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BOOKER T. WASHINGTON - MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED 10/28/1901 - HFSID 175416

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON Booker T. Washington sends a manuscript letter about his last report to the board of trustees. Manuscript Letter Signed: "Booker T. Washington" as President of Tuskegee Institute, 1p, 6x9½. Tuskegee, Alabama, 1901 October 28.

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BOOKER T. WASHINGTON
Booker T. Washington sends a manuscript letter about his last report to the board of trustees.
Manuscript Letter Signed: "Booker T. Washington" as President of Tuskegee Institute, 1p, 6x9½. Tuskegee, Alabama, 1901 October 28. On letterhead of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute Incorporated for the Training of Colored Young Men and Women to Rev. J.C. Alvord, Woonsocket, R.I. Begins: "Kind Friend". In full: "Enclosed I send you a copy of my last report to the board of trustees. I hope that you may find time to read it. May I thank you again for your help and interest." Booker T. Washington signed below his comments about his son. Booker T. "Baker" Washington Jr. (1887-1945). Along with his general education, Baker, so called to distinguish him from his father, was interested in a brick-maker's trade from an early age: Baker began the road to mastering this trade at Tuskegee when he was enrolled in the training school in 1893. In the early 1900's, Washington Sr. published his autobiography, Up from Slavery (1901). By this time in his life, he had established milestones for the education of black people. Washington had been selected to oversee the development of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in 1881; it became his life's work and a monument to his efforts. He became the Institute's first president (1881) and its accredited founder. He expanded upon two dilapidated buildings with no equipment until his death, at which time the campus included more than 100 well-equipped buildings, 200 teachers - including the agricultural genius. George Washington Carver - and an endowment of nearly $2,000,000.00 Washington believed education and a practical trade would enable blacks to progress and contribute to society. He became a great lecturer and spokesman of the Negro and constantly endeavored to improve their situation. Shaded at folds, nicked at lower horizontal fold at left and right margins. Silked on verso.

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