loading..

CHARLES J. GUITEAU - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED 06/12/1874 - HFSID 306810

CHARLES J. GUITEAU A struggling lawyer, the future assassin of President Garfield signed this New York Superior Court document as a plaintiff's attorney Autograph Document signed: "Charles J. Guiteau/Plffs Atty", 1 page, 8x7. City and County of New York, 1874 June 12.

Sale Price $1,360.00

Reg. $1,600.00

Condition: See item description
Our Authentication Guarantee (PSA / JSA)
Free U.S. Shipping
Chat now or call 800-425-5379

CHARLES J. GUITEAU A struggling lawyer, the future assassin of President Garfield signed this New York Superior Court document as a plaintiff's attorney Autograph Document signed: "Charles J. Guiteau/Plffs Atty", 1 page, 8x7. City and County of New York, 1874 June 12. In part: "Charles J. Guiteau, being duly [?] says that he is the plaintiffs attorney herein and that the allegations contained in the Answer and Counterclaim herein are true of his own knowledge except as to the matter therein stated upon information and belief and as to the matter he believes to be true as he has been so informed by said plaintiffs and also by said defendant as to what is the reason this supposition is made by the plaintiffs." Lower left bears endorsement and signature of Notary "William Sinclair". Docketed on verso (unknown hand): "NY Supreme Court, Andrew Gluck and James K. Spratt/Copy/Reply to answer and counterclaim. When he signed this document, Charles Guiteau (1844-1882), unsuccessful in a small legal firm in Chicago, had moved to New York. Unable to find work on a newspaper, Guiteau unhappily returned to the practice of law. Divorced by his wife soon thereafter, Guiteau, despondent and struggling financially, involved himself in the 1880 Presidential campaign, writing a speech on behalf of James Garfield which the Republic Party published and gave some limited circulation. Guiteau credited himself with having secured Garfield's election, and hounded the staff of the President-elect for a diplomatic appointment. Firmly rebuffed by incoming Secretary of State James Blaine, Guiteau decided to assassinate Garfield. After much preparation, he shot the President on July 2, 1881. Garfield finally died on September 2, as much a victim of poor medical practices as of Guiteau's bullet, and the assassin was charged with murder. The delusional Guiteau believed that God had commanded him to slay the President. The insanity defense was used for the first time at his trial. Guiteau, however, was found guilty on January 25, 1882, and executed by hanging on June 30. Garfield had campaigned for civil service reform, balancing the Republican ticket with Chester Arthur, a "Stalwart" defender of the old patronage system. Garfield's murder by a disappointed office seeker caused President Arthur to reverse course, supporting and then signing the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act of 1883. Small separation to one horizontal fold. Paper loss to lower right corner, not affecting any of the text. Light show-through from docketing on verso. Otherwise, fine condition.

This website image may contain our company watermark. The actual item does not contain this watermark

See more listings from these signers
Make an offer today and get a quick response
Check your account for the status.

Following offer submission users will be contacted at their account email address within 48 hours. Our response will be to accept your offer, decline your offer or send you a final counteroffer. All offers can be viewed from within the "Document Offers" area of your HistoryForSale account. Please review the Make Offer Terms prior to making an offer.

If you have not received an offer acceptance or counter-offer email within 24-hours please check your spam/junk email folder.

 

World-Wide Shipping

Fast FedEx and USPS shipping

Authenticity Guaranteed

COA with every purchase

Questions Answered 24/7

Contact us day or night

Submit Offers

Get a quick response