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HORATIO KING - MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED 10/16/1857 - HFSID 17269

HORATIO KING As Assistant Postmaster General (1857), he signs a manuscript letter to Congressman Samuel S. Cox ("the letter carrier's friend), informing him that a position has already been filled. Manuscript Letter signed: "Horatio King" as Assistant Postmaster General, 7½x10.

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HORATIO KING
As Assistant Postmaster General (1857), he signs a manuscript letter to Congressman Samuel S. Cox ("the letter carrier's friend), informing him that a position has already been filled.
Manuscript Letter signed: "Horatio King" as Assistant Postmaster General, 7½x10. Post Office Department, 1857 October 16. To S. S. Cox, Columbus Ohio. Replying to a request that a Mr. Huff be considered for transfer to a new position in the post office, King states that the appointment has already been filled. Docketed on verso. HORATIO KING (1811-1897), previously a newspaper editor, was employed by the US Post Office as a clerk in Washington in 1839, and rose through the Department to become first Assistant Postmaster General (1854, under Campbell), and then Postmaster General in the final month of the Buchanan Presidency (February-March 1861). Responding to an inquiry about the franking privilege from a South Carolina Congressman, King was the first federal official to formally deny that states had a right to secede from the Union. King remained in Washington during the Civil War, helping to supervise emancipation in that city, and was active afterwards in the Monument Society, hastening completion of the Washington Monument. He wrote frequent letters to the newspapers. While a lawyer in private practice, he successfully lobbied Congress to introduce the Penalty Envelope, an envelope for official business warning of a stiff "penalty for private use." The letter was certainly addressed to Samuel Sullivan Cox (1824-1889), a lawyer and newspaper editor in Columbus, Ohio, who served in the US Congress representing two states: Ohio (1857-1865) and New York (1865-1885, 1886-1889), and served as US Minister to the Ottoman Empire (1885-1886). Cox was responsible for legislation raising the salaries and increasing benefits for postal employees, earning the sobriquet "the letter carrier's friend." After his death, grateful postal workers funded erection of a statue honoring Cox in New York City. Irregularly cut edges. Multiple moisture and ink burn marks throughout letter. Notch at lower right edge. Five horizontal mailing folds.

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