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CLARA BARTON - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 12/15/1894 - HFSID 47972

CLARA BARTON Clara Barton sends an autograph letter to a friend discussing the news. Autograph Letter Signed: "Clara Barton", 1p, front and verso, 8½x11 lined The American National Red Cross letterhead. Washington, D. C., 1894 December 15. To Miss Marion E. Balcorn, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Sale Price $935.00

Reg. $1,100.00

Condition: lightly soiled, otherwise fine condition
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CLARA BARTON
Clara Barton sends an autograph letter to a friend discussing the news.
Autograph Letter Signed: "Clara Barton", 1p, front and verso, 8½x11 lined The American National Red Cross letterhead. Washington, D. C., 1894 December 15. To Miss Marion E. Balcorn, Worcester, Massachusetts. In full: "Just a few minutes before the breakfast bell rings I can get to tell you a few of the little nothings that -surround us- and thank you for your letter of last week. I suppose by this time you have donned your white and orange [illegible] and seen others made happy and been made happy yourself in making them so. It is remarkable for a N. E. family to continue its ancestral domain through so many generations, I fancy that Dartin is [illegible] and will find his best happiness through life in this steady course. I hope a good choice will make a happy life for both, and that you will find your satisfaction in their future- We are moving on as usual, doing some little publishing - Report not made yet- Steve' and family all in Boston, all but the Pussy cat - he stay s here - Don't know how long they intend to remain north or indeed, if permanently. The winter is very mild so far - not a flake of snow yet and little ice. Water pipes all free as summer. The season has commenced - congress is here ands receptions are in order. We are in for a course of musical entertainments at the Brazilian Ministries once in two weeks- one, the second, -tonight - I have not named a day yet to receive - must do it soon- No one is here at present but Dr. Hubball and Mr. Pullman, both working hard- I have not heard from Ida in some time- I know Steve went to see her. That would be joy enough for her for a month- I am so glad that your mamma's health holds good, and that you are not overworking, but keeping in a way to enjoy yourself and the pleasures of the reason as they come to you. Please remember me in much love to my dear cousin Mrs. Conver. I often think of her and would like to tell her of the visit I made in October to our Elizabeth town curious up in the Adirondacks - The family of Judge and Larince Stone Hale - I presume she has never seen any of them, they would know her very well- they keep very close touch with the stone relabirues - The Bell rings- my paper is at an end and so must be my subbing for this morning- with love to all yours off ". Fold creases through signature. Otherwise, fine condition. Included addressed 5¾x3¾ mailing envelope. Lightly soiled. Clara Barton (1821-1912), who had served on the battlefields of the Civil War, became acquainted with the International Red Cross of Geneva while working abroad during the Franco-Prussian conflict and established the American Red Cross in 1882. She served as the organization's President until June 16, 1904, when she resigned from her "lifelong presidency". In April 1905, the year before this document was signed, Barton, who had originally planned to organized a Red Cross in Mexico, founded the National First Aid Association of America, which taught first aid classes (likely the reason for the Diplomas mentioned in this letter), developed the original first aid kits and helped to organize community ambulance brigades. She would serve as the organization's honorary President for five years. In 1907, The Story of My Childhood, the first and only volume of her planned multi-volume autobiography, was published. In 1891, Edward and Edwin Baltzley had built a three-story, 30-room home in Glen Echo, Maryland for Barton. Remodeled in 1897 as the headquarters of the American Red Cross, the home temporarily served as a warehouse and was crammed with thousands of items to assist victims of wars and natural disasters. Barton would live in the home until her death. Two items.

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