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HENRY CLAY - THIRD PERSON AUTOGRAPH LETTER 08/31/1825 - HFSID 251351

HENRY CLAY Henry Clay wrote this third person autograph letter in 1825, while he was Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams, to turn down an invitation to dinner with a general. Third person autograph letter signed "Mr. Clay" as J.Q. Adams' Secretary of State.

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Reg. $600.00

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HENRY CLAY
Henry Clay wrote this third person autograph letter in 1825, while he was Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams, to turn down an invitation to dinner with a general.
Third person autograph letter signed "Mr. Clay" as J.Q. Adams' Secretary of State. 1 page, 7¾x3¾. Aug. 31, 1825.In full: "Mr. Clay's respectful compliments to Genl Macomb, and he regrets that a late afflicting event in his family will not permit him to accept the General's polite invitation to dinner on Saturday next." Kentuckian Clay (1777-1852, born in Hanover County, Virginia), who became known as "the Great Pacificator", took office as Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams during less than peaceful circumstances. One of four Presidential hopefuls in the 1824 election, Clay had fewer electoral votes than Adams, Andrew Jackson or William Crawford and was forced to withdraw. Clay's 37 electoral votes determined the outcome of the election when, on the evening of January 9, 1825, he visited Adams, and they struck a bargain. Adams won the election and the animosity of both Jackson and Crawford, who cried "corrupt bargain". Their charge gained credibility when Clay headed the list of Adams' Cabinet appointments. Clay also served as U.S. Senator (1806-1807, 1810-1811, 1831-1842, 1849-1852), Congressman (1811-1814, 1815-1821, 1823-1825) and Speaker of the House (all years in Congress except 1821). He set his bids on the presidency in two additional elections: as the National Republican (Whig) nominee in 1832 (losing to Jackson) and the Whig nominee in 1844 (defeated by Polk). When Clay died on June 29, 1852, he was sure that his last great work, the Compromise of 1850, had permanently averted a Civil War. Unfortunately, the compromise only delayed the inevitable for a decade. During the War of 1812, General Alexander Macomb defended Plattsburg against the British. He was Commanding General of the U. S. Army from 1828 until his death in 1841. Irregular left edge with bottom corner missing. Stain beneath text touches the "3" in date. Light circular stain touches four words. Light folds. Overall, fine condition.

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