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ISAAC M. SINGER - MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED 07/08/1873 - HFSID 285886

Rare manuscript letter written from his estate in England to Inslee Hopper, his successor as head of the Singer Manufacturing Co. in New York. Hopper has added his receipt acknowledgement in purple ink!

Sale Price $3,825.00

Reg. $4,500.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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ISAAC M. SINGER
Rare manuscript letter written from his estate in England to Inslee Hopper, his successor as head of the Singer Manufacturing Co. in New York. Hopper has added his receipt acknowledgement in purple ink!
Manuscript Letter signed: "I M Singer", 1p, 5x8. Paignion, South Devon, England, 1873 July 8. To The Director of the Singer Manufacturing Co., New York. In full: "On receipt of this letter, please send me sight Bill of Exchange for Five thousand pounds (£5000) but should Gold and Exchange exceed 125 you may wait until you are able to buy at that price. I have telegraphed to Mr. Hawley to come out, and write to you as I expect he will sail before this letter arrives." Ink note receipt acknowledgement by Singer President Inslee Hopper: "July 23 73". Singer received his first patent for a commercial sewing machine in 1851. Three years later, he introduced a domestic model that made him one of the wealthiest Americans of the century. In late 1857, Singer opened the world's first mass production facility for something other than firearms in New York. I.M. Singer & Company was soon able to cut production costs to a little more than $10.00 per machine. Singer sold his new machines for 50% less than his first, yet had increased his profit margin to 530% per machine. In 1867, the company became a worldwide success. Singer used his money to attract women, and by 1873, he had 20 children by five women. Singer was legally married to three women; he married two others under assumed names. Disenchanted with attempting to live down his reputation, in 1873, the year of this letter, he left America and moved to England, where he bought a nobleman's estate in Paignton, Devonshire and began the construction of an enormous castle, which he called the Wigwam. It included a theatre, riding hall, banquet hall and all the conveniences money could buy, but it was still not finished when he died in 1875. All 20 children shared in his estate, although his fifth wife Isobel (third legal) inherited the bulk of the estate and carried on the business. When Singer stepped down as President of Singer Manufacturing, he insisted that his business manager, Edward S. Clark, not succeed him. (The straight-laced Clark had alienated Singer by criticizing his life style.) Inslee Hopper, formerly an office, clerk, was a compromise choice to lead the company. After Singer died, Hopper stepped aside in favor of Clark. Hopper was fond of marking correspondence with his purple pen. Lightly creased. Ink notes (unknown hand) at upper margin, which is shaded. Tape remnant at upper left edge. Overall, fine condition.

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