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CHARLES D. COBURN - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 11/15/1948 CO-SIGNED BY: PEDRO DE CORDOBA, THURSTON HALL, CHARLES HALTON, RAYMOND GRIFFITH, JOSEPH SANTLEY, GENE LOCKHART, RAYMOND WALBURN, EMMETT C. KING, CLIFFORD BROOKE - HFSID 13628

CHARLES COBURN, CO-SIGNED BY: PEDRO de CORDOBA, RAYMOND GRIFFITH, THURSTON HALL, CHARLES HALTON, GENE LOCKHART, JOSEPH SANTLEY, EMMETT C. KING, RAYMOND WALBURN and CLIFFORD BROOKE This letter to painter and

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CHARLES COBURN, CO-SIGNED BY: PEDRO de CORDOBA, RAYMOND GRIFFITH, THURSTON HALL, CHARLES HALTON, GENE LOCKHART, JOSEPH SANTLEY, EMMETT C. KING, RAYMOND WALBURN and CLIFFORD BROOKE
This letter to painter and illustrator Joseph Cummings Chase, typed on The Players West Room letterhead in 1948, is signed by Oscar-winning actor Charles Coburn, Oscar nominee Gene Lockhart and actors Pedro de Cordoba, Raymond Griffith, Thurston Hall, Charles Halton, Joseph Santley, Emmett C. King, Raymond Walburn and Clifford Brooke.
Typed letter signed "Emmett King", "Charles Coburn", "Raymond Walburn", "Raymond Griffith", "Gene Lockhart", "Joseph Santley", "Thurston Hall.", "Chas Halton", "Clifford Brooke" and "Pedro de Cordoba" in blue and black inks. With 18 unidentified signatures. 1 page, 8½x9½, on letterhead of the Players West Room in Los Angeles, California. Mounted to a same-size sheet of paper. Nov. 15, 1948. Addressed to Mr. Joseph Cummings Chase, New York City. In full: Dear Joe:- Word cannot express the joy in the West Room tonight at the unveiling of your loving gift which now cheers us from behind the bar. It will be conducive to much conviviality. Your artistry grows richer with the years, and my your years be never numbered! Our love to you, Your pals,". JOSEPH CUMMINGS CHASE (1878-1965) was an American portrait painter and illustrator. Broadway actor, producer and director CHARLES COBURN (1877-1961), born Charles Douville Coburn, did not appear in his first feature film (Of Human Hearts) until 1938, when he was 61. In 1940, he portrayed Dr. Henry Gordon, who unjustly amputated Drake McHugh's (Ronald Reagan) legs in Kings Row, resulting in the future President's greatest screen line (and title of his first autobiography): "Where's the rest of me?" Coburn was nominated for three Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor (1941, The Devil and Miss Jones; 1943, The More the Merrier; 1946, The Green Years). He won in 1943 for his portrayal of elderly Benjamin Dingle, a likable business executive forced by the wartime housing shortage to share a Washington D.C. apartment with Jean Arthur and Joel McCrea. Canadian actor GENE LOCKHART (1891-1957) was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in 1938's Algiers. He first appeared on stage at age 6 and logged a total of 16 acting and writing credits on Broadway, including performances in the original Broadway production of Eugene O'Neill's Ah, Wilderness! (1933-1934) and as Lee J. Cobb's replacement in the original Broadway production of Death of a Salesman (1949-1950). He started acting in movies in 1922 and appeared in over 140 movies and TV shows between then and 1957. Memorable performances include the judge in A Miracle on 34th Street (1947). Lockhart was the husband of actress Kathleen Lockhart (they appeared as Mr. and Mrs. Cratchit in 1938's A Christmas Carol) and the father of actress June Lockhart. Legend has it that American comedian RAYMOND WALBURN (1887-1969) inadvertently started his comic career during his debut in Shakespeare's laugh riot MacBeth, when his line "Fillet of a fenny snake" came out as "Fillet of a funny snake". He had over 20 Broadway appearances between 1911 and 1964. Most of the early ones were flops until he hit pay dirt with Come Out of the Kitchen (and, later, as Erronious in the original Broadway production of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, 1962-1964). He also had over 90 movies and TV shows to his credit between 1916 and 1958. Walburn's loveable con man schtick made him a favorite of Frank Capra (Broadway Bill, 1934; Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, 1936; State of the Union, 1948; Riding High,1950) and Preston Sturges (Christmas in July, 1940; Hail the Conquering Hero, 1944; The Sin of Harold Diddlebock, 1950). Veteran American actor PEDRO de CORDOBA (1881-1950) was classically trained for the stage - he had almost 50 Broadway appearances between 1902 and 1935, with numerous Shakespearean roles - before making his film debut in 1915's Carmen. In all, he had over 120 movies and TV shows on his resume, mostly in supporting roles. His best remembered role is probably that of a sideshow "living skeleton" who hides an on-the-run Robert Cummings in 1942's Saboteur. De Cordoba's priestly demeanor on screen wasn't an accident; he was a devout Catholic and even president of the Catholic Actors Guild of American for a time. You probably know silent film comedian RAYMOND GRIFFITH (1895-1957) best for his last (and incidentally uncredited) role as a bayoneted French soldier in All Quiet on the Western Front (1930). And that's a shame, because his acting career, which spans back to when he was 15 months old, included over 70 movies between 1915 and 1930. He made his name in stonefaced comedic performances, of which Hands Up (1927) is arguably his masterpiece. The advent of sound ruined his career (he had no voice, a result of straining his voice too much in childhood), but he just shifted to screenwriting and producing after All Quiet on the Western Front. The very definition of a trouper, American actor THURSTON HALL (1882-1958) had a career spanning six decades. He got his start in New England's stock theatres before graduating to Broadway, where he appeared in over 20 productions between 1905 and 1935. Hall made the jump to movies in 1915 and to TV in 1950. In all he has a staggering 260 TV shows and movies to his credit, with recurring roles as Diet Smith on Dick Tracy (1950), Mr. Schuyler on Topper (1953-1954), and Harrison Prentice on The Adventures of Hiram Holliday (1956-1957). Like many actors who began their movie careers during the silent era, CHARLES HALTON (1876-1969) got his start as a stage actor, with 33 Broadway productions to his credit between 1901 and 1950. He was a particular favorite of George S. Kaufman and appeared in at least four of Kaufman's Broadway plays: Once in a Lifetime (1930-1931), Merrily We Roll Along (1934-1935), Tomorrow's a Holiday (1935-1936) and The Enchanted (1950). He moved to films in 1917 and appeared in almost 190 movies and TV shows until 1958 - often as someone who's tried to make life miserable for the heroes, like a greedy landlord or shyster attorney. But Hollywood occasionally let him play more human characters, like the Polish stage manager in To Be or Not To Be (1942) and the court clerk in Alfred Hitchcock's Mr. and Mrs. Smith (1942). Multi-talented actor, director, producer, writer and choreographer JOSEPH SANTLEY (1890-1971) got his acting start on stage in summer stock and touring shows as a child. He appeared in a total of 21 Broadway plays between 1906 and 1928, mostly in musical comedies and with occasional writing, choreographing and even directing duties. Santley moved to movies in 1928; in all, he directed almost 90 movies and TV shows between 1928 and 1958, including the Marx Brothers' first film The Cocoanuts (1929) and three of Gene Autry's films at Republic: Melody Ranch (1940), Down Mexico Way (1941) and Call of the Canyon (1942). He was also a producer; among his producing credits are The Mickey Rooney Show (1954-1955). American actor EMMETT C. KING (1865-1953) got his start on the stage. He appeared five times on Broadway between 1899 and 1913, including the 1899 farce The Father of His Country, which he wrote, before moving to films. Altogether, he appeared in almost 80 films between 1917 and 1944, with supporting cast appearances in Kismet (1920), Little Lord Fauntleroy (1921), The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) and The Man in the Iron Mask (1939). British director and actor CLIFFORD BROOKE (1873-1951) got his start on stage, with directing and acting credits in 36 Broadway productions between 1916 and 1939). He started appearing in movies in 1940, mostly in bit parts as white collar characters, and managed to collect a total of 25 TV shows and movies on his resume before dying in a car accident in 1951. Lightly toned and creased. Show through from adhesive on verso touches signatures. Some signatures touch. Light tear at bottom edge. Tackholes in top right corners. Paper mounted to letter has mounting residue on verso (no show-through). Folded twice and unfolded. Otherwise in fine condition.

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