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GENERAL DOUGLAS MACARTHUR - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 09/21/1927 - HFSID 1890

GENERAL DOUGLAS MacARTHUR The most decorated US soldier in WWI signs his name on this letter from 1927, regarding his invitation to address the Artillerists Association of Reading Typed Letter Signed: "Douglas MacArthur", 1p, 7½x9½. Baltimore, Maryland, 1927 September 21. To Captain Joseph D.

Sale Price $2,000.00

Reg. $2,500.00

Condition: slightly soiled, otherwise fine condition
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GENERAL DOUGLAS MacARTHUR
The most decorated US soldier in WWI signs his name on this letter from 1927, regarding his invitation to address the Artillerists Association of Reading
Typed Letter Signed: "Douglas MacArthur", 1p, 7½x9½. Baltimore, Maryland, 1927 September 21. To Captain Joseph D. Eisenbrown, The Armory, Reading, Pennsylvania. In full: "I have your flattering letter of September 19th asking me to select my own date as an occasion for addressing the Artillerists Association of Reading. I have just been notified of my election as the chairman of the Olympic Committee and am thereby charged with the organization and handling of that great effort. The additional demands thereby made upon my time during the next two or three months which may involve a trip to Europe, make it impossible for me to commit myself to you notwithstanding my inclination to do so. As I realize you must have some definite information, I feel that in justice to the situation I must decline. If, later on, I find myself at leisure, I will write you to that effect and I am sure we can arrange some appropriate occasion for me to meet personally the members of the Association." The sudden death of William C. Prout, President of the American Olympic Committee, earlier in 1927 caused consternation within the Olympic organizations, nearly disrupting U.S. chances for a medallion showing. Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964), America's most decorated soldier in WWI and Superintendent of West Point after the war, came to the attention of the Committee because he brought prestige to the military academy through athletic training programs as well as reform of the curriculum. As an advocate of athletics with military strictness as an added bonus, MacArthur was chosen to head the Committee (1927-1928), taking leave from serving under U.S. Army Chief of Staff General Charles Summerall. MacArthur, who mentions a possible trip to Europe in this letter, ventured the 3,000 miles to Amsterdam with the athletes, who included Johnny Weissmuller, later the star of Tarzan films (Weissmuller would win a gold medal in the 100-meter Freestyle men's swimming event). The U.S. placed well, winning eight gold medals in the men's track and field events, five golds in men's swimming, five golds in women's swimming and a gold medal (won by Elizabeth Robinson) in the newly introduced women's track and field. After his return to military life after the games, MacArthur was named the Army's Chief of Staff (1930-1935) by President Herbert Hoover. At the conclusion of Staff service, MacArthur took a military assignment in the newly independent Philippines. He would retire two years later (1937) to help build the nation's national defense. With the onslaught of WWII (1939-1945), Roosevelt reinstated MacArthur just five months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (December 7, 1941). Given duty in the Pacific Theater, MacArthur became Allied Supreme Commander in the South West Pacific (1942, for which he received the Congressional Medal of Honor in April 1942) and of Occupational Forces in Japan (1945-1951). He became a Five-Star General of the Army in 1944 and accepted the surrender of Japan aboard the battleship "Missouri" on September 2, 1945. MacArthur was later dismissed as Supreme Commander of United Nations forces in Korea by President Truman in April 1951 because of his public statements advocating invasion of China. Upon his return to the U.S. to a hero's welcome, MacArthur continued his outspoken criticism of Truman, and was determined to defeat Truman's Democratic Party in the 1952 presidential campaign. In the summer of 1952, MacArthur had given the keynote address at the Republican National Convention, and he actively supported Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential campaign. After his election, Eisenhower sought MacArthur's advice on the conflict in Korea, but he rejected MacArthur's view that military operations should be expanded, resulting in MacArthur playing no further role in the Eisenhower administration. Lightly creased. Slightly soiled at blank margins. Fine condition. Framed in the Gallery of History style: 31x21½.

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