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Print Document Description  Print this page Questions about authenticity? Click Here

SKYLAB SPACE STATION - MAGAZINE SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: CAPTAIN PAUL J. WEITZ, COLONEL JACK LOUSMA, CAPTAIN JOSEPH KERWIN, COLONEL GERALD P. "JERRY" CARR, COLONEL WILLIAM R. "BILL" POGUE, CAPTAIN ALAN L. BEAN, OWEN K. GARRIOTT - DOCUMENT 289777
 

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SKYLAB: JACK LOUSMA, PAUL WEITZ, JOE KERWIN, JERRY CARR, BILL POGUE, OWEN GARRIOTT and ALAN BEAN
Sixty-page reprint of a National Geographic issue devoted to the Skylab Space Station, signed by the mission astronauts on a spectacular 2-page color photo. From the personal collection of Jack Lousma!
Magazine signed: "Jack Lousma", "Paul Weitz", "Joe Kerwin", "Jerry Carr", "Bill Pogue, "Owen Garriott", "Alan L Bean" and on back cover "From my personal collection/Jack Lousma", 60 pages, 7x10. Reprint of an article by Thomas Y. Canby originally published in the National Geographic in October 1974. Also contains two autopen signatures: Charles Conrad, Jr. and Ed Gibson. The Skylab orbiting space station was launched on May 14, 1973. On May 25th, the first Skylab crew, confusingly called the Skylab 2 mission, was launched, returning to Earth on June 22, 1973. It made repairs to Skylab, and conducted medical experiments. PAUL WEITZ was the pilot on this mission He would later command STS-6 (April 4, 1983 to April 9, 1983), the maiden flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger. JOE KERWIN, a medical doctor, was the science pilot on this mission. Charles Conrad, Jr. (1930-1999), who had walked on the moon in 1969, was the third member of the Skylab 2 team. The Skylab 3 mission performed systems and operational tests and thermal shield deployment (July 28-September 25, 1973). JACK LOUSMA, an aeronautical engineer and Marine recon pilot, was the pilot of Skylab-3, performing 11 hours of space walk on that mission. In March 1982, Lousma flew the space shuttle on its final orbital test flight. In 1984 he narrowly lost a bid for a US Senate seat from Michigan. ALAN BEAN (1932-1999) was Lunar Module Pilot on Apollo 12 in November 1969, and the fourth man to walk on the Moon. Bean was Spacecraft Commander of Skylab 3. OWEN GARRIOTT, an electrical engineer, traveled to Skylab on this mission and spent a then record 60 days in space aboard the station, conducting repairs while studying the sun, the earth's resources, and the effects of prolonged weightlessness. In 1983, he made a 10-day flight aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. Skylab 4 (November 16, 1973-February 8, 1974 successfully completed 56 experiments, 26 science demonstrations, 15 subsystem-detailed objectives and 13 student investigations during their 1,214 revolutions of the Earth. GERALD P. "JERRY" CARR (b. 1932) was commander of this third and final manned visit to the Skylab Orbital Workshop. WILLIAM "BILL" POGUE, a Korean War veteran and a former member of the Air Force Thunderbirds, was a member of the astronaut support crews for Apollo missions 7, 11 and 14. He was the pilot on the Skylab-4 mission. Edward Gibson was the third member of this last Skylab crew. Fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

SKYLAB SPACE STATION   CAPTAIN PAUL J. WEITZ   COLONEL JACK LOUSMA   CAPTAIN JOSEPH KERWIN   COLONEL GERALD P. CARR   COLONEL WILLIAM R. POGUE   CAPTAIN ALAN L. BEAN   OWEN K. GARRIOTT  


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CAPTAIN PAUL J. WEITZ
Born: July 25, 1932 in Erie, Pennsylvania

Paul J. Weitz (pronounced WHITES)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born in Erie, Pennsylvania, on July 25, 1932. Married to the former Suzanne M. Berry of Harborcreek, Pennsylvania. Two children: Matthew and Cynthia. Hunting and fishing are among his hobbies. His mother, Mrs. Violet Futrell, now resides in Norfolk, Virginia.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Harborcreek High School in Harborcreek, Pennsylvania; received a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 1954 and a master's degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, in 1964.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow, American Astronautical Association.

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, Astronaut Wings, Air Medal (5 awards), and Commendation Medal (for combat flights in Vietnam), the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce Kitty Hawk Award (1973), the Robert J. Collier Trophy for 1973 (1974), the Pennsylvania State University Alumni Association's Distinguished Alumni Award, named a Pennsylvania State University Alumni Fellow (1974), the AIAA Haley Astronautics Award for 1974, the Federation Aeronautique Internationale's V. M. Komarov Diploma for 1973 (1974), the Dr. Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy for 1975, the 1974 Harmon International Aviation Trophy for Astronaut (1975), NASA Space Flight Medal (1983), the 1984 Harmon International Award (1989).

EXPERIENCE: Weitz received his commission as an ensign through the NROTC program at Pennsylvania State University. He served for one year at sea aboard a destroyer before going to flight training and was awarded his wings in September 1956. He served in various naval squadrons until he was selected as an astronaut in 1966. He has logged more than 7,700 hours flying time--6,400 hours in jet aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Mr. Weitz is one of the 19 astronauts selected by NASA in April 1966. He served as pilot on the crew of Skylab-2 (SL-2), which launched on May 25 and ended on June 22, 1973. SL-2 was the first manned Skylab mission, and activated a 28-day flight. In logging 672 hours and 49 minutes aboard the orbital workshop, the crew established what was then a new world record for a single mission. Mr. Weitz also logged 2 hours and 11 minutes in extravehicular activities.

Mr. Weitz was spacecraft commander on the crew of STS-6, which launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on April 4, 1983. This was the maiden voyage of the Orbiter Challenger. During the mission, the crew conducted numerous experiments in materials processing, recorded lightning activities, deployed IUS/TDRS-A, conducted spectacular extravehicular activity while testing a variety of support systems and equipment in preparation for future space walks, and also carried three "Getaway Specials." Mission duration was 120 hours before landing Challenger on a concrete runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on April 9, 1983. With the completion of this flight, Paul Weitz logged a total of 793 hours in space.

Mr. Weitz was Deputy Director of the Johnson Space Center when he retired from NASA service in May 1994.




COLONEL JACK LOUSMA
Born: February 29, 1936 in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Jack Robert Lousma (Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born February 29, 1936, in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Lousma and his wife, Gratia Kay, have been married since 1956. They have four children and six grandchildren. He is a golfing enthusiast and enjoys hunting, fishing, and aviation.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Ann Arbor High School in Ann Arbor, Michigan; received a bachelor of science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Michigan in 1959, and a master of science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the U. S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1965; presented an honorary doctorate of Astronautical Science from the University of Michigan in 1973, an honorary Doctor of Science from Hope College in 1982, and an honorary Doctor of Science in Business Administration from Cleary College in 1986.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow of the American Astronautical Society; member of the Society of the Sigma Xi, the University of Michigan "M" Club, the Officer's Christian Fellowship, and the Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded the Johnson Space Center Certificate of Commendation (1970) and the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1973); presented the Navy Distinguished Service Medal and the Navy Astronaut Wings (1974), the City of Chicago Gold Medal (1974), the Robert J. Collier Trophy for 1973 (1974), the Marine Corps Aviation Association's Exceptional Achievement Award (1974), the Federation Aeronautique Internationale's V. M. Komarov Diploma for 1973 (1974), the Dr. Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy for 1975 (1975), the AIAA Octave Chanute Award for 1975 (1975), the AAS Flight Achievement Award for 1974 (1975); inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame (1982). NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1982), Department of Defense Distinguished Service Medal (1982), NCAA Silver Anniversary Award (1983). Inducted into the Michigan Aviation Hall of Fame (1988).

EXPERIENCE: Lousma was a reconnaissance pilot with VMCJ-2, 2nd Marine Air Wing, at Cherry Point, North Carolina, before being assigned to Houston and the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. He became a Marine Corps officer in 1959 and received his wings in 1960 after completing training at the U.S. Naval Air Training Command. He was then assigned to VMA-224, 2nd Marine Air Wing, as an attack pilot and later served with VMA-224, 1st Marine Air Wing, at Iwakuni, Japan. He has logged 7000 hours of flight time--including 700 hours in general aviation aircraft and 1619 hours in space, 4,500 hours in jet aircraft, 240 hours in helicopters, and 700 hours in general aviation aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Lousma is one of the 19 astronauts selected by NASA in April 1966. He served as a member of the astronaut support crews for the Apollo 9, 10, and 13 missions. He was the pilot for Skylab-3 (July 28 to September 25, 1973) and was spacecraft commander on STS-3 (March 22-30, 1982), logging a total of over 1,619 hours in space. Lousma also spent 11 hours on two spacewalks outside the Skylab space station. He also served as backup docking module pilot of the United States flight crew for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) mission which was completed successfully in July 1975.

Jack Lousma left NASA in 1983.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: Skylab-3 (SL-3) (July 28 to September 25, 1973). The crew on this 59-1/2 day flight included Alan L. Bean (spacecraft commander), Jack Lousma (pilot), and Owen K. Garriott (science-pilot). SL-3 accomplished 150% of mission goals while completing 858 revolutions of the earth and traveling some 24,400,000 miles in earth orbit. The crew installed six replacement rate gyros used for attitude control of the spacecraft and a twin-pole sun-shade used for thermal control, and they repaired nine major experiment or operational equipment items. They devoted 305 man hours to extensive solar observations from above the earth's atmosphere, which included viewing two major solar flares and numerous smaller flares and coronal transients. Also acquired and returned to earth were 16,000 photographs and 18 miles of magnetic tape documenting earth resources observations. The crew completed 333 medical experiment performances and obtained valuable data on the effects of extended weightlessness on humans. Skylab-3 ended with a Pacific Ocean splashdown and recovery by the USS NEW ORLEANS.

STS-3, the third orbital test flight of space shuttle Columbia, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on March 22, 1982, into a 180-mile circular orbit above the earth. Jack Lousma was the spacecraft commander and C. Gordon Fullerton was the pilot on this 8-day mission. Major flight test objectives included exposing the Columbia to extremes in thermal stress and the first use of the 50-foot remote manipulator system (RMS) to grapple and maneuver a payload in space. The crew also operated several scientific experiments in the orbiter's cabin and on the OSS-1 pallet in the payload bay. Space Shuttle Columbia responded favorably to the thermal tests and was found to be better than expected as a scientific platform. The crew accomplished almost 100% of the objectives assigned to STS-3, and after a 1-day delay due to bad weather, landed on the lakebed at White Sands, New Mexico, on March 30,1982, having traveled 3.4 million miles during 129.9 orbits of the earth. Mission duration was 192 hours, 4 minutes, 49 seconds.



Film Credits
2011 iN Deep (in person), 2009 NASA: Triumph and Tragedy (in person)


CAPTAIN JOSEPH KERWIN
Born: February 19, 1932 in Oak Park, Illinois

Joseph P. Kerwin, M.D. (Captain, Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born February 19, 1932, in Oak Park, Illinois. Married to the former Shirley Ann Good of Danville, Pennsylvania. They have three daughters, and three grandchildren. His hobbies are reading and classical music.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Fenwick High School, Oak Park, Illinois, in 1949; received a bachelor of arts degree in Philosophy from College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1953; a doctor of Medicine degree from Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois, in 1957; completed internship at the District of Columbia General Hospital in Washington, D.C.; and attended the U.S. Navy School of Aviation Medicine at Pensacola, Florida, being designated a naval flight surgeon in December 1958.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association; member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

EXPERIENCE: Kerwin, a Captain, has been in the Navy Medical Corps since July 1958. He earned his wings at Beeville, Texas, in 1962.

He has logged 4,500 hours flying time.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Captain Kerwin was selected as a scientist-astronaut by NASA in June 1965.

Kerwin served as science-pilot for the Skylab 2 (SL-2) mission which launched on May 25 and terminated on June 22, 1973. With him for the initial activation and 28-day flight qualification operations of the Skylab orbital workshop were Charles Conrad, Jr., (spacecraft commander) and Paul J. Weitz (pilot).

Kerwin was subsequently in charge of the on-orbit branch of the Astronaut Office, where he coordinated astronaut activity involving rendezvous, satellite deployment and retrieval, and other Shuttle payload operations.

From 1982-1983, Kerwin served as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's senior science representative in Australia. In this capacity, he served as liaison between NASA's Office of Space Tracking and Data Systems and Australia's Department of Science and Technology.

From 1984-1987, he served as Director, Space and Life Sciences, Johnson Space Center. Kerwin was responsible for direction and coordination of medical support to operational manned spacecraft programs, including health care and maintenance of the astronauts and their families; for direction of life services, supporting research and light experiment project; and for managing JSC earth sciences and scientific efforts in lunar and planetary research.

He retired from the Navy, left NASA and joined Lockheed in 1987.

At Lockheed he managed the Extravehicular Systems Project, providing hardware for Space Station Freedom, from 1988 to 1990; with two other Lockheed employees he invented the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER), recently tested for use by space walking astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS). He then served on the Assured Crew Return Vehicle team, and served as Study Manager on the Human Transportation Study, a NASA review of future space transportation architectures. In 1994-95 he led the Houston liaison group for Lockheed Martin's FGB contract, the procurement of the Russian "space tug" which has become the first element of the ISS. He served on the NASA Advisory Council from 1990 to 1993.

He joined Systems Research Laboratories (SRL) in June, 1996, to serve as Program Manager of the SRL team which bid to win the Medical Support and Integration Contract at the Johnson Space Center. The incumbent, KRUG Life Sciences, was selected. Then, to his surprise, KRUG recruited him to replace its retiring President, T. Wayne Holt. He joined KRUG on April 1, 1997.

On March 16, 1998, KRUG Life Sciences became the Life Sciences Special Business Unit of Wyle Laboratories of El Segundo, California.

In addition to his duties at Wyle, he serves on the Board of Directors of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as an Industry representative.




COLONEL GERALD P. CARR
Born: August 22, 1932 in Denver, Colorado

GERALD P. CARR (Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, Retired)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born in Denver, Colorado, on August 22, 1932, but raised in Santa Ana, California, which he considers his hometown. Divorced. Remarried in 1979 to Dr. Patricia L. Musick. Three daughters and three sons. Recreational interests include snorkeling, swimming, bird hunting, fishing and woodworking.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Santa Ana High School, Santa Ana, California; received a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Southern California in 1954, A Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1961, and a Master of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Princeton University in 1962; also presented an Honorary Doctorate of Science, Aeronautical Engineering, from Parks College of Saint Louis University, Cahokia, Illinois, in 1976.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow of the American Astronautical Society; a former Director of the Sunsat Energy Council; a former Director of the Houston POPS Orchestra; a Director of the National Space Society; the Marine Corps Association and the Marine Corps Aviation Association; The Naval Aviation Museum Foundation; Society of Experimental Test Pilots; The Order of Daedalians; National Society of Professional Engineers; University of Southern California Alumni Association, and Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity.

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded the National Defense Service Medal; Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal; Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal, and a letter of Commendation from the Commander of Carrier Division II; received the NASA Group Achievement Award, 1971; NASA Distinguished Service Medal, 1974; Navy Distinguished Service Medal and the Navy Astronaut Wings; 1974; City of Chicago Gold Medal, 1974; University of Southern California Alumni Merit Award, 1974; Boy Scouts of America Distinguished Eagle Scout Award, 1974; Robert J. Collier Trophy for 1973, in 1974; City of New York Gold Medal, 1974; Marine corps Aviation Association's Exceptional Achievement Award, 1974; Dr. Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy, 1975; also recipient of the Federation Aeronautique Internationale's Gold Space Medal; De La Vaulx Medal, and V. M. Komarov Diploma for 1974; AIAA Haley Astronautics Award for 1974; and the American Astronautical Society's 1975 Flight Achievement Award. Inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame, 1997.

EXPERIENCE: When informed by NASA of his selection for astronaut training, he was assigned to the test directors section of Marine Air Control Squadron Three, a unit responsible for the testing and evaluation of the Marine Tactical Data System.

Carr began his military career in 1949 with the Navy, and in 1950 he was appointed a midshipman (NROTC) and enrolled in the University of Southern California. Upon graduation in 1954, he received his commission and subsequently reported to the U.S. Marine Corps Officers' Basic School at Quantico, Virginia. He received flight training at Pensacola, Florida, and Kingsville, Texas, and was then assigned to Marine All-Weather-Fighter-Squadron 114 where he gained experience in the F-9 and the F-6A Skyray. After postgraduate training, he served with Marine All-Weather-Fighter-Squadron 122, from 1962 to 1965, piloting the F-8 Crusader in the United States and the Far East. Other aircraft he has flown include the F-4, T-1, T-28, T-33, T-38, H-13, and ground effect machines.

He has logged more than 8,000 flying hours, 5,365 hours of which are jet time.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Colonel Carr was one of the 19 astronauts selected by NASA in April 1966. He served as a member of the astronaut support crews and as CAPCOM for the Apollo 8 and 12 flights, and was involved in the development and testing of the lunar roving vehicle which was used on the lunar surface by Apollo flight crews.

Carr was commander of Skylab 4 (third and final manned visit to the Skylab Orbital Workshop) launched November 16, 1973, and concluded February 8, 1974. This was the longest manned flight (84 days, 1 hour, 15minutes) in the history of manned space exploration to date. He was accompanied on the record-setting 34.5-million-mile flight by Dr. Edward G. Gibson (science pilot) and William R. Pogue (pilot). The crew successfully completed 56 experiments, 26 science demonstrations, 15 subsystem-detailed objectives, and 13 student investigations during their 1,214 revolutions of the earth. They also acquired extensive earth resources observation data using hand-held cameras and Skylab's Earth Resources Experiment Package camera and sensor array. They logged 338 hours of operations of the Apollo Telescope Mount, which made extensive observations of the sun's solar processes.

From February 1974 until March 1978, Colonel Carr and his Skylab 4 teammates shared the world record for individual time in space: 2,017 hours 15 minutes 32 seconds, and Carr logged 15 hours and 48 minutes in three EVAs outside the Orbital Workshop.

In mid-1977 Carr was named head of the design support group, within the astronaut office, responsible for providing crew support to such activities as space transportation system design, simulations, testing, and safety assessment, and for development of man/machine interface requirements.

Carr retired from the United States Marine Corps in September of 1975 and from NASA in June of 1977.

BUSINESS: From 1977 until 1981 Carr was a Senior Vice President with Bovay Engineers, Inc., a Houston Consulting Engineering Firm.

He was a Senior Consultant on Special Staff to the President of Applied Research, Inc., Los Angeles, California, from 1981 to 1983. From 1983 until 1985 Carr was manager of the University of Texas 300-inch Telescope Project.

Carr founded CAMUS, Incorporated in 1984. The Family-owned Corporation provides technical support services in Zero-G Human Factors Engineering, Procedures Development, Operations Analysis, Training and Systems Integration. CAMUS was a major contributor as a technical support subcontractor to the Boeing Company in the crew systems design of the International Space Station. In addition, the corporation is involved in fine art production designed by his wife, Artist/Sculptor Pat Musick.




COLONEL WILLIAM R. POGUE
Born: January 23, 1930 in Okemah, Oklahoma
Died: March 4, 2014 in Cocoa Beach, Florida


William Reid Pogue, Colonel, U.S. Air Force (Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born January 23, 1930, in Okemah, Oklahoma, and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex W. Pogue who live in Sand Springs, Oklahoma. Married. Three children. He enjoys running and playing paddleball and handball, and his hobbies are gardening and cabinet making.

EDUCATION: Attended primary and secondary schools in Oklahoma; received a bachelor of science degree in Education from Oklahoma Baptist University in 1951 and a Master of Science degree in Mathematics from Oklahoma State University in 1960; awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree from Oklahoma Baptist University in 1974.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Air Force Association Explorers Club, American Astronautical Society, and Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1974) and JSC Superior Achievement Award (1970); winner of the Air Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, and an Outstanding Unit Citation (while a member of the USAF Thunderbirds); the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal and Command Pilot Astronaut Wings (1974); presented the City of Chicago Gold Medal (1974); the Robert J. Collier Trophy for 1973 (1974); the City of New York gold Medal (1974); the Dr. Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy for 1975 (1975); the Federation Aeronautique Internationale's De La Vaulx Medal and V. M. Komarov Diploma for 1974 (1975); the General Thomas D. White USAF Space Trophy for 1974 (1975); Fellow of the Academy of Arts and Sciences of Oklahoma State University (1975); AIAA Haley Astronautics Award for 1974 (1975); the American Astronautical Society's 1975 Flight Achievement Award (1976). Inductee 5 Civilized Tribes Hall of Fame (1975), and Oklahoma Aviation and Space Hall of Fame (1980) Clarence E. Page Memorial Trophy - Oklahoma Aviation and Space Museum (1989).

EXPERIENCE: Pogue, retired Air Force Colonel, came to the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center from an assignment at Edwards Air Force Base, California, where he had been an instructor at the Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School since October 1965.

He enlisted in the Air Force in 1951 and received his commission in 1952. While serving with the Fifth Air Force during the Korean conflict, from 1953 to 1954, he completed a combat tour in fighter bombers. From 1955 to 1957, he was a member of the USAF Thunderbirds.

He has gained proficiency in more than 50 types and models of American and British aircraft and is qualified as a civilian flight instructor. Pogue served in the mathematics department as an assistant professor at the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 1960 to 1963. In September 1965, he completed a two-year tour as test pilot with the British Ministry of Aviation under the USAF/RAF Exchange Program, after graduating from the Empire Test Pilot's School in Farnborough, England.

He has logged 7,200 hours flight time--including 4,200 hours in jet aircraft and 2,017 hours in space flight.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Colonel Pogue is one of the 19 Astronauts selected by NASA in April 1966. He served as a member of the astronaut support crews for the Apollo 7, 11, and 14 missions.

Pogue was pilot of Skylab 4 (third and final manned visit to the Skylab orbital workshop), launched November 16, 1973, and concluded February 8, 1974. This was the longest manned flight (84 days, 1 hour and 15 minutes) in the history of manned space exploration to date. Pogue was accompanied on the record setting 34.5-million-mile flight by Gerald P. Carr (commander) and Dr. Edward G. Gibson (science-pilot). They successfully completed 56 experiments, 26 science demonstrations, 15 subsystem detailed objectives, and 13 student investigations during their 1,214 revolutions of the earth.

They also acquired extensive earth resources observations data using Skylab's earth resources experiment package camera and sensor array and logged 338 hours of operations of the Apollo Telescope Mount which made extensive observations of the sun's solar processes. Logged 13 hours and 31 minutes in two EVA's outside the orbital workshop.

Pogue retired from the United States Air Force on September 1, 1975, and he is now retired from NASA.

Pogue is self-employed as a consultant to aerospace and producer of general viewer videos on space flight.



Film Credits
2008 When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions (Other), 1994 We're Go for Launch to Zero-g (in person)


CAPTAIN ALAN L. BEAN
Born: March 15, 1932 in Wheeler, Texas

Alan Bean (Captain, U.S. Navy, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born in Wheeler, Texas, on March 15, 1932. Married. Two grown children, a son and a daughter.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Paschal High School in Fort Worth, Texas; received a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Texas in 1955; awarded an honorary doctorate of science from Texas Wesleyan College in 1972; presented an honorary doctorate of engineering science degree from the University of Akron (Ohio) in 1974.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow of the American Astronautical Society; member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots.

SPECIAL HONORS: Helped establish 11 world records in space and astronautics; awarded two NASA distinguished Service Medals, the Navy Astronaut Wings and two Navy Distinguished Service Medals; recipient of the Rear Admiral William S. Parsons Award for Scientific and Technical Progress, the University of Texas Distinguished Alumnus Award and Distinguished Engineering Graduate Award, the Godfrey L. Cabot Award, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Trustees Award, the Texas Press Associations Man of the Year Award for 1969, the City of Chicago Gold Medal, the Robert J. Collier Trophy for 1973, the Federation Aeronautique Internationales Yuri Gagarin Gold Medal for 1973 and the V.M. Komarov Diploma for 1973 (1974), the Dr. Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy for 1975 (1975), the AIAA Octave Chanute Award for 1975 (1975), the AAS Flight Achievement Award for 1974 (1975).

EXPERIENCE: Alan Bean, a Navy ROTC Student at Texas, was commissioned upon graduation in 1955. After completing flight training, he was assigned to a jet attack squadron in Jacksonville, Florida. After a four-year tour of duty, he attended the Navy Test Pilot School, then flew as a test pilot on several types of naval aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Alan Bean was one of the third group of astronauts named by NASA in October 1963. He served as backup astronaut for the Gemini 10 and Apollo 9 missions.

Captain Bean was lunar module pilot on Apollo 12, mans second lunar landing. In November 1969, Captain Bean and Captain Pete Conrad landed in the moons Ocean of Stormsafter a flight of some 250,000 miles. They explored the lunar surface, deployed several lunar surface experiments, and installed the first nuclear power generator station on the moon to provide the power source. Captain Richard Gordon remained in lunar orbit photographing landing sites for future missions.

Captain Bean was spacecraft commander of Skylab Mission II (SL-3), July 29 to September 25, 1973. With him on the 59-day, 24,400,000 mile world record setting flight were scientist-astronaut Dr. Owen K. Garriott and Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel Jack R. Lousma. Mission II accomplished 150% of its pre-mission forecast goals.

On his next assignment, Captain Bean was backup spacecraft commander of the United States flight crew for the joint American-Russian Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

Captain Bean has logged 1,671 hours and 45 minutes in spaceof which 10 hours and 26 minutes were spent in EVAs on the moon and in earth orbit. Captain Bean has flown 27 types of military aircraft as well as many civilian airplanes. He has logged more than 7,145 hours flying timeincluding 4,890 hours in jet aircraft. Captain Bean retired from the Navy in October 1975 but continued as head of the Astronaut Candidate Operations and Training Group within the Astronaut Office in a civilian capacity.

Bean resigned from NASA in June 1981 to devote his full time to painting. He said his decision was based on the fact that, in his 18 years as an astronaut, he was fortunate enough to visit worlds and see sights no artists eye, past or present, has ever viewed firsthand and he hopes to express these experiences through the medium of art. He is pursuing this dream at his home and studio in Houston.




OWEN K. GARRIOTT
Born: November 22, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma

Owen K. Garriott (Ph.D.)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born November 22, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Enid High School in 1948; received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1953 and a M.S. and Ph.D from Stanford University in Electrical Engineering in 1957 and 1960, respectively. Completed one year U.S. Air Force Pilot Training Program (1966), receiving qualification as pilot in jet aircraft.

ORGANIZATIONS: American Astronautical Society (Fellow), American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (Associate Fellow), Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, American Geophysical Union, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Space Explorers (Board of Directors), Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (Vice President and Vice Chairman).

SPECIAL HONORS: National Science Foundation Fellowship, 1960-61; Honorary Doctorate of Science, Phillips University (Enid, OK), 1973; NASA Distinguished Service Medal, 1973; Collier Trophy for 1973; Federation Aeronautique International, Komarov Diploma for 1973; Goddard Memorial Trophy for 1975; NASA Space Flight Medal, 1983; and additional awards related to his space flights, including the Oklahoma Hall of Fame (1980), Oklahoma Air and Space Hall of Fame (1980), the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame (1997), the Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame (2000) and Enid Public Schools Hall of Fame (2001).

EXPERIENCE: Served as electronics officer on active duty in the U.S. Navy from 1953 to 1956. From 1961 through 1965 he was an Assistant Professor, then Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He performed research and led graduate studies in ionospheric physics after obtaining his doctorate and authored or co-authored more than 45 scientific papers, chapters and one book, principally in areas of the physical sciences.

In 1965 he was one of the first six Scientist-Astronauts selected by NASA. His first space flight aboard Skylab in 1973 set a new world record for duration of approximately 60 days, more than double the previous record. Extensive experimental studies of our sun, of earth resources and in various life sciences relating to human adaptation to weightlessness were made.

His second space flight was aboard Spacelab-1 in 1983, a multidisciplinary and international mission of 10 days. Over 70 separate experiments in six different disciplines were conducted, primarily to demonstrate the suitability of Spacelab for research in all these areas. He operated the world's first Amateur Radio Station from space, W5LFL, which has since expanded into an important activity on dozens of Shuttle flights, Space Station MIR and now the International Space Station, with scores of astronauts and cosmonauts participating.

Between these missions, he received a NASA fellowship for one year's study at Stanford (1975-76) and held the posts of Deputy, Acting and Director of Science and Applications at Johnson Space Center, (1974-75, 76-78). In the latter post he was responsible for all research in the physical sciences at the Johnson Space Center. From 1984 to 1986, he held the position of Project Scientist in the Space Station Project Office. In this position he worked closely with the external scientific communities and advised the Project Manager concerning the scientific suitability of the Space Station design.

After leaving NASA in June, 1986, he consulted for various aerospace companies and served as a member of several NASA and National Research Council Committees.

From January 1988 until May 1993, he was Vice President of Space Programs at Teledyne Brown Engineering. This Division, which grew to over 1,000 people, provided payload integration for all Spacelab projects at the Marshall Space Flight Center and had a substantial role in the development of the U.S. Laboratory for the International Space Station.

He has devoted additional time to several charitable activities in his home town, including the Enid (OK) Arts and Sciences Foundation of which he was a co-Founder in 1992. More recently, he has accepted a position as Adjunct Professor in the Laboratory for Structural Biology at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and has participated in research activities there involving new microbes he has returned from extreme environments such as very alkaline lakes and deep sea hydrothermal vents. Hyperthermophiles were returned from several dives in Russian MIR submersibles to the Rainbow Vents at a depth of 2,300 meters near the Azores in the Atlantic Ocean. Other research activities included three trips to Antarctica from which 20 meteorites were returned for laboratory study.




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