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FIRST LADY ELEANOR ROOSEVELT - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 12/27/1938 - HFSID 86028

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT Eleanor Roosevelt sends a typed letter of thanks for the flowers. Typed Letter Signed: "Eleanor Roosevelt" as First Lady, ¼p, 6x9¼. Washington, D.C., 1938 December 27. On White House letterhead to Mr. Bergman.

Sale Price $360.00

Reg. $400.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
Eleanor Roosevelt sends a typed letter of thanks for the flowers.
Typed Letter Signed: "Eleanor Roosevelt" as First Lady, ¼p, 6x9¼. Washington, D.C., 1938 December 27. On White House letterhead to Mr. Bergman. In full: "We were delighted with the box of lovely flowers which you sent to the President and me. Thank you so much for them and also for your holiday greetings." In the year she wrote this letter, the First Lady had made news when she not only supported the Southern Conference on Human Welfare (SCHW), but also attended the gathering in segregated Birmingham, Alabama. Informed by police officers that she could not sit with Mary McLeod Bethune because a city ordinance outlawed integrated seating, Mrs. Roosevelt demanded a chair and sat squarely between the aisles to demonstrate her displeasure with Jim Crow policies. And, in February 1939, less than two months after she signed this letter, Eleanor resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution over their refusal to allow Black singer Marian Anderson to perform in its auditorium. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) had married her distant cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1905 (her uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt, gave her away). She would serve as First Lady for 12 years and 39 days (March 4, 1933 until her husband's death of a cerebral hemorrhage on April 12, 1945), longer than any other woman. During her tenure as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt would break precedent by holding press conferences, traveling the country on her husband's behalf, lecturing, making radio broadcasts and writing a daily syndicated newspaper column, "My Day" (1935-1962). Eleanor, who had previously been First Lady of New York when FDR was Governor of the state (1929-1933), later became known as "First Lady of the World" for her humanitarian efforts, including getting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the United Nations. Appointed by President Truman, she had been a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations from 1945-1952. Lightly creased. Stained at upper blank margin. Overall, fine condition.

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