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CORETTA SCOTT KING - FIRST DAY COVER SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: MARIAN ANDERSON - HFSID 291789

CORETTA SCOTT KING and MARIAN ANDERSON Both sign a First Day Cover honoring American women First Day Cover signed: "Coretta Scott King", "Marian Anderson/9/13/'73", 6½x3¾. FDC honoring American Women, postmarked Washington, D.C., June 2, 1960, 4-cent stamp affixed. FIRST DAY OF ISSUE.

Sale Price $480.00

Reg. $600.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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CORETTA SCOTT KING and MARIAN ANDERSON
Both sign a First Day Cover honoring American women
First Day Cover signed: "Coretta Scott King", "Marian Anderson/9/13/'73", 6½x3¾. FDC honoring American Women, postmarked Washington, D.C., June 2, 1960, 4-cent stamp affixed. FIRST DAY OF ISSUE. Ink note (unknown hand) also dates Mrs. King's signature from 1973. CORETTA SCOTT (1927-2006) married Martin Luther KING, Jr. on June 18, 1953, little knowing that he was soon to make his mark among the leaders of the nation. King first became involved in Civil Rights during the Montgomery (Alabama) Transit Boycott (1955-1956), which made him a national hero and the unprecedented leader of the modern Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. King, an ardent supporter of her husband's work, endured threats and bombings before the assassination of her husband in Memphis on April 4, 1968. After his death, she became a dynamic Civil Rights leader and crusader for peace in her own right, leading the 20th anniversary March on Washington (1983) and speaking out for the rights of Blacks in America and in South Africa. In 1969, Mrs. King, the mother of four children, founded the Atlanta-based Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, which carries on Dr. King's teachings of nonviolent social protest. MARIAN ANDERSON (1899-1993), a contralto who sang both operas and spirituals, began her concert career in 1924 and debuted with the Philadelphia Philharmonic in 1925. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow Anderson, a Black American, to perform in Washington, D.C.'s Constitution Hall. In response, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the D.A.R. and arranged for a concert at the Lincoln Memorial. Anderson, the first Black performer to debut with New York's Metropolitan Opera (1955), later became a permanent member of the company. The late conductor Arturo Toscanini commented of Anderson, "A voice like hers comes once in a century." In 2005, she was honored on a 37-cent postage stamp. Lightly creased. Otherwise, fine condition.

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