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CAMILLE PISSARRO - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 12/27/1892 - HFSID 284372

CAMILLE PISSARRO The painter signs a richly detailed, 4-page handwritten letter to his wife Julie (1892), discussing business and family affairs, and expressing frustration at mail delays Autograph Letter signed: "C. Pissarro", 4 pages (front and verso), 4½x7.

Sale Price $10,200.00

Reg. $12,000.00

Condition: fine condition
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CAMILLE PISSARRO The painter signs a richly detailed, 4-page handwritten letter to his wife Julie (1892), discussing business and family affairs, and expressing frustration at mail delays Autograph Letter signed: "C. Pissarro", 4 pages (front and verso), 4½x7. Eragny (France), 1892 December 27. To"My dear Julie". In French, translated in full: "One cannot rely on the punctuality of the mail these days; would you believe that your letter to Lise only arrived here yesterday, thus too late to be communicated in time; I hope that you were nevertheless on time at your aunt's. Something else even more extraordinary, I received yesterday the letter that you sent to Lucien on Saturday, the imbeciles at the Hotel who know my name, even though Lucien is staying with them, still sent the letter to me; I thought it would be useless to send it back because it would have come back to me, and besides it was too late. The 2 p.m. train just came by, nobody. Lucien wrote that he would perhaps miss it and would be on the 3:45. I enclose herewith a letter from Mrs. Mirbeau that must be answered. Peissier writes to me that the notary in Chaumont agrees to smaller fees and will have Edoline sign a promise to receive the six thousand francs in three months or perhaps in one month. That will mean another fee to pay but it will not be much. What do you think of the letter that Georges wrote about Lucien. I thought it was not very nice of him. In fact I told him that it was not the right moment to make fun of Lucien when he is the one who was wrong when he sent a postcard to Titi to this address - Mr. Felix c/o Lucien Pissarro! What is the matter with him? Those are children's games, for sure! But please!!... The ironing woman came today, which surprised me, but I hear that Esterbee asked her to come by, she is ironing drapes. Anyway, Maria will give her what Esterbee wanted her to iron. Good God! If she lets her ironing woman do her thing, she will be well served. Too bad, I don't understand anything. What bad weather! I worked hard yesterday and this morning, despite the stove that seems to be on its last leg. I have a letter from Georges for Titi; since he is supposed to come and I am not sure of the speed of the mail, I am keeping it for him. Rodolphe is very well; Maria keeps up with her things. Please give our love to the children and to Mimi. Compliments to aunt and uncle." [signature]"Peissier told me that you must copy your will on a 1F20 sheet of paper. It does not have to be done in the presence of a witness, as with me; try to have it done before he leaves and let him know, he will leave around the 3rd or 4th of January, you could find out by writing to him. I think it would be a wise thing to do. Don't worry about the ironing woman, she just told me that she knows what to do, that you explained it to her. Lucien arrived on the 6 p.m. train with Aunt Ora and Esther." Camille Pissarro (1830-1903), born in the French Virgin Islands, was a groundbreaking French impressionists painter known for his urban and rural scenes and his portrayals of working people. In his middle years as an artist, he pioneered the distinctive style known as pointillism. A patriarch among the impressionists, Pissarro mentored Cézanne and Gaugin. He married Julie Vellay, originally a maid in his mother's household; they had eight children. All six children who survived to adulthood painted, in particular his son Lucien, mentioned in this letter, who became an artist of note. Pissarro moved to Eragny, 16 miles northwest of central Paris, in 1884, living there until his death. In his day, Eragny still offered rural landscapes, and many of his best known works were painted there. A few months after this letter was written, a large-scale retrospective exhibition increased his international fame and popularity. Partial separation along hinge. Scattered light toning, heavier to first page. Several small pencil notations. Some faint show-through from writing on opposing sides. Overall, fine condition.

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