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AMELIA M. EARHART - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED - HFSID 288297

AMELIA EARHART Writing from England two days after her trans-Atlantic flight, she tells an uncle how surprised she is by all the publicity, and hopes it hasn't affected the family too much. Autograph Letter signed: "Amelia", 1 page, 7x9, also initialed by her on a postscript in right margin.

Sale Price $14,400.00

Reg. $16,000.00

Condition: fine condition
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AMELIA EARHART
Writing from England two days after her trans-Atlantic flight, she tells an uncle how surprised she is by all the publicity, and hopes it hasn't affected the family too much.
Autograph Letter signed: "Amelia", 1 page, 7x9, also initialed by her on a postscript in right margin. London, no written date, but 1928 June 20. On letterhead of Aldford House, Park Lane, to "Dear Uncle", in full: "As you saw this morning I haven't much time to myself. My program is filled for me and I have to adhere to it or be swamped with invitations. So ...[ellipses in original] I am sorry not to have been able to see you longer. There is hardly a chance that I shall be able to do so while here, as I leave so soon for home. I do hope the family does not feel the awful publicity too much. I had no idea people would be so interested, and am quite overcome. Sincerely". [signature] I hope I may drop in at 137 on my way to Boston, if I may. A. E." Amelia Earhart (1897-1937?), with Wilman Stutz and Louis Gordon, flew from Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland to Burry Port, Wales (June 17-18, 1928) to become the first woman to cross the Atlantic by air. On June 19, she flew a private plane (which she later purchased) to Southampton, England, and an enthusiastic welcome. That same day, she received a telegram from her uncle, Clarence W. Bates, who was briefly in London, congratulating her and inquiring where they could meet. (The above letter is her reply.) The reaction in American was equally enthusiastic. Earhart would be honored there with a ticker tape parade in New York City and a White House dinner with President Coolidge. Four years later, Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic when she flew from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland to Londonderry, Ireland on May 20-21, 1932, exactly five years after Lindbergh accomplished a similar feat from New York to Paris. She established other aviation records that did not include "woman", such as first Hawaii-to-mainland solo (1935) and first Mexico City-to-New York flight (1935). The unexplained disappearance of Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan (July 1, 1937) over the Pacific on their attempted round the world flight remains a topic of intense debate and speculation. Multiple mailing folds. Lightly toned. Otherwise, fine condition.

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