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HELEN KELLER - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 09/17/1930 - HFSID 15581

In the year her second autobiography was published, Keller writes to "Effendi", Frank Nelson Doubleday, the publisher of both of her autobiographies, painting a vivid picture of her vacation home in England.

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HELEN KELLER
In the year her second autobiography was published, Keller writes to "Effendi", Frank Nelson Doubleday, the publisher of both of her autobiographies, painting a vivid picture of her vacation home in England.
TLS: "Helen Keller" in pencil, 2¼p, 7¼x10¼. Trout Hall, Wendens Ambo, Essex, 1930 September 17. To "Dear Effendi" (Frank Nelson Doubleday), New York. In full: "At last I am sending you the pictures I spoke of in my letter from Cornwall. Before we left for Ireland, the middle of June, we asked the photographer to make up several sets and have them at Trout Hall when we arrived July 1st. There were no photographs awaiting us, and it has taken several letters to bring them forth. We discovered that it Cornwall people take life casually. Indeed, according to their philosophy, to be in a hurry is to be stark mad. Many thanks for your kind letter, which was very welcome. I am glad my letter pleased you. I was sorry I did not know you were in London. I should have liked to call on you, and I think you might have enjoyed seeing this quiet, pleasant old country-house smiling over the wall at the sweet little hamlet of Wendens Ambo. The country about here is very beautiful, and the walks and drive are brimful of delight. I especially like the walks, they are so intimate, and bring so much within my reach. I love the earth through the small bits of it I can touch - and it seems to me, my love of things I can feel has all the romance and joy that are usually associated with things seen only. Essex is right in foot-paths. As we walk along the by-ways, we startle from their hiding-places hares and rabbits, snipe, partridges and many pheasants. We cannot look where there are not blossoms or berries, bright red, purple or silver! There is an amazing variety of foot-paths, sometimes they are broad and unmistakable, like the green 'rides' of Epping Forest, sometimes they are narrow, and so faint one must look closely at the grass to detect the marks left by the wayfarer's feet. Sometimes they go through the meadows of a pretty river, where one encounters a herdsman with his cattle, or perhaps they climb up a stony slope where one zigzags between nibbling sheep, whose wool is so thick, it feels like bales of cotton as they crowd past. But what especially impresses me is the kindly feeling these paths convey to me that some on is expecting me because the way is prepared for me. When crossing a field, I wonder how I shall climb over the hedge, and lo! there is a hidden stile and a wooden step ready for my foot. 'Always get over a stile,' said Richard Jeffries. Truly, these stiles are an expression of the well ordered life of England, and they are a neighborly hand stretched out to one across the fields. It will cost us a wrench of the heart to leave this spot where we have been so quietly, deeply happy and at peace. We sail from Southampton September 25th on the President Roosevelt. As soon as we reach New York, Polly and I must go straight to Detroit, where I am to speak before the Junior League at the opening of their training cottage for blind children. Then I suppose I shall be busy as usual with appeals for the Foundation for the Blind. I hope I may have a chance to see you when we are settled down in Forest Hills again. Always my thoughts go out to you lovingly and gratefully. Please give my love to Mrs. Doubleday. Mrs. Macy and Polly send kindest greetings to you both with mine. Affectionately your friend". With original typed envelope, not stamped. EFFENDI was the nickname of FRANK NELSON DOUBLEDAY, the Chairman of the Board of the publishing company Doubleday, Doran & Company. The nickname, a Turkish word meaning "master" or "chief" (and sounding similar to his initials, FND) was given to him by his friend, author Rudyard Kipling. Doubleday had published Keller's autobiographies, The Story of My Life (1903) and Midstream: My Later Life (1930, the year of this letter). Keller often corresponded with him and his wife. Mrs. Macy was ANNE SULLIVAN MACY, the woman called "Teacher". After Sullivan married John Macy, who had helped edit Keller's first book, the couple's Forest Hills residence became the "home base" of Keller and MARY AGNES "POLLY" THOMSON, who was Keller's secretary (from 1914) and nurse/companion (1922 until her death in 1960). Keller, Thomson and Macy often vacationed in England, France and Scotland, Thomson's homeland. Inspirational lecturer and author HELEN KELLER (1880-1968) had entered her dark, silent world as a result of illness while still a toddler. When she was about six years old, her parents sought help from Alexander Graham Bell, who had demonstrated his father's Visible Speech system at the Boston School for Deaf Mutes in 1871. Bell was instrumental in having instructor Anne Mansfield Sullivan (1866-1936) sent to teach Helen how to read, write and speak. With Sullivan's help, Helen learned the manual alphabet and graduated cum laude from Radcliffe in 1904. Devoting the rest of her life to the blind and deaf, Keller lectured and campaigned for improved services for the handicapped. In 1932, she and Sullivan helped make English Braille the standard. Keller, who wrote several books, was awarded membership in the National Institute of Arts and Letters. In 1934, her film biography, The Unconquered, premiered, and Keller's life was later the basis for William Gibson's Tony Award-winning Broadway play (1959-1961) and the Academy Award-winning feature film (1962), The Miracle Worker. Lightly creased with folds, not at signature. ¼-inch tears at lower right blank margins of both pages. ¼-inch tear at lower blank edge and minor pinhead-size stain at upper blank margin of signature page. Fine condition.

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