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SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY - STS - 96 CREW - COMMEMORATIVE ENVELOPE SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: TAMARA "TAMMY" JERNIGAN, ELLEN OCHOA, CAPTAIN KENT V. ROMINGER, COLONEL RICK HUSBAND, DANIEL T. BARRY, JULIE PAYETTE - HFSID 296177

 
SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY: STS-96 MISSION
Commemorative Envelope of the flight to the International Space Station signed by six crew members: Rominger, Husband, Ochoa, Jernigan, Barry and Payette
Commemorative Envelope signed: "K. V. Rominger", "Rick Husband", "Ellen Ochoa", "Tamara Jernigan", "Dan Barry", "Julie Payette", 6½x3½. Envelope bears two postmarks from the Kennedy Space Center, May 17 and June 6, 1999. Space shuttle mission STS-96, the 94th flight of a space shuttle, was launched from Kennedy Space Center on May 17, 1999 and returned safely to the same site on June 6. Discovery delivered the Spacehab module, filled with cargo for outfitting the International Space Station. Other equipment, including the Russian cargo crane Strela, was also transported to the ISS. The crew was composed of Commander KENT V. ROMINGER; Pilot RICK HUSBAND; and Mission Specialists ELLEN OCHOA, TAMARA JERNIGAN, DANIEL BARRY and JULIE PAQUETTE. An addition crew member, Russian cosmonaut Valeri Tokarev, has not signed. Fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY - STS - 96 CREW   COLONEL RICK HUSBAND   DANIEL T. BARRY   JULIE PAYETTE   TAMARA JERNIGAN   ELLEN OCHOA   CAPTAIN KENT V. ROMINGER  


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COLONEL RICK HUSBAND
Born: July 12, 1957 in Amarillo, Texas
Died: February 1, 2003 in STS-107 (Columbia) ON REENTRY


RICK DOUGLAS HUSBAND (Colonel, U.S. Air Force)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Deceased)

PERSONAL DATA: Born July 12, 1957, in Amarillo, Texas. Died on February 1, 2003 over the southern United States when Space Shuttle Columbia and the crew perished during entry, 16 minutes prior to scheduled landing. He is survived by his wife and their two children. He enjoyed singing, water and snow skiing, cycling, and spending time with his family.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Amarillo High School, Amarillo, Texas, in 1975. Received a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering from Texas Tech University in 1980, and a master of science degree in mechanical engineering from California State University, Fresno, in 1990.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, Tau Beta Pi, Air Force Association, and the Texas Tech Ex-Students Association.

AWARDS: Posthumously awarded the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, the NASA Space Flight Medal, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, and the Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM.

SPECIAL HONORS: Distinguished Graduate of AFROTC, Undergraduate Pilot Training, Squadron Officers School, F-4 Instructor School, and USAF Test Pilot School; Outstanding Engineering Student Award, Texas Tech University, 1980; F-4 Tactical Air Command Instructor Pilot of the Year (1987); named a 1997 Distinguished Engineer of the College of Engineering, Texas Tech University. Military decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Aerial Achievement Medal, the Air Force Commendation Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, two NASA Group Achievement Awards for work on the X-38 Development Team and the Orbiter Upgrade Definition Team.

EXPERIENCE: After graduation from Texas Tech University in May 1980, Husband was commissioned a second lieutenant in the USAF and attended pilot training at Vance Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma. He graduated in October 1981, and was assigned to F-4 training at Homestead AFB, Florida. After completion of F-4 training in September 1982, Husband was assigned to Moody AFB, Georgia flying the F-4E. From September to November 1985, he attended F-4 Instructor School at Homestead AFB and was assigned as an F-4E instructor pilot and academic instructor at George AFB, California in December 1985. In December 1987, Husband was assigned to Edwards AFB, California, where he attended the USAF Test Pilot School. Upon completion of Test Pilot School, Husband served as a test pilot flying the F-4 and all five models of the F-15. In the F-15 Combined Test Force, Husband was the program manager for the Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 increased performance engine, and also served as the F-15 Aerial Demonstration Pilot. In June 1992, Husband was assigned to the Aircraft and Armament Evaluation Establishment at Boscombe Down, England, as an exchange test pilot with the Royal Air Force. At Boscombe Down, Husband was the Tornado GR1 and GR4 Project Pilot and served as a test pilot in the Hawk, Hunter, Buccaneer, Jet Provost, Tucano, and Harvard. He logged over 3800 hours of flight time in more than 40 different types of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Husband was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in December 1994. He reported to the Johnson Space Center in March 1995 to begin a year of training and evaluation. Upon completion of training, he was named the Astronaut Office representative for Advanced Projects at Johnson Space Center, working on Space Shuttle Upgrades, the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) and studies to return to the Moon and travel to Mars. He also served as Chief of Safety for the Astronaut Office. Husband was pilot on STS-96 (1999) and crew commander on STS-107 (2003), logging 24 days, 51 hours and 33 minutes in space.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-96 Discovery (May 27 to June 6, 1999) was a 10-day mission during which the crew performed the first docking with the International Space Station and delivered 4 tons of logistics and supplies in preparation for the arrival of the first crew to live on the station early next year. The mission was accomplished in 153 Earth orbits, traveling 4 million miles in 9 days, 19 hours and 13 minutes.

STS-107 Columbia (January 16 to February 1, 2003). The 16-day flight was a dedicated science and research mission. Working 24 hours a day, in two alternating shifts, the crew successfully conducted approximately 80 experiments. The STS-107 mission ended abruptly on February 1, 2003 when Space Shuttle Columbia and the crew perished during entry, 16 minutes before scheduled landing.




DANIEL T. BARRY
Born: December 30, 1953 in Norwalk, Connecticut

Daniel T. Barry (M.D., Ph.D.)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born December 30, 1953, in Norwalk, Connecticut, but considers South Hadley, Massachusetts, to be his hometown. Enjoys flying, tennis, running.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Bolton High School, Alexandria, Louisiana, in 1971; received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University in 1975; a master of engineering degree and a master of arts degree in electrical engineering/computer science from Princeton University in 1977; a doctorate in electrical engineering/computer science from Princeton University in 1980; and a doctorate in medicine from the University of Miami in 1982.

ORGANIZATIONS: Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE); American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM); American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPMR); Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP); Sigma Xi; Association of Space Explorers, United States Tennis Association.

SPECIAL HONORS: 1971 McMullen Engineering Award. 1979 NSF National Needs Fellow. 1984 Young Investigator Award, American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM). 1985-1990 Clinical Investigator Development Award, National Institutes of Health. 1990 Silver Crutch Teaching Award, University of Michigan. 1992-1996 Trustee, Albert and Ellen Grass Foundation. 1996 Honorary 2-Dan Go Player, Nihon Kiin, Japan. 1996, 1999, 2001 NASA Space Flight Medals. 1996 Honorary Doctor of Science, St. Louis University. 1998 Vladimir Komarov Diploma, Federation Aeronautique Internationale. 1999 Honorary Life Member, United States Tennis Association. 1999 Stuart Reiner Award, AAEM, 2000 William Beaumont Award, Wayne State Medical Society. 2000, 2002 NASA Exceptional Service Medals. 2001 Top 10 in the world career spacewalk hours. 2001 100 Most Notable Princeton Graduate School Alumni of the 20 th Century. 2002 Erdman Award, American Association of Academic Physiatrists. 2003 Paul J, Corcoran Award, Harvard Medical School. 2003 Honorary Doctor of Science, Beloit College.

EXPERIENCE: Following graduate school at Princeton University, Dr. Barry was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow in physics at Princeton. He then attended the University of Miami Medical School, graduating in 1982. He completed an internship and a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency at the University of Michigan in 1985. He was appointed as an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and in the Bioengineering Program at the University of Michigan in 1985, and his tenure was approved by the Regents in 1992. He spent the summers of 1985-87 at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, supported by the Grass Foundation for work in skeletal muscle physiology and as the Associate Director of the Grass Foundation Fellowship Program (1986-87). His research primarily involved biological signal processing, including signal processing theory, algorithms, and applications to specific biological systems. The applications included acoustic signals generated by contracting skeletal muscle, electrical signals from muscle, and heart sounds. He has also worked in prosthetic design. Dr. Barry's work has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Grass Foundation, and the American Heart Association of Michigan. He has five patents, over 50 articles in scientific journals, and has served on two scientific journal editorial boards.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in March 1992, Dr. Barry reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1992. He completed one year of training and qualified for assignment as a mission specialist on Space Shuttle flight crews. Dr. Barry has worked on primary payload development, the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL), portable computing issues for Space Shuttle, Chief of Astronaut Appearances, flight clinic ombudsman, source board member for the NASA Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), Astronaut Office team lead to NASDA, the Japanese Space Agency, Chief, ISS Hardware, US and International, and a tour of duty with the Office of Biological & Physical Research and the Office of Education, NASA Headquarters, Washington D.C. A veteran of three space flights, STS-72 (1996), STS-96 (1999) and STS-105 (2001), Dr. Barry has logged over 734 hours in space, including 4 spacewalks totaling 25 hours and 53 minutes. Dr. Barry retired from NASA in April 2005 to start his own company “Denbar Robotics” where he currently builds robots.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-72 Endeavour (January 11-20, 1996) was a 9-day flight during which the crew retrieved the Space Flyer Unit (launched from Japan 10-months earlier), deployed and retrieved the OAST-Flyer, and Dr. Barry performed a 6 hour, 9 minute spacewalk designed to demonstrate and evaluate techniques to be used in the assembly of the International Space Station. Mission duration was 142 Earth orbits, traveling 3.7 million miles in 214 hours and 41 seconds.

STS-96 Discovery (May 27 to June 6, 1999) was the 1st mission to dock with the International Space Station. It was a 10-day mission during which the crew delivered 4 tons of logistics and supplies in preparation for the arrival of the first crew to live on the station. The mission was accomplished in 153 Earth orbits, traveling 4 million miles in 235 hours and 13 minutes. Dr. Barry performed a spacewalk of 7 hours and 55 minute duration.

STS-105 Discovery (Aug 10-22, 2001) was the 11th mission to the International Space Station. While at the orbital outpost, the STS-105 crew delivered the Expedition-3 crew, attached the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, and transferred over 2.7 metric tons of supplies and equipment to the station. Dr. Barry and Pat Forrester performed two spacewalks totaling 11 hours and 45 minutes of EVA time. STS-105 also brought home the Expedition-2 crew. The STS-105 mission was accomplished in 186 orbits of the Earth, traveling over 4.9 million miles in 285 hours and 13 minutes.




JULIE PAYETTE
Born: October 20, 1963 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Personal Profile: Born October 20, 1963, in Montreal, Quebec, Ms. Payette enjoys running, skiing, racquet sports and scuba diving. She has a commercial pilot license with float rating. Ms. Payette is fluent in French and English, and can converse in Spanish, Italian, Russian and German. She plays the piano and has sung with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, the Piacere Vocale in Basel, Switzerland, and the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra in Toronto. She is married to William (Billie) Flynn, test pilot and LCol (ret) from the Canadian Air Force. They have two children.

Education: Attended primary and secondary school in Montreal, Quebec. International Baccalaureate (1982) from the United World College of the Atlantic in Wales, UK. Bachelor of Engineering, Electrical (1986) cum laude from McGill University, Montreal. Master of Applied Science - Computer Engineering (1990) from the University of Toronto.

Organizations: Member of l'Ordre des Ingénieurs du Québec and the International Academy of Astronautics. Member of the Board of Canada's "Own The Podium" Olympic High Performance Program. Former Governor-in-Council for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and member of the board of Queen's University. Les Amies d'affaires du Ritz.

Special Honours: Received one of six Canadian scholarships to attend the Atlantic College in Wales, UK (1980). Greville-Smith Scholarship (1982-1986), highest undergraduate award at McGill University. McGill University Faculty Scholar (1983-1986). NSERC post-graduate Scholarship (1988-1990). Massey College Fellowship (1988-1990). Canadian Council of Professional Engineers; distinction for exceptional achievement by a young engineer (1994). NASA Space Flight Medal (1999). Chevalier de l'Ordre de la Pléiade de la francophonie (2001). Knight of l'Ordre National du Québec (2002). NASA Space Flight Medal (2009). University of Ottawa Distinguish Canadian Leadership Award (2009). Carried the Olympic flag in the opening ceremonies of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, British Columbia. Engineers Canada Gold Medal (2010), highest recognition of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers. Inducted in the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame (2010). NASA Exceptional Service Medal (2010). Officer of the Order of Canada (2010).

Honorary Degrees: Queen's University (1999); University of Ottawa (1999); Simon Fraser University (2000); Université Laval (2000); University of Regina (2001); Royal Roads University (2001); University of Toronto (2001); University of Victoria (2002); Nipissing University (2002); McGill University (2003); Mount Saint Vincent University (2004); McMaster University (2004); University of Lethbridge (2005); Mount Allison University (2005); University of Alberta (2006); York University (2010); University of Waterloo (2010); Concordia University (2010).

Experience: Before joining the space program, Ms. Payette conducted research in computer systems, natural language processing and automatic speech recognition. She worked as a system engineer with IBM Canada (1986-1988); research assistant at the University of Toronto (1988-1990); visiting scientist at the IBM Research Laboratory, in Zurich, Switzerland (1991) and research engineer with BNR/Northern in Montreal (1992).

In June 1992, the Canadian Space Agency selected Ms. Payette from 5330 applicants to become one of four astronauts. After her basic training in Canada, she worked as a technical advisor for the Mobile Servicing System (MSS), an advanced robotics system contributed by Canada to the International Space Station (ISS).

In preparation for a space mission assignment, Ms. Payette obtained her commercial pilot license, studied Russian and logged 120 hours as a research operator on board reduced gravity aircraft. In April 1996, Ms. Payette was certified as a one-atmosphere, deep-sea diving suit operator. Ms. Payette obtained her military pilot captaincy on the Tutor CT-114 ''Snowbird'' jet at the Canadian Air Force Base in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan in February 1996. She obtained her military instrument rating in 1997. She has logged more than 1300 hours of flight time. Ms. Payette was Chief Astronaut for the Canadian Space Agency from 2000 to 2007.

NASA Experience: Ms. Payette reported to the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas in August 1996. She completed initial astronaut training in April 1998 and was assigned to work on technical issues in robotics for the Astronaut Office. In 1999 she flew on STS-96 and has logged over 465 hours in space. A veteran of two space flights, STS-96 (1999) and STS-127 (2009), she has logged over 611 hours in space.

From September 1999 to December 2002, Ms. Payette was assigned to represent the Astronaut corps at the European and Russian space agencies where she supervised procedure development, equipment verification and space hardware processing for the International Space Station Program.

Since January 2003, Ms. Payette works as a CAPCOM (Capsule Communicator) at Mission Control Center in Houston and was Lead CAPCOM for Space Shuttle mission
STS-121 (2006). The CAPCOM is responsible for all communications between ground controllers and the astronauts in flight.

Space Flight Experience: Julie Payette flew on Space Shuttle Discovery from May 27 to June 6, 1999 as a crewmember of STS-96. During the mission, the crew performed the first manual docking of the Shuttle to the International Space Station, and delivered four tons of supplies to the Station. Ms. Payette served as a mission specialist, was responsible for the Station systems, supervised the space walk and operated the Canadarm robotic arm. The STS-96 mission was accomplished in 153 orbits of the Earth, traveling more than six million kilometres in 9 days, 19 hours and 13 minutes. Ms. Payette was the first Canadian to participate in an ISS assembly mission and to board the Space Station.

From July 15 to 31, 2009, Julie Payette served as the flight engineer on the crew of STS-127 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on the 29th Shuttle mission to the International Space Station. During this mission, also known as ISS Assembly Mission 2J/A, the crew completed the construction of the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, installed scientific experiments on its Exposed Facility and delivered critical spare parts and replacement batteries to the orbital complex. Robotics technology was used almost every day on this assembly mission and Ms. Payette operated all three robotic arms – the Shuttle's Canadarm, the Station's Canadarm2, and a special-purpose Japanese arm on Kibo. While the Shuttle was docked to the ISS, the mission featured a record 13 astronauts from 5 different nationalities together on board a single joint spacecraft. It also highlighted the first time two Canadians were in space at the same time. The 16-day mission included five spacewalks, travelling 10.5 million kilometers in 248 orbits around the Earth.

In Januyary 2011, Julie Payette undertook a fellowship as a Public Policy Scholar at the prestigious Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. Since October 2011, Ms. Payette has been the scientific authority for Quebec in Washington on behalf of Quebec's Department of Economic Development, Innovation and Export Trade. During her assignment, Ms. Payette remains a member of the Canadian Astronaut corps.




TAMARA JERNIGAN
Born: May 7, 1959 in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Tamara E. "Tammy" Jernigan (Ph.D.)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born May 7, 1959, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Married to Peter J.K. "Jeff" Wisoff. She enjoys volleyball, racquetball, softball, and flying. As an undergraduate, she competed in intercollegiate athletics on Stanford's varsity volleyball team. Her father, Mr. Terry L. Jernigan, resides in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Her mother, Mrs. Mary P. Jernigan, resides in Hesperia, California.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Santa Fe High School, Santa Fe Springs, California, in 1977; received a bachelor of science degree in physics (with honors), and a master of science degree in engineering science from Stanford University in 1981 and 1983, a master of science degree in astronomy from the University of California-Berkeley in 1985, and a doctorate in space physics and astronomy from Rice University in 1988.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the American Astronomical Association, the American Physical Society, the United States Volleyball Association, and a Lifetime Member of Girl Scouts.

AWARDS: Distinguished Service Medal (2000, 1997); Lowell Thomas Award, Explorer's Club (2000); Group Achievement Award â€" EVA Development Test Team (1997); Fédération Aéronautique Internationale Vladimir Komorov Diploma (1997, 1996); Outstanding Leadership Medal (1996); Outstanding Performance Award (1993); Exceptional Service Medal (1993); Laurels Award, Aviation Week (1991); NASA Space Flight Medal (2000, 1996, 1995, 1992, 1991).

EXPERIENCE: After graduating from Stanford University, Jernigan served as a research scientist in the Theoretical Studies Branch at NASA Ames Research Center from June 1981 until July 1985. Her research interests have included the study of bipolar outflows in regions of star formation, gamma ray bursters, and shock wave phenomena in the interstellar medium.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in June 1985, Dr. Jernigan became an astronaut in July 1986. Her assignments since then have included: software verification in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL); operations coordination on secondary payloads; spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) in Mission Control for STS-30, STS-28, STS-34, STS-33, and STS-32; lead astronaut for flight software development; Chief of the Astronaut Office Mission Development Branch; Deputy Chief of the Astronaut Office. Prior to STS-96 she served as the Assistant for Station to the Chief of the Astronaut Office, directing crew involvement in the development and operation of the Station. A veteran of five space flights, Dr. Jernigan has logged over 1,512 hours in space, including an EVA totaling 7 hours and 55 minutes. She was a mission specialist on STS-40 (June 5-14, 1991) and STS-52 (October 22-November 1, 1992), was the payload commander on STS-67 (March 2-18, 1995), and again served as a mission specialist on STS-80 (November 19 to December 7, 1996) and STS-96 (May 27 to June 6, 1999). Currently, Dr. Jernigan serves as the Lead Astronaut for Space Station external maintenance. She also formulates and advocates Astronaut Office EVA input into the design, maintenance, and operation of research and systems modules built by our Italian partners.
Dr. Jernigan retired from NASA in September 2001 to accept a position at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where she serves as Assistant Associate Director for Physics and Advanced Technologies.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-40 Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) was a dedicated space and life sciences mission aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. During the nine-day flight crew members performed experiments which explored how humans, animals and cells respond to microgravity and readapt to Earth's gravity on return. Other payloads included experiments designed to investigate materials science, plant biology and cosmic radiation. Mission duration was 218 hours, 14 minutes, 20 seconds. Landing was at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

STS-52 was also launched aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. During the ten-day flight, the crew deployed the Italian Laser Geodynamic Satellite (LAGEOS) which will be used to measure movement of the Earth's crust, and operated the U.S. Microgravity Payload 1 (USMP-1). Also, the Space Vision System (SVS), developed by the Canadian Space Agency, was tested by the crew using a small target assembly which was released from the remote manipulator system. The SVS will be used for Space Station construction. In addition, numerous other experiments were performed by the crew encompassing the areas of geophysics, materials science, biological research and applied research for Space Station. Mission duration was 236 hours, 56 minutes 13 seconds. Landing was at Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

STS-67 Astro-2 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour was the second flight of the Astro observatory, a unique complement of three telescopes. During this record-setting 16-day mission, the crew conducted observations around the clock to study the far ultraviolet spectra of faint astronomical objects and the polarization of ultraviolet light coming from hot stars and distant galaxies. Mission duration was 399 hours and 9 minutes. Landing was at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

On STS-80 the crew aboard Space Shuttle Columbia successfully deployed and retrieved the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) and the Orbiting Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (ORFEUS) satellites. The free-flying WSF created a super vacuum in its wake and grew thin film wafers for use in semiconductors and other high-tech electrical components. The ORFEUS instruments, mounted on the reusable Shuttle Pallet Satellite, studied the origin and makeup of stars. Her two planned spacewalks were lost due to a jammed outer hatch on the airlock. Mission duration was a record breaking 423 hours, 53 minutes.

STS-96 Discovery (May 27 to June 6, 1999) was a 10-day mission during which the crew performed the first docking to the International Space Station, and delivered 4 tons of logistics and supplies in preparation for the arrival of the first crew to live on the station early next year. The mission was accomplished in 153 Earth orbits, traveling 4 million miles in 235 hours and 13 minutes, during which Dr. Jernigan performed an EVA of 7 hours and 55 minute duration.




ELLEN OCHOA
Born: May 10, 1958 in Los Angeles, California

Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D)
DIRECTOR, LYNDON B. JOHNSON SPACE CENTER

PERSONAL DATA: Born in 1958 in Los Angeles, California, but considers La Mesa, California, to be her hometown. Married to Coe Fulmer Miles of Molalla, Oregon. They have two children. She is a classical flutist and private pilot, and also enjoys volleyball and bicycling. Ellen's mother, Rosanne Ochoa, is deceased. Coe's mother, Georgia Zak, is deceased. His stepfather, Louis Zak, resides in John Day, Oregon.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Grossmont High School, La Mesa, California, in 1975; received a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from San Diego State University in 1980, and a Master of Science degree and Doctorate in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1981 and 1985, respectively.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Optical Society of America (OSA), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi honor societies.

SPECIAL HONORS: NASA awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, Exceptional Service Medal, Outstanding Leadership Medal, and four Space Flight Medals. Recipient of numerous other awards, including the Harvard Foundation Science Award, Women in Aerospace Outstanding Achievement Award, The Hispanic Engineer Albert Baez Award for Outstanding Technical Contribution to Humanity, the Hispanic Heritage Leadership Award, and San Diego State University Alumna of the Year. She also has two schools named after her: Ellen Ochoa Middle School in Pasco, Washington, and the Ellen Ochoa Learning Center in Cudahy, California.

EXPERIENCE: As a doctoral student at Stanford, and later as a researcher at Sandia National Laboratories and NASA Ames Research Center, Dr. Ochoa investigated optical systems for performing information processing. She is a co-inventor on three patents for an optical inspection system, an optical object recognition method, and a method for noise removal in images. As Chief of the Intelligent Systems Technology Branch at Ames, she supervised 35 engineers and scientists in the research and development of computational systems for aerospace missions. Dr. Ochoa has presented numerous papers at technical conferences and in scientific journals.

Selected by NASA in January 1990, Dr. Ochoa became an astronaut in July 1991. Her technical assignments in the Astronaut Office include serving as the Crew Representative for flight software, computer hardware and robotics, Assistant for Space Station to the Chief of the Astronaut Office, lead spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) in Mission Control, Acting Deputy Chief of the Astronaut Office, Deputy Director of Flight Crew Operations, and Director, Flight Crew Operations, where she managed and directed the Astronaut Office and Aircraft Operations. A veteran of four space flights, Dr. Ochoa has logged over 978 hours in space. She was a mission specialist on STS-56 (1993), was the Payload Commander on STS-66 (1994), and was a mission specialist and flight engineer on STS-96 (1999) and STS-110 (2002). Dr. Ochoa currently serves as Director of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-56 ATLAS-2 Discovery (April 4-17, 1993) was a 9-day mission during which the crew conducted atmospheric and solar studies in order to better understand the effect of solar activity on the Earth's climate and environment. Dr. Ochoa used the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm to deploy and capture the Spartan satellite, which studied the solar corona.

Dr. Ochoa was the Payload Commander on the STS-66 Atlantis Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 mission (November 3-14, 1994). ATLAS-3 continued the series of Spacelab flights to study the energy of the sun during an 11-year solar cycle and to learn how changes in the sun's irradiance affect the earth's climate and environment. Dr. Ochoa used the RMS to retrieve the CRISTA-SPAS atmospheric research satellite at the end of its 8-day free flight.

STS-96 Discovery (May 27 to June 6, 1999) was a 10-day mission during which the crew performed the first docking to the International Space Station, and delivered 4 tons of logistics and supplies in preparation for the arrival of the first crew to live on the station. Dr. Ochoa coordinated the transfer of supplies and also operated the RMS during the 8-hour spacewalk.

STS-110 Atlantis (April 8-19, 2002) was the 13th space shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station. Milestones during the 11-day mission included: the delivery and installation of the S0 (S-Zero) Truss; the first time the station's robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the station; and the first time that all of a space shuttle crew's spacewalks were based from the station's Quest Airlock. Dr. Ochoa, along with Expedition 4 crewmembers Dan Bursch and Carl Walz, operated the station's robotic arm to install S0, and to move crewmembers during three of the four spacewalks.




CAPTAIN KENT V. ROMINGER
Born: August 7, 1956 in Del Norte, Colorado

Kent V. Rominger (Captain, U.S. Navy, Retired)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born August 7, 1956, in Del Norte, Colorado. Married to the former Mary Sue Rule. They have one child. He enjoys snow skiing, water skiing, horseback riding, and running. His parents, Mr. & Mrs. R. Vernon Rominger, reside in Del Norte, Colorado. Her parents, Mr. & Mrs. Delbert Rule, of Durango, Colorado, are deceased.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Del Norte High School, Del Norte, Colorado, in 1974; received a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from Colorado State University in 1978; a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1987.

ORGANIZATIONS: Association of Space Explorers, Society of Experimental Test Pilots, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Association of Naval Aviation, and Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Society.

SPECIAL HONORS: Defense Superior Service Medal. Distinguished Flying Cross. Defense Meritorious Service Medal. NASA Distinguished Service Medal. Colorado Aviation Hall of Fame Inductee (2000). Distinguished Graduate, U.S. Naval Test Pilot School. Naval Air Test Center Test Pilot of the Year (1988). Society of Experimental Test Pilots Ray E. Tenhoff Award (1990) and Jack Northrop Award (1996). Colorado State University Distinguished Service Award (1997). West Coast Tomcat Fighter Pilot of the Year (1992). Top Ten Carrier Landing Distinction in Airwings Two and Nine.

EXPERIENCE: Rominger received his commission through the Aviation Reserve Officer Candidate (AVROC) Program in 1979, and was designated a Naval Aviator in September 1980. Following training in the F-14 Tomcat, he was assigned to Fighter Squadron Two (VF-2) from October 1981 to January 1985 aboard the USS Ranger and USS Kitty Hawk. While assigned to VF-2 Rominger attended the Navy Fighter Weapons School (Topgun). In 1987 he completed the Naval Postgraduate School/Test Pilot School Cooperative Program, and was assigned as F-14 Project Officer to the Carrier Suitability Branch of the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate at Patuxent River, Maryland. During his tour of duty Rominger completed the initial carrier suitability sea trials of the F-14B, logging the first aircraft carrier arrestment and catapult launch in the upgraded Tomcat. In September 1990 he reported to Fighter Squadron Two Hundred Eleven (VF-211) where he served as Operations Officer and completed a Desert Storm Deployment to the Arabian Gulf aboard USS Nimitz.

He has logged over 7,000 flying hours in over 35 types of aircraft and 685 carrier landings.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in March 1992, Rominger reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1992. He completed one year of training and is qualified for assignment as a pilot on future Space Shuttle flight crews. Rominger was initially assigned to work technical issues for the Astronaut Office Operations Development Branch. He also served as Chief of the Astronaut Office Shuttle Operations Branch, Deputy Director, Flight Crew Operations, and Chief of the Astronaut Corps. .A veteran of five space flights, Rominger logged over 1,600 hours in space. He flew as pilot on STS-73 (1995), STS-80 (1996) and STS-85 (1997), and was the crew commander on STS-96 (1999) and STS-100 (2001). In April 2005 he retired from the Navy. Rominger retired from NASA in September 2006 to accept a position with ATK Launch Systems, Utah.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-73 Columbia (October 20 to November 5, 1995) was the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission. The mission focused on materials science, biotechnology, combustion science, the physics of fluids, and numerous scientific experiments housed in the pressurized Spacelab module. In completing his first space flight, Rominger orbited the earth 256 times, traveled over 6 million miles, and logged a total of 15 days, 21 hours, and 52 minutes in space.

STS-80 Columbia (November 19 to December 7, 1996) was a 17-day mission during which the crew deployed and retrieved the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) and the Orbiting Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (ORFEUS) satellites. The free-flying WSF created a super vacuum in its wake and grew thin film wafers for use in semiconductors and other high-tech electrical components. The ORFEUS instruments, mounted on the reusable Shuttle Pallet Satellite, studied the origin and makeup of stars. In completing his second space flight, Rominger orbited the earth a record 278 times, traveled over 7 million miles and logged 17 days, 15 hours and 53 minutes in space.

STS-85 Discovery (August 7-19, 1997) was a 12-day mission during which the crew deployed and retrieved the CRISTA-SPAS satellite, operated the Japanese Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD) robotic arm, studied changes in the Earths atmosphere and tested technology destined for use on the future International Space Station. The mission was accomplished in 189 Earth orbits, traveling 4.7 million miles in 11 days, 20 hours and 27 minutes.

STS-96 Discovery (May 27 to June 6, 1999) was a 10-day mission during which the crew delivered 4 tons of logistics and supplies to the International Space Station in preparation for the arrival of the first crew to live on the station. The mission included the first docking of a Space Shuttle to the International Space Station and was accomplished in 153 Earth orbits, traveling 4 million miles in 9 days, 19 hours and 13 minutes.

STS-100 Endeavour (April 19 to May 1, 2001) was a 12-day mission during which the crew installed the Canadian-built Robotic Arm and the Rafaello Logistics Module to the International Space Station. Endeavour was docked 8-days on the most complex robotics flight in the history of the Space Shuttle program and was made up of a very diverse international crew, representing the United States, Russia, Canada and Italy. The mission was completed in 187 Earth orbits, traveling 4.9 million miles in 11 days, 21 hours and 30 minutes.



Film Credits
2012 Here I Stand (Other), 2002 Space Station 3D (in person)


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