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AMELIA M. EARHART - COMMEMORATIVE ENVELOPE SIGNED CIRCA 1932 CO-SIGNED BY: WALTER E. LEES, JAMES H. STICKLER, MARY "MAY/MAE" HAIZLIP, FREDERICK A. BROSSY, BRIGADIER GENERAL JAMES H. "JIMMY" DOOLITTLE, KENNETH W. SCHOLTER, H. LLOYD CHILD, COLONEL FRANK ALLEN KURTZ, EDNA M. RANDOLPH - HFSID 291604

AVIATION PIONEERS: AMELIA EARHART, JIMMY DOOLITTLE and OTHER AVIATION RECORD-SETTERS Ten signatures on this airmail envelope commemprating an event sponsored by the Aero Club of Washington, welcoming record-setters of 1931 Commemorative Envelope Signed: "J. H. Doolittle", "May Haizlip", "Frederic A. Brossy", "Walter E.

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AVIATION PIONEERS: AMELIA EARHART, JIMMY DOOLITTLE and OTHER AVIATION RECORD-SETTERS
Ten signatures on this airmail envelope commemprating an event sponsored by the Aero Club of Washington, welcoming record-setters of 1931
Commemorative Envelope Signed: "J. H. Doolittle", "May Haizlip", "Frederic A. Brossy", "Walter E. Lees", "Edna M. Rudolph", "James H. Stickler", "Frank A. Kurtz", "H. L. Child", "Kenneth W. Scholter" and "Amelia Earhart", 6½x3¾. Airmail envelope postmarked Washington, D.C., January 30, 1932. Names written over printed caption on left side: "The Aero Club of Washington Welcomes the American Aviators World Record Makers of 1931". AMELIA EARHART (1897-1937), with Wilman Stutz and Louis Gordon, flew from Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland to Burry Port, Wales (June 17-18, 1928) to become the first woman to cross the Atlantic by air. Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic when she flew from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland to Londonderry, Ireland on May 20-21, 1932, exactly five years after Lindbergh accomplished a similar feat from New York to Paris. She established other aviation records that did not include "woman", such as first Hawaii-to-mainland solo and first Mexico City-to-New York flight (both 1935). In 1937, Earhart was lost over the Pacific in an attempted around-the-world flight. In 1922, JAMES "JIMMY" DOOLITTLE (1896-1993) made the first transcontinental flight in less than 24 hours. In the 1920s and 1930s, he set various speed and flight records, and pioneered air mail delivery. During WWII, Doolittle, a veteran of WWI, and 79 other fighter pilots ("Doolittle's Raiders") bombed Tokyo on April 18, 1942, the first air attack on the Japanese capital. Also hit were targets in Yokohama and other cities, scoring a huge victory for U.S. morale at a time when Japan's position in the Pacific seemed impregnable. Doolittle was promoted to Brigadier General the next day and was later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the raid. After retiring from the military at the end of WWII, Doolittle was an executive with Shell Oil until his retirement in 1959. MARY "MAY" HAIZLIP learned to fly from her husband, a World War I flight instructor. In 1931, she set a women's speed record (225 mph), which stood for 7 years. That same year, she competed in 8 races, winning one and finishing second in the other seven. Later she was a test pilot for Spartan Aircraft and other firms. FREDERICK A. BROSSY (1899-1961) and WALTER E. LEES (1902-1974), former US military pilots, were test pilots for Packard in 1931 when they set a non-refueled flight endurance record, staying in the air for 84½ hours. Lees was also a barnstormer. EDNA RUDOLPH (later PAUL, 1910-1999) set the world altitude record in 1931: 13,924' in an open cockpit, fabric aircraft possessing no heater or supplemental oxygen. She was amused that her photo with Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart made the front page of the New York Times because "they were famous." FRANK A. KURTZ (1911-1996), a flyer from age 16, set a world speed record in 1935 for a flight from Los Angeles to Mexico City and on to Washington. Kurtz won a bronze medal in platform diving at the 1932 Olympic Games. A highly decorated bomber pilot in the Pacific during World War II, he named his daughter, actress Swoosie Kurtz (b. 1944) after his B-17. H. LLOYD CHILD was a test pilot for Curtiss-Wright, billed as "the world's fastest human." He tested fighter aircraft preparing for use in World War II, especially the P-40 Warhawk. KENNETH W. SCHOLTER (b. 1910) founded the first privately owned and operated airfield in Pennsylvania. His extensive collection of early aviation photographs is housed at the Hines Pittsburgh Regional History Museum. No information is available on James H. Stickler. Toned. Slightly worn at edges and corners. Fine condition.

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