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NEIL ARMSTRONG - PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: SCOTT CROSSFIELD, MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT MICHAEL WHITE, COLONEL WILLIAM J. "PETE" KNIGHT, BILL H. DANA, MAJOR GENERAL JOE ENGLE, MILT ORVILLE THOMPSON - DOCUMENT 322402

 
X-15 PILOTS
A one of a kind piece of space flight history, this 11x14 photograph of the powerful X-15 has been signed by eight of it's twelve pilots; Peter Knight, Milt Thompson, Bob White, Joe Engle, Bill Dana, Scott Crossfield, and first man on the moon Neil Armstrong!
Photograph signed: "Peter Knight", "Milt Thompson", "Bob White", "Neil Armstrong", "Joe Engle", "Bill Dana", "Scott Crossfield", 11x14. The X-15 was an experimental rocket-powered aircraft operated by the US Air Force and NASA as part of the X-plane series. The X-15 set a large list of records, including 13 different flights that exceeded the altitude of 50 miles, making the 8 flight pilots qualified for USAF astronaut status. There were a total of 12 pilots for the powerful aircraft, including NEIL ARMSTRONG (altitude 39.2 miles), SCOTT CROSSFIELD (altitude 15.3 miles), BILL DANA (altitude 58.1 miles), JOE ENGLE (altitude 53.1 miles), PETE KNIGHT (altitude 53.1 miles), MILT THOMPSON (altitude 40.5 miles), and BOB WHITE (altitude 59.6 miles). All these pilots went on to accomplish great feats on their own accord, with Neil Armstrong going on to be the first man to walk on the moon. There were two X-15's in production; the original, which perished while in flight by Michael J. Adams (who died in the crash), and a second which was retired in 1969 and now resides at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, celebrating it's remarkable place in space flight history. Fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

NEIL ARMSTRONG   MILT ORVILLE THOMPSON   SCOTT CROSSFIELD   MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT MICHAEL WHITE   COLONEL WILLIAM J. KNIGHT   BILL H. DANA   MAJOR GENERAL JOE ENGLE  


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NEIL ARMSTRONG
Born: August 5, 1930 in Wapakoneta, Ohio
Died: August 25, 2012 in Cincinnati, Ohio


Neil A. Armstrong
NASA Astronaut (deceased)

PERSONAL DATA: Born on August 5, 1930, in Wapakoneta, Ohio. Married. Two sons. Died on August 25, 2012.

EDUCATION: Armstrong received a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering from Purdue University and a Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Southern California. He held honorary doctorates from multiple universities.

SPECIAL HONORS: Armstrong was a Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots and the Royal Aeronautical Society and an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the International Astronautics Federation.

Armstrong was a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Academy of the Kingdom of Morocco. He served as a member of the National Commission on Space (1985 to 1986), as Vice-Chairman of the Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident (1986) and as Chairman of the Presidential Advisory Committee for the Peace Corps (1971 to 1973).

Armstrong was decorated by 17 countries. He was the recipient of many special honors, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Gold Medal, the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, the Explorers Club Medal, the Robert H. Goddard Memorial Trophy, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the Harmon International Aviation Trophy, the Royal Geographic Society's Gold Medal, the Federation Aeronautique Internationale's Gold Space Medal, the American Astronautical Society Flight Achievement Award, the Robert J. Collier Trophy, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Astronautics Award, the Octave Chanute Award and the John J. Montgomery Award.

EXPERIENCE: After serving as a naval aviator from 1949 to 1952, Armstrong joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1955. His first assignment was with the NACA Lewis Research Center (now NASA Glenn Research Center) in Cleveland. Over the next 17 years, he was an engineer, test pilot, astronaut and administrator for NACA and its successor agency, NASA.

He was Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Cincinnati between 1971 and 1979. During the years 1982 to 1992, Armstrong was chairman of Computing Technologies for Aviation, Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia.

NASA EXPERIENCE: As a research pilot at NASA's Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, Armstrong was a project pilot on many pioneering high speed aircraft, including the well known, 4000-mph X-15. He flew more than 200 different models of aircraft, including jets, rockets, helicopters and gliders.

Armstrong transferred to astronaut status in 1962. He was assigned as command pilot for the Gemini 8 mission. Gemini 8 was launched on March 16, 1966, and Armstrong performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space.

As spacecraft commander for Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, Armstrong gained the distinction of being the first man to land a craft on the moon and first to step on its surface.

Armstrong subsequently held the position of Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. In this position, he was responsible for the coordination and management of overall NASA research and technology work related to aeronautics.

He resigned from NASA in 1971.



Film Credits
2014 Kill Your Killer (Other), 2013 Warehouse 13 (Other), 2013 The UFO Experience (Other), 2013 America's Book of Secrets (Other), 2012 The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (Other), 2012 One Giant Leap: A Neil Armstrong Tribute (Other), 2012 Neil Armstrong: First Man on the Moon (Other), 2012 Here I Stand (Other), 2012 Ancient Aliens (Other), 2012 America's Book of Secrets (in person), 2011 Doctor Who (Other), 2010 Talk im Hangar-7 (in person), 2010 Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey (Performer), 2010 Mad and Bad: 60 Years of Science on TV (Other), 2009 The Third Foot An Interview with Buzz Aldrin (in person), 2009 The Apollo Years (in person), 2009 The 23rd Annual Midsouth Emmy Awards (Other), 2009 Regreso a la Luna (Other), 2009 Reaching Tranquility: The 40th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Lunar (Other), 2009 NASA: Triumph and Tragedy (in person), 2009 Moonshot (Other), 2009 Cosmonaut (Other), 2009 Apollo Zero (Other), 2009 40 Years on the Moon (Other), 2008-2009 When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions (in person), 2008 When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions (Other), 2008 Nova (Other), 2008 Naked Science (in person), 2008 Moon Machines (in person), 2008 Fly Me to the Moon 3D (in person), 2008 Cold Case (Other), 2007 Timeshift (Other), 2007 The Wonder of It All (Other), 2007 The New 7 Wonders of the World (in person), 2007 The Mars Underground (Other), 2007 Tank on the Moon (Other), 2007 Secrets of the Moon Landings (Other), 2007 MoonFaker (Other), 2007 Mars Rising (in person), 2007 In the Shadow of the Moon (Other), 2006 The Minerva Awards 2006: Sally Ride (Other), 2006 60 Minutes (Other), 2005 Movies That Shook the World (Other), 2005 How Art Made the World (in person), 2005 First on the Moon: The Untold Story (Other), 2005 Conquering Space: The Moon and Beyond (Other), 2005 Beyond the Moon: Failure Is Not an Option 2 (Other), 2005 60 Minutes (in person), 2004 One Small Step for Man (in person), 2004 Naked Science (Other), 2003 Unsere Besten (Other), 2003 The Truth Behind the Moon Landings: Stranger Than Fiction (Other), 2003 Sea of Silence (Other), 2003 Kitty Hawk: The Wright Brothers' Journey of Invention (in person), 2003 Failure Is Not an Option (Other), 2003 Days That Shook the World (Other), 2003 Comic Book Superheroes Unmasked (Other), 2002 Superstructures of America (Other), 2001 The Poor Ones and One Small Step (Other), 2000 What Happened on the Moon - An Investigation Into Apollo (Other), 2000 The Dish (Other), 1999 The Planets (Other), 1999 The Century: America's Time (Other), 1999 ABC 2000: The Millennium (in person), 1999 A Walk on the Moon (Other), 1997 Was It Only a Paper Moon (Other), 1997 Thrill Ride: The Science of Fun (Other), 1997 Contact (Other), 1997 Ayn Rand: A Sense of Life (Other), 1995 Apollo 13 (Other), 1994 Forrest Gump (Other), 1993 Tornadoes: The Entity (in person), 1993 The Tribute: Mercury, Gemini, Apollo & Skylab (in person), 1992 The Simpsons (Other), 1991 First Flights with Neil Armstrong (in person), 1990 The Other Side of the Moon (in person), 1989 The Moon Above, the Earth Below (Other), 1989 Moontrap (Other), 1989 For All Mankind (Other), 1988 The 1960's: Music, Memories & Milestones (Other), 1988 Happy Birthday, Bob: 50 Stars Salute Your 50 Years with NBC (Other), 1987 Future Flight (in person), 1987 Biography (in person), 1983 A Good Turn Daily (Other), 1981 The Man Who Saw Tomorrow (Other), 1980 Bob Hope's Overseas Christmas Tours: Around the World with the (Other), 1979 Time After Time (Other), 1978 A Salute to American Imagination (in person), 1976 I, Tintin (Other), 1974 The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast: Bob Hope (in person), 1970 The Bob Hope Christmas Special (in person), 1970 The 12th Annual TV Week Logie Awards (in person), 1970 Moonwalk One (in person), 1969 The Sky at Night (in person), 1969 Kuustudio (in person)


MILT ORVILLE THOMPSON
Born: May 4, 1926 in Crookston, Minnesota
Died: August 6, 1993 in Lancaster, California


X-15 Flight Pilot, Deceased
Missions: X-15

Thompson was hired as an engineer at the flight research facility on 19 March 1956, when it was still under the auspices of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). He became a research pilot in January 1958.

On 16 August 1963, Thompson became the first person to fly a lifting body, the lightweight NASA M2-F1. The plywood and steel-tubing prototype was flown as a glider after being released from an R4D tow plane. He flew it a total of 47 times, and also made the first five flights of the all-metal Northrop M2-F2 lifting body, beginning 12 July 1966.

Lifting bodies were wingless vehicles designed to generate lift and aerodynamic stability from the shape of their bodies. They were flown at Dryden to study and validate the concept of safely maneuvering and landing a low lift-over-drag vehicle designed for reentry from space. Data from the program helped in the development of the Space Shuttle.

Thompson was also one of the 12 NASA, Air Force, and Navy pilots to fly the North American X-15 rocket-powered research aircraft between 1959 and 1968. He began flying X-15s on 29 October 1963, only 74 days after his first Lifting Body flight. He flew the aircraft 14 times during the following two years, reaching a maximum speed of 3,712 mph (Mach 5.48) and a peak altitude of 214,100 feet on separate flights.

The X-15 program provided a wealth of data on aerodynamics, thermodynamics, propulsion, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight.

Thompson was one of elite group of eight pilots who tested the paraglider research vehicle NASA Paresev.

In 1962 the U.S. Air Force selected Thompson to be the only civilian test pilot to fly in the X-20 Dyna-Soar program that was intended to launch a human into Earth orbit and recover with a horizontal ground landing. The program was canceled before construction of the vehicle began.




SCOTT CROSSFIELD
Born: October 2, 1921 in Berkeley, California
Died: April 19, 2006 in Ludville, Georgia


Albert S. "Scott" Crossfield joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA--the predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA) at its High Speed Flight Research Station (now NASA Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, Calif., as a research pilot in June 1950. During the next five years, he flew the X-1, X-4, X-5, XF-92A, F-51D, F-86F, F9F, B-47A, YF-84, F-84F, F-100A, YF-102, D-558-I and D-558-II. During that time he logged 100 rocket flights, making him the single most experienced rocket pilot.

Throughout his life, Crossfield advocated aerospace education and was a strong supporter of the Civil Air Patrol (USAF auxiliary) and, in particular, CAP's aerospace education program. He created the A. Scott Crossfield Aerospace Education Teacher of the Year Award to recognize and reward teachers for outstanding accomplishments in aerospace education and for their dedication to the students they teach in kindergarten through 12th grade at public, private or parochial schools. Additionally, CAP senior members can qualify for the A. Scott Crossfield Aerospace Education Award. This recognition program is for CAP senior members who have earned the Master Rating in the Aerospace Education Officer Specialty Track.

Although revered for his flying exploits, Crossfield preferred to emphasize his role as a scientist. "I am an aeronautical engineer, an aerodynamicist and a designer," he told Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine in a 1988 interview. "My flying was only primarily because I felt that it was essential to designing and building better airplanes for pilots to fly."

Crossfield died on April 19, 2006 when his private plane crashed near Ranger, Ga., during a flight from Prattville, Ala., to Manassas, Va., near his home.




MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT MICHAEL WHITE
Born: July 6, 1924 in New York City, New York
Died: March 17, 2010 in Orlando, Florida


Rank: Maojor General
X-15 Flight Pilot, Deceased
Selection: 57 MISS Group

Missions: X-15 Flight 62


White was designated the Air Force's primary pilot for the North American X-15 program in 1958. While the new plane was undergoing its initial tests, he attended the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, graduating in 1959. He made his first test flight of the X-15 on April 15, 1960, when the aircraft was fitted with two interim, 16,000 lbf (71 kN) thrust rocket engines. Four months later he flew to an altitude of 136,000 ft (41.5 km, above Rogers Dry Lake. White would have participated in the Air Force's Man In Space Soonest program, had it come to fruition.

In February, 1961, White unofficially set a new air speed record when he flew the X-15 at a speed of 2,275 mph (3,660 km/h), following the installation of a 57,000 lbf (254 kN) thrust XLR-99 engine. White was the first human to fly an aircraft at Mach 4 and later Mach 5 over the next eight months. On 9 November 1961, White flew the X-15 at 4,093 mph (6,590 km/h), making him the first pilot to fly a winged craft at six times the speed of sound (Mach 6). President John F. Kennedy used the occasion to confer the most prestigious award in American aviation, the Robert J. Collier Trophy, jointly to White and three of his fellow X-15 pilots; NASA's Joseph Walker, Commander Forrest S. Peterson of the U.S. Navy, and North American Aviation test pilot Scott Crossfield. A day later, Air Force Chief of Staff General Curtis E. LeMay awarded White his new rating as a Command Pilot Astronaut.

On 17 July 1962, Major White flew the X-15 to an altitude of 314,750 feet (59 miles, 96 km). This qualified him for an Astronaut Badge, becoming the first "Winged Astronaut", and one of a few who have flown into space without a conventional spacecraft. Major Bob White was featured with a cover story in the August 3d, 1962 issue of LIFE magazine, detailing his July 17, 1962 flight.




COLONEL WILLIAM J. KNIGHT
Born: November 18, 1929 in Noblesville, Indiana
Died: May 7, 2004 in Los Angeles, California


X-15 Flight Pilot, Deceased

Pilot Pete Knight in front of X-15 William J. "Pete" Knight, who became the world's fastest man on Oct. 3, 1967, while flying the X-15.

Knight, then an Air Force major who was part of an elite cadre of hypersonic X-15 pilots, made frontier-busting flights setting aeronautical records that stood unchallenged for years. His record-breaking Mach 6.7 (nearly seven times the speed of sound) flight remains the highest speed ever attained by a manned aircraft.

Knight, along with several other X-15 pilots, earned astronaut wings while flying the rocket-powered plane.




BILL H. DANA
Born: November 3, 1930 in Pasadena, California
Died: May 6, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona


NASA Rocket Pilot, Retired
Selection: 1960 Dyna-Soar Group 1
Missions: X-15 Flight 197

Dana was Chief Engineer at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, California, from 1993 until 1998, when he retired after almost 40 years of distinguished service to NASA. Formerly an aerospace research pilot, Dana flew the F-100 variable stability research aircraft and the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16 aircraft as well as many others.

Before his assignment as Chief Engineer, he was Assistant Chief of the Flight Operations Division, a position he assumed after serving since 1986 as Chief Pilot. He was also a project pilot on the F-15 HIDEC (Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control) research program, and a co-project pilot on the F-18 High Angle of Attack research program.

As a research pilot, Dana was involved in some of the most significant aeronautical programs carried out at Dryden. For his service as a flight research pilot, he received NASA Distinguished Service Medal in 1997. In 2000 he was awarded the Milton O. Thompson Lifetime Achievement Award by the Dryden Flight Research Center.

From 1960 through 1962 he was a pilot astronaut in the U.S. Air Force X-20 Dyna-Soar program.

Dana was a project pilot on the hypersonic North American X-15 research aircraft and flew the rocket-powered vehicle 16 times, reaching a top speed of 3,897 mph. His peak altitude of 307,000 feet (nearly 59 miles high) technically qualified him for the Astronaut Badge, although he was not formally recognized as an astronaut until 2005. He was the pilot on the final (199th) flight of the 10-year program.

In the late 1960s and in the 1970s, Dana was a project pilot on the manned lifting body program, which flew several versions of the wingless vehicles and produced data that helped in development of the Space Shuttle. He completed one NASA M2-F1, nine Northrop HL-10, nineteen Northrop M2-F3 and two Martin Marietta X-24B flights, for a total of 31 lifting body missions.
Selection: 1960 Dyna-Soar Group 1
Missions: X-15 Flight 197

Dana was Chief Engineer at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, California, from 1993 until 1998, when he retired after almost 40 years of distinguished service to NASA. Formerly an aerospace research pilot, Dana flew the F-100 variable stability research aircraft and the Advanced Fighter Technology Integration/F-16 aircraft as well as many others.

Before his assignment as Chief Engineer, he was Assistant Chief of the Flight Operations Division, a position he assumed after serving since 1986 as Chief Pilot. He was also a project pilot on the F-15 HIDEC (Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control) research program, and a co-project pilot on the F-18 High Angle of Attack research program.

As a research pilot, Dana was involved in some of the most significant aeronautical programs carried out at Dryden. For his service as a flight research pilot, he received NASA Distinguished Service Medal in 1997. In 2000 he was awarded the Milton O. Thompson Lifetime Achievement Award by the Dryden Flight Research Center.

From 1960 through 1962 he was a pilot astronaut in the U.S. Air Force X-20 Dyna-Soar program.

Dana was a project pilot on the hypersonic North American X-15 research aircraft and flew the rocket-powered vehicle 16 times, reaching a top speed of 3,897 mph. His peak altitude of 307,000 feet (nearly 59 miles high) technically qualified him for the Astronaut Badge, although he was not formally recognized as an astronaut until 2005. He was the pilot on the final (199th) flight of the 10-year program.

In the late 1960s and in the 1970s, Dana was a project pilot on the manned lifting body program, which flew several versions of the wingless vehicles and produced data that helped in development of the Space Shuttle. He completed one NASA M2-F1, nine Northrop HL-10, nineteen Northrop M2-F3 and two Martin Marietta X-24B flights, for a total of 31 lifting body missions.




MAJOR GENERAL JOE ENGLE
Born: August 26, 1932 in Dickinson County, Kansas

Major General JOE H. ENGLE
U.S. Air Force / Air National Guard, Retired
NASA Astronaut, Retired

Major General Joe H. Engle is retired from the Air National Guard, the United States Air Force, and the NASA Astronaut program. He was married to the late Mary Catherine Lawrence of Mission Hills, Kansas and has two grown children and two grandchildren. He is now married to Jeanie Carter Engle of Houston, Texas and has one stepchild. He is currently an engineering consultant and technical advisor on space vehicles and space operations, and is serving as Technical Advisor to NASA's International Space Station Advisory Committee. He is also a consultant-spokesman for Bushnell Performance Optics.

General Engle was born 26 Aug 1932 in Dickinson County, Kansas, and graduated from the University of Kansas with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering in 1956. He received his commission through the Air Force ROTC program at the University of Kansas and entered USAF flying school in March 1956.

General Engle served with the 474th Fighter Day Squadron (later re-designated the 309th Tactical Fighter Squadron) flying F-100's at George AFB, CA. In 1960 he was selected for the USAF Test Pilot School and the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School (commanded by then Col. Chuck Yeager) at Edwards AFB, CA. Upon graduation he was assigned to the Fighter Test Branch at Edwards AFB where he flew numerous and varied flight tests on century series fighters. In 1963 Captain Engle was assigned as one of two Air Force test pilots to fly the X-15 Research Rocket aircraft. On 29 June 1965 he flew the X-15 to an altitude of 280,600 feet, and became the youngest pilot ever to qualify as an astronaut. Three of his sixteen flights in the X-15 exceeded the 50-mile (264,000 feet) altitude required for astronaut rating.

In March 1966, Engle was one of 19 pilots selected for NASA space missions. He was the back-up Lunar Module Pilot for the Apollo 14 mission, and was to fly to and walk on the moon on Apollo 17 until budget cuts canceled the last 3 planned Apollo flights.

From June through October 1977, General Engle was the commander of one of two crews that flew the initial Space Shuttle “Enterprise” Approach and Landing Test flights. The Space Shuttle was flown off the top of a modified Boeing 747 for a 2 ½ minute glide test flight from 20,000 feet to landing.

On 12 Nov 1981, General Engle commanded the second orbital test flight of the Space Shuttle “Columbia”, launched from Kennedy Space Center, FL. On this flight he became the first and only pilot to manually fly an aerospace vehicle from Mach 25 to landing.

The general served as Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight at NASA Headquarters from March to December 1982. He retained his flight astronaut status and returned to Johnson Space Center in January 1983.

General Engle was Commander of Space Shuttle “Discovery” on flight 51-I which launched from Kennedy Space Center on 27 Aug 1985. The crew deployed three communications satellites, and performed a successful on-orbit rendezvous and manual repair of the disabled SYNCOM communications satellite.

General Engle has flown over 185 different types of aircraft including 38 different fighter and attack aircraft. He has logged more than 14,700 flight hours â€" 9,900 in jets and over 224 hours in space. His military decorations include the Department of Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, and the Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster. He has also been awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and NASA Space Flight Medal with device.

Other awards include the Harmon International Aviation Trophy, the Collier Trophy, the Goddard Space Trophy, the Gen. Thomas D. White Space Trophy, and the Kinchelow Experimental Test Pilot's Trophy.

In 1964, he was selected as the USAF Outstanding Young Officer of the Year. That same year he was named one of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of America by the U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce. Later that year he was named Kansan of the Year. In 1982 he received the University of Kansas Distinguished Service Citation, (the highest honor the University of Kansas can bestow upon an individual), and that same year, he received the University of Kansas School of Engineering Distinguished Engineering Service Award.

He has been inducted into the Kansas Aviation Hall of Fame, the Astronaut Hall of Fame, and in 2001 he was one of four aviation pioneers enshrined into the National Aviation Hall of Fame.

In his last active duty military assignment, General Engle was the Air National Guard Assistant to the Commander in Chief, United States Space Command and North American Air Defense Command, with Headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base, CO. As “Test Pilot Emeritus” of the USAF Test Pilot School, he remains active in flying, including current jet fighter aircraft, and is also an avid outdoor sportsman and wildlife enthusiast.




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