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SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA - STS - 55 CREW - COMMEMORATIVE ENVELOPE SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: COLONEL JERRY L. ROSS, COLONEL TERENCE "TOM" HENRICKS, COLONEL STEVE NAGEL, ULRICH WALTER, BERNARD A. HARRIS JR., COLONEL CHARLES PRECOURT, HANS SCHLEGEL - HFSID 296174

 
SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA: STS-55 MISSION
Commemorative Envelope signed by all seven crew members: Nagel, Henricks, Ross, Precourt, Harris, Walter and Schlegel
Commemorative Envelope signed: "Hans Schlegel", "Steve Nagel", "Ulrich Walter", "Tom Henricks", "Jerry L. Ross", "Bernard Harris", "Charles Precourt", 6½x3½. Envelope postmarked Edwards Air Force Base, California, May 6, 1993. Space shuttle mission STS-55, the 55th orbital flight and the fourteenth flight of Columbia, was launched from Kennedy Space Center on April 26, 1993 and returned to Edwards Air Force Base on May 6. This flight was a multinational Spacelab flight involving 88 experiments from eleven different nations, with projects ranging from biological experiments to earth observations. The crew was composed of Commander STEVEN R. NAGEL; Pilot TERENCE T. HENRICKS; Mission Specialists JERRY L. ROSS, CHARLES J. PRECOURT and BERNARD A. HARRIS, JR; and Payload Specialists ULRICH WALTER and HANS SCHLEGEL. The mission was also called the D-2 (Deutschland-2) missions, because this Spacelab and the (two Payload Specialists) were German. Fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA - STS - 55 CREW   COLONEL CHARLES PRECOURT   HANS SCHLEGEL   COLONEL JERRY L. ROSS   COLONEL TERENCE HENRICKS   COLONEL STEVE NAGEL   ULRICH WALTER   BERNARD A. HARRIS JR.  


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COLONEL CHARLES PRECOURT
Born: June 29, 1955 in Waltham, Massachusetts

Charles J. Precourt (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born June 29, 1955, in Waltham, Massachusetts, but considers Hudson, Massachusetts, to be his hometown. Married to the former Lynne Denise Mungle of St. Charles, Missouri. They have three daughters, Michelle, Sarah, and Aimee. Precourt enjoys golf and flying light aircraft. He flies a Varieze, an experimental aircraft that he built. His parents, Charles and Helen Precourt, reside in Hudson. Her mother, Jerry Mungle, resides in Pearland, Texas.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Hudson High School, Hudson, Massachusetts, in 1973; received a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the United States Air Force Academy in 1977, a master of science degree in engineering management from Golden Gate University in 1988, and a master of arts degree in national security affairs and strategic studies from the United States Naval War College in 1990. While at the United States Air Force Academy, Precourt also attended the French Air Force Academy in 1976 as part of an exchange program. Fluent in French and Russian.

ORGANIZATIONS: Vice President of the Association of Space Explorers; Associate Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots (SETP), and member of the Experimental Aircraft Association.

SPECIAL HONORS: Military decorations include: the Legion of Merit, the Defense Superior Service Medal (2); the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Force Meritorious Service Medal (2). Distinguished graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and the United States Naval War College. In 1978 he was the Air Training Command Trophy Winner as the outstanding graduate of his pilot training class. In 1989 he was recipient of the David B. Barnes Award as the Outstanding Instructor Pilot at the United States Air Force Test Pilot School. NASA awards include: the NASA Distinguished Service Medal; the Exceptional Service Medal and Outstanding Leadership Medal; and the NASA Space Flight Medal (4).

EXPERIENCE: Precourt graduated from Undergraduate Pilot Training at Reese Air Force Base, Texas, in 1978. Initially he flew as an instructor pilot in the T-37, and later as a maintenance test pilot in the T-37 and T-38 aircraft. From 1982 through 1984, he flew an operational tour in the F-15 Eagle at Bitburg Air Base in Germany. In 1985 he attended the United States Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Upon graduation, Precourt was assigned as a test pilot at Edwards, where he flew the F-15E, F-4, A-7, and A-37 aircraft until mid 1989, when he began studies at the United States Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. Upon graduation from the War College, Precourt joined the astronaut program. His flight experience includes over 7,500 hours in over 60 types of civil and military aircraft. He holds commercial pilot, multi-engine instrument, glider and certified flight instructor ratings. Precourt retired from the Air Force on March 31, 2000.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Precourt became an astronaut in July 1991. His other technical assignments to date have included: Manager of ascent, entry, and launch abort issues for the Astronaut Office Operations Development Branch; spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM), providing the voice link from the Mission Control Center during launch and entry for several Space Shuttle missions; Director of Operations for NASA at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, from October 1995 to April 1996, with responsibility for the coordination and implementation of mission operations activities in the Moscow region for the joint U.S./Russian Shuttle/Mir program. From May 1996 to September 1998, he served as Acting Assistant Director (Technical), Johnson Space Center. From October 1998 through November 2002, Precourt was Chief of the Astronaut Corps, responsible for the mission preparation activities of all space shuttle and future International Space Station crews and their support personnel. In his final assignment he was the Deputy Manager for the International Space Station, responsible for the day-to-day management of ISS operations, on orbit assembly and the interfaces with NASA contractors and the International Partners. A veteran of four space flights, he has logged over 932 hours in space. He served as a mission specialist on STS-55 (April 26 to May 6, 1993), was the pilot on STS-71 (June 27 to July 7, 1995), and was the spacecraft commander on STS-84 (May 15-24, 1997) and STS-91 (June 2-12, 1998), the final scheduled Shuttle-Mir docking mission, concluding the joint U.S./Russian Phase I Program. Precourt left NASA in March 2005 and is now working for Thiokol in Utah.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-55 Columbia launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on April 26, 1993. Nearly 90 experiments were conducted during this German-sponsored Spacelab D-2 mission to investigate life sciences, materials sciences, physics, robotics, astronomy and the Earth and its atmosphere. STS-55 also flew the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) making contact with students in 14 schools around the world. After 160 orbits of the earth in 240 flight hours, the 10-day mission concluded with a landing on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on May 6, 1993.

STS-71 (June 27 to July 7, 1995) was the first Space Shuttle mission to dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, and involved an exchange of crews (seven-member crew at launch, eight-member crew on return). The Atlantis Space Shuttle was modified to carry a docking system compatible with the Russian Mir Space Station. It also carried a Spacehab module in the payload bay in which the crew performed various life sciences experiments and data collections. STS-71 Atlantis launched from and returned to land at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Mission duration was 235 hours, 23 minutes.

STS-84 Atlantis (May 15-24, 1997) carried a seven-member international crew. This was NASA's sixth Shuttle mission to rendezvous and dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the 9-day flight, the crew conducted a number of secondary experiments and transferred nearly 4 tons of supplies and experiment equipment between the Space Shuttle and the Mir station. STS-84 Atlantis launched from and returned to land at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Mission duration was 221 hours and 20 minutes.

STS-91 Discovery (June 2-12, 1998) was the 9th and final Shuttle-Mir docking mission and marked the conclusion of the highly successful joint U.S./Russian Phase I Program. The crew, including a Russian cosmonaut, performed logistics and hardware resupply of the Mir during four docked days. They also conducted the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment, which involved the first of its kind research of antimatter in space. Mission duration was 235 hours, 54 minutes.




HANS SCHLEGEL
Born: August 5, 1951 in Überlingen, Germany

Personal data

Born 3 August 1951 in Ãœberlingen, Germany, but considers Aachen to be his hometown. Married to Heike Walpot. He has seven children. Recreational interests include skiing, scuba diving and flying. He also enjoys reading, and being a handyman.

Education

He spent 1968/69 in the US as an American Field Service (AFS) exchange student and graduated from Lewis Central High School, Council Bluffs, Iowa. In 1970 he graduated from Hansa Gymnasium, a secondary school emphasizing mathematics and science at Cologne, Germany. In 1979 he received a Diploma in Physics (Master of Physics) from the University of Aachen, Germany.

Organisations

Member of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (German Physical Society) and of the AFS - Interkulturelle Begegnungen (American Field Service Germany).

Special honours

Verdienstkreuz 1. Klasse des Verdienstordens der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Federal Service Cross 1st Class, Federal Republic of Germany). Russian Medal of Friendship.

Experience

From 1970-72, he served as a paratrooper with the Federal Armed Forces. He left with the rank of second lieutenant, and after several reserve trainings, he was appointed reserve lieutenant in 1980. From 1979-86 he worked as an experimental Solid State Physicist at the Rheinisch Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen (University of Aachen) and performed research in the field of electronic transport properties and optical properties of semiconductors. From 1986-88 he was a Specialist in non-destructive testing methodology in the research and development department of the company “Institut Dr. Förster Gmbh & Co. KG” in Reutlingen, Germany.

From 1988 to 1990 he performed Basic Astronaut Training at the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR). This training included academic education and microgravity experience on approximately 1300 parabulas on KC-135. He became a certified research diver and holds a Private Pilot's license, including instrument rating and aerobatics.

In 1990 he was assigned payload specialist for the D-2 Mission and started Payload Training in Cologne, Germany and at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. This second German Spacelab mission successfully took place from 26 April to 6 May 1993 (STS-55 Columbia).

In August 1995 he went to the Yuri A. Gagarin Training Center (Moscow) to train for the German-Russian MIR‘97 Mission as a backup. During the mission (10 February to 2 March 1997) he served as Crew Interface Coordinator responsible for ground-to-air communications. Between June 1997 and January 1998, he received additional training and certification as 2nd board engineer for the Russian Space Station MIR.

In 1998 he joined the European Astronaut Corps of the European Space Agency.

In August 1998, ESA sent him to the Johnson Space Center for training as a Mission Specialist with the NASA Astronaut Class of '98. In addition to his training he was also assigned to the CAPCOM Branch of the Astronaut Office, conducting voice communication to the International Space Station, he worked as lead ISS CAPCOM and as ISS Instructor CAPCOM.

In July 2006 Hans Schlegel was assigned to the STS-122 mission that delivered the European Space Agency's Columbus Laboratory to the International Space Station.

Spaceflight experience

From 26 April to 6 May 1993, Schlegel served as Payload Specialist on STS-55 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. Nearly 90 experiments were conducted during the German Spacelab D-2 mission to investigate life sciences, material sciences, physics, robotics, astronomy, and the Earth and its atmosphere.

His second spaceflight the STS-122 mission launched on 7 February 2008 aboard Atlantis and ended on 20 February 2008. The mission highlight was the delivery and installation of the Columbus Module, the major contributing element of the European Space Agency to the International Space Station. Hans Schlegel performed one spacewalk (Extravehicular Activity-EVA) of nearly 7 hours to help prepare the Columbus laboratory for its scientific work, and to replace an expended nitrogen tank on the Station's P-1 Truss. STS-122 mission was also a crew replacement mission, delivering ESA astronaut Léopold Eyharts to the ISS.




COLONEL JERRY L. ROSS
Born: January 20, 1948 in Crown Point, Indiana

Jerry L. Ross (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
nasa astronaut (Former)
Johnson Space Center

PERSONAL DATA: Born January 20, 1948, in Crown Point, Indiana. He is married to the former Karen S. Pearson of Sheridan, Indiana. They have two children. He enjoys genealogy, traveling, photography, stained glass, woodworking and model rocketry. His parents, Donald J. Ross and Phyllis E. (Dillabaugh) Ross, are deceased. Karen's parents, Morris D. and Wilma Pearson, reside in Sheridan, Indiana.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Crown Point High School, Crown Point, Indiana, in 1966; received Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University in 1970 and 1972, respectively.

ORGANIZATIONS: Lifetime Member of the Association of Space Explorers, the Purdue Alumni Association and the Clan Ross Association of the USA. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Association of Space Explorers, USA.

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded two Defense Superior Service Medals, the Air Force Legion of Merit, four Defense Meritorious Service Medals, two Air Force Meritorious Service Medals and the National Intelligence Medal of Achievement. He was a Distinguished Graduate of the USAF Test Pilot School and the recipient of the Outstanding Flight Test Engineer Award, Class 75B. Ross received 15 NASA medals. He was awarded the American Astronautical Society's Victor A. Prather Award for spacewalking achievements (1985, 1990 and 1999) and the Flight Achievement Award (1992, 1996, 1999 and 2002). Ross received an Honorary Doctor of Science degree from Purdue University in 2000 and the Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award from Purdue University in 2004. His home town school system has named an elementary school in his honor.

AIR FORCE EXPERIENCE: Ross, an Air Force ROTC student at Purdue University, received his commission upon graduation in 1970. After receiving his master's degree from Purdue in 1972, he entered active duty with the Air Force and was assigned to the Ramjet Engine Division of the Air Force Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. He conducted computer-aided design studies on ramjet propulsion systems, served as the project engineer for captive tests of a supersonic ramjet missile using a rocket sled track and served as the project manager for preliminary configuration development of the ASALM strategic air-launched missile. From June 1974 to July 1975, he was the Laboratory Executive Officer and Chief of the Management Operations Office. Ross graduated from the USAF Test Pilot School's Flight Test Engineer Course in 1976 and was subsequently assigned to the 6510th Test Wing at Edwards Air Force Base, California. While on assignment to the 6510th's Flight Test Engineering Directorate, he was project engineer on a limited flying qualities evaluation of the RC-135S aircraft and, as lead B-1 flying qualities flight test engineer, he was responsible for the stability and control and flight control system testing performed on the B-1 aircraft. He was also responsible, as chief B-1 flight test engineer, for training and supervising all Air Force B-1 flight test engineer crewmembers and for performing mission planning for the B-1 offensive avionics test aircraft.

Ross has flown in 21 different types of aircraft, holds a private pilot's license and has logged more than 4,100 flying hours, the majority in military aircraft. He retired from the Air Force on March 31, 2000.

NASA EXPERIENCE: In February 1979, Ross was assigned by the Air Force to the Payload Operations Division at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center as a payload officer/flight controller, responsible for the flight operations integration of military payloads into the Space Shuttle. Ross was selected as an astronaut in May 1980. His technical assignments since then have included EVA (spacewalks); Robotics; Space Shuttle Landing Chase Team; support crewman for STS-41B, 41C and 51A; spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) during STS-41B, 41C, 41D, 51A and 51D; Chief of the Mission Support Branch; member of the 1990 Astronaut Selection Board; Acting Deputy Chief of the Astronaut Office; Chief of the Astronaut Office EVA and Robotics Branch and Astronaut Office Branch Chief for Kennedy Space Center Operations Support. From 2004 to 2007, he served as the Chief Astronaut of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC).

Ross flew as a mission specialist on STS-61B (1985), STS-27 (1988) and STS-37 (1991); was the Payload Commander on STS-55/Spacelab-D2 (1993); and served as a mission specialist on the second Space Shuttle to rendezvous and dock with the Russian Space Station Mir, STS-74 (1995), the first International Space Station (ISS) assembly mission, STS-88 (1998) and on another Space Station assembly mission, STS-110 (2002). A veteran of seven space flights, Ross has more than 1,393 hours in space, including 58 hours and 18 minutes of EVA on nine spacewalks. He was the first human to be launched into space seven times. These seven flights comprise a world record that Ross now shares with one other NASA astronaut. Both his number of and time on spacewalks are all time second highest among NASA astronauts.

Ross served as Chief of the Vehicle Integration Test Office at the Johnson Space Center from 2003 through 2011. He retired from NASA in January 2012.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-61B was launched at night from Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, on November 26, 1985. During the mission, the crew deployed the MORELOS-B, AUSSAT II and SATCOM Ku-2 communications satellites and operated numerous experiments inside the Space Shuttle. Ross conducted two 6-hour spacewalks to demonstrate Space Station construction techniques with the EASE/ACCESS experiments. After completing 108 orbits of the Earth in 165 hours, 4 minutes and 49 seconds, STS-61B Atlantis landed on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on December 3, 1985.

STS-27 Atlantis launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on December 2, 1988. The mission carried a Department of Defense payload as well as a number of secondary payloads. After 68 orbits of the Earth in 105 hours, 6 minutes and 19 seconds, the mission concluded with a dry lakebed landing on Runway 17 at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on December 6, 1988.

STS-37 Atlantis launched from KSC on April 5, 1991, and deployed the 35,000-pound Gamma Ray Observatory, the heaviest civilian satellite ever launched by a Shuttle and the second of NASA's four “great observatories.” Ross performed two spacewalks totaling 10 hours and 49 minutes to manually deploy the obstructed Gamma Ray Observatory antenna and to test prototype Space Station EVA hardware. After 93 orbits of the Earth in 143 hours, 32 minutes and 44 seconds, the mission concluded with a landing on Runway 33 at Edwards Air Force Base on April 11, 1991.

From April 26, 1993, to May 6, 1993, Ross served as Payload Commander/Mission Specialist on STS-55 aboard the Orbiter Columbia. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, Runway 22, after 160 orbits of the Earth in 239 hours and 45 minutes. Nearly 90 experiments were conducted during the German-sponsored Spacelab D-2 mission to investigate life sciences, material sciences, physics, robotics, astronomy and the Earth and its atmosphere.

STS-74 was NASA's second Space Shuttle mission to rendezvous and dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-74 launched on November 12, 1995, and landed at Kennedy Space Center on November 20, 1995. During the 8-day flight the crew aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis attached a permanent docking module to Mir, conducted a number of secondary experiments and transferred 3,000 pounds of supplies and experiment equipment between Atlantis and the Mir station. The STS-74 mission was accomplished in 129 orbits of the Earth, with Atlantis traveling 3.4 million miles in 196 hours, 30 minutes and 44 seconds.

STS-88 Endeavour (December 4 to December 15, 1998) was the first ISS assembly mission. During the 12-day mission, the U.S.-built Unity module was mated with the orbiting, unmanned Russian Zarya module. Ross performed three spacewalks totaling 21 hours and 22 minutes to connect umbilicals and attach tools and hardware to the exterior of the core modules of the ISS. The crew also deployed two small satellites, Mighty Sat 1 and SAC-A. The mission was accomplished in 185 orbits of the Earth in 283 hours and 18 minutes.

STS-110 Atlantis (April 8-19, 2002) was the 13th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS. This, the first mission in the final phase of the ISS assembly, included the delivery and installation of the S0 (S-Zero) Truss, the first use of the station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the station and the first time that all of the spacewalks performed on a Shuttle mission were based from the Station's Quest Airlock. Ross performed two EVAs totaling 14 hours and 9 minutes. Mission duration was 259 hours and 42 minutes, with 171 orbits of the Earth.

Ross supported the Space Shuttle Program as an Astronaut from before the first launch in April 1981 to the last landing in July 2011. He also supported the International Space Station Program from its inception through the completion of assembly of the ISS in 2011.




COLONEL TERENCE HENRICKS
Born: July 5, 1952 in Bryan, Ohio

Terence T. "Tom" Henricks (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born July 5, 1952, in Bryan, Ohio, but considers Woodville, Ohio, to be his hometown. Married to the former Rebecca Grantham of Marshall, Texas. Three children.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Woodmore High School in 1970; received a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from the United States Air Force (USAF) Academy in 1974, and a masters degree in public administration from Golden Gate University in 1982.

SPECIAL HONORS: The Distinguished Flying Cross, the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, two Air Force Meritorious Service Medals, two Air Force Commendation Medals, four NASA Space Flight Medals, Honorary Doctor of Science degree from the Defiance College (1993), F-4 Fighter Weapons School Outstanding Flying Award. Named Pilot Training Distinguished Graduate and F-16 Conversion Course Top Gun. Inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame.

EXPERIENCE: Henricks completed pilot training at Craig Air Force Base (AFB) in Selma, Alabama, and F-4 conversion training at Homestead AFB in Miami, Florida. He then flew the F-4 in fighter squadrons in England and Iceland. In 1980, he was reassigned to Nellis AFB, Las Vegas, Nevada. After attending the USAF Test Pilot School in 1983, he remained at Edwards AFB, California, as an F-16C test pilot and Chief of the 57th Fighter Weapons Wing Operating Location until his NASA selection. He has 749 parachute jumps and a Master Parachutist rating. He has flown 30 different types of aircraft, has logged over 6,000 hours flying time, and holds an FAA commercial pilot rating.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in June 1985, Henricks became an astronaut in July 1986. His technical assignments to date include: re-evaluating Shuttle landing sites world wide; Assistant Manager for Engineering Integration in the Shuttle Program Office; Lead Astronaut of the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory at Johnson Space Center, and of Vehicle Test and Checkout at the Kennedy Space Center; Chief of the Astronaut Office Operations Development Branch. He also served as the Assistant for Shuttle to the Chief of the Astronaut Office, directing crew involvement in the development and operation of the Shuttle. A commander of two Space Shuttle missions and pilot of two others, Henricks became the first person to log over 1,000 hours as a Space Shuttle pilot/commander. Tom Henricks left government service in November 1997 to pursue a career in business.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-44 Atlantis launched the night of November 24, 1991. The primary mission objective was the deployment of a Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite with an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket booster. The mission was concluded after 110 orbits of the Earth returning to a landing on the lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on December 1, 1991.

STS-55, the German D-2 Spacelab mission, was launched on April 26, 1993, aboard Columbia, and landed 10-days later on May 6, 1993, at Edwards AFB California. During the ambitious mission 89 experiments were performed in many disciplines such as materials processing, life sciences, robotics, technology, astronomy, and Earth mapping.

STS-70 launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on July 13, 1995, and returned there July 22, 1995. During 142 orbits of the Earth, the crew performed a variety of experiments in addition to deploying the sixth and final NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite. STS-70, with an "all-Ohio" crew, was the first mission controlled from the new combined control center.

STS-78 launched June 20, 1996 and landed July 7, 1996 becoming the longest Space Shuttle mission to date. The 16-day mission included studies sponsored by ten nations and five space agencies, and was the first mission to combine both a full microgravity studies agenda and a comprehensive life science investigation. The Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission served as a model for future studies on board the International Space Station.




COLONEL STEVE NAGEL
Born: October 27, 1946 in Canton, Illinois
Died: August 21, 2014 in Columbia, Missouri


Steven R. Nagel (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born October 27, 1946, in Canton, Illinois. Married to Linda M. Godwin of Houston, Texas. Two daughters. His hobbies include sport flying and astronomy.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Canton Senior High School, Canton, Illinois, in 1964; received a bachelor of science degree in aerospace engineering (high honors) from the University of Illinois in 1969 and a master of science degree in mechanical engineering from California State University, Fresno, California, in 1978.

ORGANIZATIONS: Order of Daedalians, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Society of Experimental Test Pilots, Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded the Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with 7 Oak Leaf Clusters; for undergraduate pilot training, recipient of the Commander's Trophy, the Flying Trophy, the Academic Trophy and the Orville Wright Achievement Award (Order of Daedalians). Also presented the Air Force Meritorious Service Medal (1978). Recipient of four NASA Space Flight Medals (1985, 1991, 1993); Exceptional Service Medals (1988, 1989); Outstanding Leadership Medal (1992); AAS Flight Achievement Award, STS-37 Crew (1992); Outstanding Alumni Award, University of Illinois (1992); Distinguished Service Medal (1994), Distinguished Alumni Award, California State University, Fresno (1994) and Lincoln Laureate, State of Illinois (1994).

EXPERIENCE: Nagel received his commission in 1969 through the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) program at the University of Illinois. He completed undergraduate pilot training at Laredo Air Force Base, Texas, in February 1970, and subsequently reported to Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, for F-100 training.

From October 1970 to July 1971, Nagel was an F-100 pilot with the 68th Tactical Fighter Squadron at England Air Force Base, Louisiana. He served a 1-year tour of duty as a T-28 instructor for the Laotian Air Force at Udorn RTAFB, Udorn, Thailand, prior to returning to the United States in October 1972 to assume A-7D instructor pilot and flight examiner duties at England Air Force Base, Louisiana. Nagel attended the USAF Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California, from February to December 1975. In January 1976, he was assigned to the 6512th Test Squadron located at Edwards. As a test pilot, he worked on various projects, including flying the F-4 and A-7D.

He has logged 12,600 hours flying time; 9,640 hours in jet aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Nagel became a NASA astronaut in August 1979. His technical assignments have included backup T‑38 chase pilot for STS-1; support crew and backup entry spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) for STS-2; support crew and primary entry CAPCOM for STS-3; software verification at the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL) and the Flight Simulation Laboratory (FSL); representative of the Astronaut Office in the development of a crew escape system for the space shuttle and acting chief of the astronaut office. Nagel is a veteran of four space flights (STS-51G and STS-61 in 1985, STS-37 in 1991 and STS-55 in 1993) as described below.

Nagel first flew as a mission specialist on STS-51G, which launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on June 17, 1985. The crew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery deployed communications satellites for Mexico (Morelos), the Arab League (Arabsat) and the United States (AT&T Telstar). They used the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to deploy and later retrieve the SPARTAN satellite, which performed 17 hours of x-ray astronomy experiments while separated from the space shuttle. In addition, the crew activated the Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (ADSF) and six “Getaway Specials,” participated in biomedical experiments and conducted a laser tracking experiment as part of the Strategic Defense Initiative. After completing approximately 170 hours of space flight, Discovery landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on June 24, 1985.

Nagel then flew as pilot on STS-61A, the West German D-1 Spacelab mission, which launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on October 30, 1985. This mission was the first in which payload activities were controlled from outside the United States. More than 75 scientific experiments were completed in the areas of physiological sciences, materials processing, biology and navigation. After completing 111 orbits of the Earth, Space Shuttle Challenger landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on November 6, 1985.

On his third flight, Nagel was commander of STS-37, which launched into orbit on April 5, 1991, from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and landed on April 11, 1991, at Edwards Air Force Base, California. During this mission, the crew aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis deployed the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) for the purpose of exploring gamma ray sources throughout the universe and conducted the first scheduled spacewalk in more than 5.5 years. Also, the crew performed the first successful unscheduled spacewalk to free a stuck antenna on GRO.

Nagel also served as commander of STS-55, the German D-2 Spacelab mission. After launching on April 26, 1993, on the Shuttle Columbia, the crew landed 10 days later on May 6, 1993, at Edwards Air Force Base, California. During the ambitious mission, 89 experiments were performed in many disciplines, such as materials processing, life sciences, robotics, technology, astronomy and earth mapping.

With the completion of his fourth flight, Nagel has logged a total of 723 hours in space.

Nagel retired from the Air Force effective February 28, 1995. He retired from the Astronaut Office effective March 1, 1995, to assume the full-time position of deputy director for operations development, Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance Office, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. In September 1996, Nagel transferred to the Aircraft Operations Division where he performed duties as a research pilot, chief of aviation safety and deputy division chief. He retired from NASA on May 31, 2011.




ULRICH WALTER
Born: February 9, 1954 in Iserlohn, Germany

Ulrich Walter
German Science Astronaut (Payload Specialist)

PERSONAL DATA: Born February 9, 1954, in Iserlohn, Germany. Married. Two children. He enjoys sports, such as badminton, basketball, and soccer, as well as pop and classical music, electronics (analog, digital, and HF), and photography.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member, German Physical Society.

PUBLICATIONS: Dr. Walter has some 35 publications in various international scientific journals. Author of two "Bericht der KFA Jlich" (Reports of the National Research Laboratory at Julich, Germany).

SPECIAL HONORS: A research fellowship at the University of California at Berkeley by the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (German Physical Society), 1986-1987.

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES: Physical Science in the fields of Neutron Scattering Techniques, Rare Earth Magnetism, High-Tc Superconductivity, and ScanningTunneling Microscopy.

EDUCATION:

1960-1964 Primary School in Iserlohn

1964-1972 Mrkisches Gymnasium (secondary school) in Iserlohn.

1974-1980 Studying Physics at the University at Cologne.

1980 Diploma in Experimental Physics. (Special Field: Crystal Field Effects in metallic systems.

EXPERIENCE:

1972-1973 Served as a volunteer with the German Federal Armed Forces.

1973-1974 Lieutenant and instructor at the Army Air-Defense School, Rendsburg, Germany.

1980-1985 Member of the academic staff at the University of Cologne in the field of Solid State Physics.

1985 Doctoral Thesis at the University of Cologne in the field of Solid State Physics.

1985-1986 Post-doctoral position at Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, Illinois.

1986-1987 Post-doctoral position at the University of California at Berkley, California.

Aug 1987 Nominated as a German Science Astronaut.

1988-90 Basic Astronaut Training at DLR.

Sep 1990 Assignment to the German D-2 Mission.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: Dr. Walter flew as prime payload specialist PS-1 on STS-55 Columbia (April 26 to May 6, 1993). STS-55 was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and returned to land at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Nearly 90 experiments were conducted during this German-sponsored Spacelab D-2 mission to investigate life sciences, materials sciences, physics, robotics, astronomy and the Earth and its atmosphere. STS-55 also flew the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) making contact with students in 14 schools around the world. At mission conclusion, Dr. Walter had traveled over 4.1 million miles in 160 Earth orbits, and logged over 239 hours in space.




BERNARD A. HARRIS JR.
Born: June 26, 1956 in Temple, Texas

NAME: Bernard A. Harris, Jr., (M.D.)
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born June 26, 1956, in Temple, Texas. Married to the former Sandra Fay Lewis of Sunnyvale, California. They have one child. He enjoys flying, sailing, skiing, running, scuba diving, art and music. Bernard's mother, Mrs. Gussie H. Burgess, and his stepfather, Mr. Joe Roye Burgess, reside in San Antonio, Texas. His father, Mr. Bernard A. Harris, Sr., resides in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Sandra's parents, Mr. & Mrs. Joe Reed, reside in Sunnyvale.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Sam Houston High School, San Antonio, Texas, in 1974; received a bachelor of science degree in biology from University of Houston in 1978, a doctorate in medicine from Texas Tech University School of Medicine in 1982. Dr. Harris completed a residency in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in 1985. In addition, he completed a National Research Council Fellowship at NASA Ames Research Center in 1987, and trained as a flight surgeon at the Aerospace School of Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas, in 1988. Dr. Harris also received a master's degree in biomedical science from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston in 1996.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the American College of Physicians, American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, Aerospace Medical Association, National Medical Association, American Medical Association, Minnesota Medical Association, Texas Medical Association, Harris County Medical Society, Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Texas Tech University Alumni Association, and Mayo Clinic Alumni Association. Aircraft Owners and Pilot Association. Association of Space Explorers. American Astronautical Society. Member, Board of Directors, Boys and Girls Club of Houston. Committee Member, Greater Houston Area Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Member, Board of Directors, Manned Space Flight Education Foundation Inc.

SPECIAL HONORS: 1996 Honorary Doctorate of Science, Morehouse School of Medicine. Medal of Excellence, Golden State Minority Foundation 1996. NASA Award of Merit 1996. NASA Equal Opportunity Medal 1996. NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal 1996. The Challenger Award, The Ronald E. McNair Foundation 1996. Award of Achievement, The Association of Black Cardiologists 1996. Space Act Tech Brief Award 1995. Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, Zeta of Texas Chapter 1995. Election of Fellowship in the American College of Physicians 1994. Distinguished Alumnus, The University of Houston Alumni Organization 1994. Distinguished Scientist of the Year, ARCS Foundation, Inc., 1994. Life Membership, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. NASA Space Flight Medals 1993, 1995. NASA Outstanding Performance Rating 1993. JSC Group Achievement Award 1993. Physician of the Year, National Technical Association, 1993. Achiever of the Year, National Technical Association, 1993. American Astronautical Society Melbourne W. Boynton Award for Outstanding Contribution to Space Medicine 1993. Achievement Award, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity 1993. Who's Who Among Rising Young Americans Citation 1992. Certificate of Merit, Governor of Texas 1990. City of San Antonio Citation for Achievement 1990. NASA Sustained Superior Performance Award 1989. NASA Outstanding Performance Rating 1988. NASA Sustained Superior Performance Award 1988, 1989. National Research Council Fellowship 1986, 1987. Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society 1985. Outstanding Young Men of America 1984. University of Houston Achievement Award 1978. Achievement Award 1978.

EXPERIENCE: After completing his residency training in 1985 at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Harris then completed a National Research Council Fellowship at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. While at Ames he conducted research in the field of musculoskeletal physiology, and disuse osteoporosis, completing his fellowship in 1987. He then joined NASA Johnson Space Center as a clinical scientist and flight surgeon. His duties included clinical investigations of space adaptation and the development of countermeasures for extended duration space flight. Assigned to the Medical Science Division, he held the title of Project Manager, Exercise Countermeasure Project. Dr. Harris holds several faculty appointments. He is an associate professor in internal medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch; an assistant professor at the Baylor College of Medicine; a clinical professor at the University of Texas School of Medicine; and is an adjunct professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health. He is a member, Board of Regents for the Texas Tech University Health Science Center in Lubbock, Texas. Fellow, American College of Physicians. He is the author and co-author of numerous scientific publications. In addition, Dr. Harris has been in group medical practice in internal medicine with both the South Texas Primary Care in San Antonio, Texas, and with the San Jose Medical Group in San Jose, California. Dr. Harris is also a licensed private pilot.

Selected by NASA in January 1990, Dr. Harris became an astronaut in July 1991. He is qualified for assignment as a mission specialist on future Space Shuttle flight crews. He served as the crew representative for Shuttle Software in the Astronaut Office Operations Development Branch. A veteran of two space flights, Dr. Harris has logged more than 438 hours in space. He was a mission specialist on STS-55 (April 26 to May 6, 1993), and was the Payload Commander on STS-63 (February 2-11, 1995).

Dr. Harris was assigned as a mission specialist on STS-55, Spacelab D-2, in August 1991, and later flew on board Columbia for ten days, (April 26 to May 6, 1993), marking the Shuttle's one year of total flight time. Dr. Harris was part of the payload crew of Spacelab D-2, conducting a variety of research in physical and life sciences. During this flight, Dr. Harris logged over 239 hours and 4,164,183 miles in space.

Most recently, Dr. Harris was the Payload Commander on STS-63 (February 2-11, 1995), the first flight of the new joint Russian-American Space Program. Mission highlights included the rendezvous with the Russian Space Station, Mir, operation of a variety of investigations in the Spacehab module, and the deployment and retrieval of Spartan 204. During the flight, Dr. Harris became the first African-American to walk in space. He logged 198 hours, 29 minutes in space, completed 129 orbits, and traveled over 2.9 million miles.

Dr. Harris left NASA in April 1996. He is Chief Scientist and Vice-President of Science and Health Services.



Film Credits
1996 Last Angel of History (in person)


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