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COLONEL WILLIAM A. HOWARD - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 09/04/1856 - HFSID 174707

While discussing fundraising for the state of Maine with Senator Fessenden, Howard figuratively states in this letter, "I have killed [Millard] Fillmore in Massachusetts...Rest time for M.F. & the boys."

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Reg. $625.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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COLONEL WILLIAM A. HOWARD (CIVIL WAR)
While discussing fundraising for the state of Maine with Senator Fessenden, Howard figuratively states in this letter, "I have killed [Millard] Fillmore in Massachusetts...Rest time for M.F. & the boys."
Autograph Letter signed: "Howard", 2 pages, 5x8. Astor House, 4 September 1856. To "Dear Pitt" [U.S. Senator] William Pitt Fessenden, Portland, Maine. In full: "Write me a letter showing in strong terms the wants of Maine. I wish but should it be to a D/ permissions committee who have some way or another got a kink into their blockheads that the needful is not de-guised with you. I, having been called upon by a Member of that Committee by advice on the matter, desire to be tacked up by Jno. It takes the humble to do this. Many applications have been made for funds when they know they are not requisite. For states comes under the head. I fear. Had you had then written Jno as you promised, I think/provided the money is [illegible] I could have raised//5000$. However write me & to strengthen me, ask me to come with it. I can't go for I am engaged else where. I flatter myself. I have killed M. Fillmore in Massachusetts --[illegible] that's for when we meet. Want to very next mail. If you want money, If grim don't go to guess. Tell me where Wm is! I have not the time to ask for him when he's least well. Ever Dear Pitt. Your brother and affectionate" and postscript, "Rest time for M. F & the boys." William A. HOWARD (1807-1871) was a veteran Coast Guard officer who commanded a detachment of marine artillery during battles on the Carolina coast during the Civil War. At the beginning of the war, he was commissioned as a Colonel of the 1st New York Heavy Artillery in the defenses around Portsmouth & Norfolk. Earlier in his career, when he commanded the revenue cutter Jackson, he was said to look so resplendent in his Coast Guard uniform that naval officers pressured Navy Secretary Levi Woodbury to remove epaulettes from Coast Guard uniforms. In the years before the Civil War, he was in private business as a shipbuilder. William Pitt FESSENDEN (1806-1869) had resigned a seat in the U.S. Senate to assume, at the personal behest of President Lincoln, the Cabinet post of Treasury Secretary after the resignation of Secretary Chase. Fessenden, who as Chairman the important Senate Finance Committee (1861-1864) had played an important role in raising revenues for the Union cause, but he served at Treasury for only eight months (July 5, 1864 - March 3, 1865). Thereafter he returned to the Senate, becoming chairman of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction. Lightly creased. File holes at left edge. Toned . Ink note (unknown hand) on verso of last page. Otherwise, fine condition.

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