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EVERETT M. DIRKSEN - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 06/07/1966 - HFSID 320012

The Senator writes a letter to a constituent, thanking her for a kind letter received while staying at Walter Reed Hospital, and sending her a Congressional Directory listing the Governors of each state. Dirksen would pass away three years later at Walter Reed Hospital.

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Reg. $180.00

Condition: fine condition
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EVERETT M. DIRKSEN
The Senator writes a letter to a constituent, thanking her for a kind letter received while staying at Walter Reed Hospital, and sending her a Congressional Directory listing the Governors of each state. Dirksen would pass away three years later at Walter Reed Hospital.
Typed letter signed: "Everett M. Dirksen", in blue ink, 1 page, 8x10½. June 7, 1966. United States Senate. In full: "Dear Sandy: Many thanks for your letter of May 13. The doctors at Walter Reed are letting me out a part of every day with the aid of a wheel chair and crutches which will be my form of locomotion for awhile. I am glad to be back at the desk and truly appreciate your kind letter. With respect to your request, I am forwarding to you under separate cover a copy of the Congressional Directory. This contains a listing of the Governors of each State on page 353. They may all be reached by writing in care of the State Capital. With every good wish". Everett M. Dirksen (1896-1969) was U.S. Representative (1933-1949) and U.S. Senator (1951 until his death in 1969) from Illinois. He was the Republican Whip from 1957-1959 and Minority Leader from 1959-1969. As Minority Leader, Dirksen played a key role in the passage of the Voting Rights Act (1965) and the Fair Housing Act (1968). The historic Civil Rights Act of 1964 had to overcome opposition from southern Democrats and also from some Republicans, including the Party's 1964 Presidential nominee, Barry Goldwater. The crucial vote took place on June 10, 1964, when the Senate passed a cloture motion ending for the first time ever a civil rights filibuster. The two-thirds majority for cloture (71-29) would have been impossible without Dirksen's active support, which corralled some doubtful Midwestern Republicans. A fiscal conservative, he is also remembered for the quip, "A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon we're talking about real money!" Small notches on right side from binding. Corners slightly worn. Normal mailing folds. Light surface creases. Pencil notes (unknown hand) on verso. Otherwise, fine condition.

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