in person), 1963 1963 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1962 1962 World Series (in person), 1960 World Wide '60 (Other), 1960 Home Run Derby (in person), 1958 The Steve Allen Plymouth Show (in person), 1958 The Jack Paar Tonight Show (in person), 1958 1958 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1957 1957 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1956 The NBC Comedy Hour (in person), 1956 1956 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1955-1957 The Ed Sullivan Show (in person), 1955 1955 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1954-1962 What's My Line (in person), 1954 Tonight! (in person), 1954 The Colgate Comedy Hour (in person), 1954 The Colgate Comedy Hour (Sound), 1954 1954 World Series (in person), 1954 1954 MLB All-Star Game (in person), 1951 1951 World Series (in person)


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