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DR. MICHAEL E. DEBAKEY - COLLECTION WITH DR. DENTON A. COOLEY, CHRISTIAAN BARNARD - HFSID 348007

HEART SURGERY PIONEERS: CHRISTIAAN BARNARD, DENTON COOLEY and MICHAEL DEBAKEY The three surgeons signed these items, all framed together with black and white photographs and a plaque! Comprises: (1) CHRISTIAAN BARNARD. Signature: "Chris Barnard", 4½x1½.

Sale Price $1,360.00

Reg. $1,600.00

Condition: fine condition
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HEART SURGERY PIONEERS: CHRISTIAAN BARNARD, DENTON COOLEY and MICHAEL DEBAKEY The three surgeons signed these items, all framed together with black and white photographs and a plaque! Comprises: (1) CHRISTIAAN BARNARD. Signature: "Chris Barnard", 4½x1½. Ink smudged at the upper portion of the "C". Fine condition. (2) DENTON COOLEY. Signature: "Denton A. Cooley MD", 4¾x2½. Dated 3.26-78 above signature. Fine condition. (3) MICHAEL DEBAKEY. First Day Cover signed: "Michael E De Bakey", 6¼x3½. FDC honoring the Crusade Against Cancer, 5-cent stamp affixed, postmarked Washington, D.C., April 1, 1965, FIRST DAY OF ISSUE. Lightly rippled at cachet. Fine condition. South African cardiothoracic surgeon CHRISTIAAN BARNARD (1922-2001) performed the world's first heart transplant at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town on December 3, 1967. The patient, 53-year-old dentist Louis Washkansky, lived 18 days before succumbing to rejection of the new heart. After Washkansky died, Barnard and his team persevered with their innovative surgical procedure. His second transplant patient, Philip Blaiberg, lived for 18 months after the operation, and the survival time of patients has increased ever since. Today, 90% of patients survive a heart transplant operation, with an 85% chance of living for a year and a 70-75% chance of living for five years. Barnard's longest-surviving patient, Dirk van Zyl, lived with an implanted heart for 23 years before dying in 1996 of diabetes unrelated to his heart condition. Barnard, who developed new designs for artificial heart valves earlier in his career, served as head of the cardiac unit of Groote Schuur Hospital until his retirement from surgery in 1983. The 78-year-old Barnard died from an asthma attack on September 2, 2001. Thoracic surgeon DENTON ARTHUR COOLEY (born in 1920), performed the first successful heart transplant in the U.S. (1968) and was the first surgeon to implant a total artificial heart in a human (1969). In 1962, he founded the Texas Heart Institute, of which he serves as President and Surgeon-in-Chief. Cooley and his associates have performed more than 100,000 open-heart surgeries, more than any other group in the world, and Dr. Cooley has shared his expertise as the co-author of more than 1,300 scientific articles and a dozen books. Another renowned thoracic surgeon, MICHAEL ELLIS DeBAKEY (born in 1908), developed the pump for the heart-lung machine in 1932, performed the first successful coronary bypass (1953) and was the first surgeon to successfully use an artificial heart pump as a left ventricular assist device in a patient (August 8, 1966 in Houston, Texas). DeBakey, who devised new cardiovascular surgical procedures, including developing Dacron artificial grafts for cardiac bypass surgery (1950-1953), and developed more than 50 instruments for the improvement of patient care, also successfully implanted a mechanical temporary heart substitute in 1967 and performed the first of his 12 heart transplants in 1968. DeBakey, the author of The Living Heart (1977) and The Living Heart Diet (1984), is also credited with developing the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (M.A.S.H.) concept for the military (1945), which saved countless lives during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. The famed surgeon and pioneer in cardiology, who celebrated his 90th birthday and 50 years with the Baylor College of Medicine and the Methodist Hospital in 1998, has been recognized with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1969), National Medal of Science (1987), Lifetime Achievement Award from the United Nations (1999) and NASA's Commercial Invention of the Year Award (2002) for the DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device, based in part on space shuttle technology, and was named a "Living Legend" by the U.S. Congress in 2000. Three items. Framed in the Gallery of History style: 37x22.

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