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D.W. (DAVID LEWELYN WARK) GRIFFITH - INSCRIBED SIGNATURE - HFSID 291419

D.W. GRIFFITH One of the pioneers of the American film industry signs a 5¼x4½ album leaf Inscribed signature: "To Syeline, D. W. Griffith", 5¼x4½ album leaf. American film director David Llewelyn Wark Griffith (1875-1948) was born in Crestwood, Kentucky.

Sale Price $510.00

Reg. $600.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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D.W. GRIFFITH One of the pioneers of the American film industry signs a 5¼x4½ album leaf Inscribed signature: "To Syeline, D. W. Griffith", 5¼x4½ album leaf. American film director David Llewelyn Wark Griffith (1875-1948) was born in Crestwood, Kentucky. Beginning his career as a playwright, Griffith went to New York in 1907 in hopes of selling a script. Instead he found himself working in several small acting parts. In 1908, while working with the American Mutoscope and Biograph company, Griffith was hired to direct The Adventures of Dollie. Griffith and Biograph were the first to shoot a film in Hollywood, California, the 1910 film In Old California. In 1914, he directed the film Judith of Bethulia (1914) one of the first feature films to be produced in the U.S. After leaving Biograph, who believed that full feature films were not commercially viable, Griffith went on to make his most influential and controversial film The Birth of a Nation (1915). The film is thought of historically as the first Blockbuster. Running at 190 minutes, its popularity broke the idea that longer films would not be received well by audiences. The Birth of a Nation would turn out to be the Birth of the Hollywood film industry as we know it today. However, the film, which depicted African Americans in a poor light, and its protagonists, the Ku-Klux-Klan, as the nation's saviors, was criticized by the NAACP and caused riots in northern cities. The criticism Griffith received for the film was responded with his 1917 Intolerance, a film which told the story of intolerance in four different historical periods. Along with Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, Griffith founded the United Artists film studio where he continued to make films. Some of his later films include Isn't Life Wonderful (1924), Lady of the Pavements (1929), Abraham Lincoln (1930) and The Struggle (1931). Charlie Chaplin once called Griffith "The teacher of us all" and Orson Welles once said "No town, no industry, no profession, no art form owes so much to a single man". Griffith's legacy lives on through film students, audiences and critics who still look to his work as a pioneer of the film industry. In 1953, the Directors Guild of America created the D.W. Griffith award as its highest honor and five of his films are preserved in the United States Film Registry. Edges lightly creased. Right edge irregularly cut. Ink note (unknown hand) on verso. Lightly toned. Otherwise, fine condition.

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