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J. EDGAR HOOVER - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 03/28/1950 - HFSID 253414

J. EDGAR HOOVER About bank robber Willie Sutton. Typed Letter Signed: "J. Edgar Hoover" as Director of the FBI, 1p, 8x10½. Washington, D.C., 1950 March 28. To Carl M. Holmgren, Concord, New Hampshire.

Sale Price $405.00

Reg. $450.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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J. EDGAR HOOVER
About bank robber Willie Sutton.
Typed Letter Signed: "J. Edgar Hoover" as Director of the FBI, 1p, 8x10½. Washington, D.C., 1950 March 28. To Carl M. Holmgren, Concord, New Hampshire. In full: "This will acknowledge your letter of March 18, 1950, relative to William Francis Sutton, who is wanted by this Bureau. Information in our possession fails to indicate whether or not William Francis Sutton may be related to Dr. Howard Sutton of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Special Agent in Charge of our Boston, Massachusetts, Division will have a Special Agent call upon you in order that this matter may be gone into thoroughly." J. EDGAR HOOVER (1895-1972, born John Edgar Hoover in Washington, DC) served as the first Director of the FBI from 1924 until his death in 1972. During his 48-year term, he restored order to the department and established the world's largest fingerprint file and the FBI Academy. The FBI fought organized crime in the Prohibition era. Under his direction, the FBI also infiltrated the American Communist Party, the Ku Klux Klan and other subversive organizations. It also conducted counterintelligence during WWII and the Cold War. By the 1970s, Hoover came under frequent public criticism for his authoritarian administration, but his power was so great that no President dared to remove him. Hoover made the FBI one of the world's most effective law enforcement agencies. He established its vast fingerprint file, crime laboratory and training academy. Bank robber WILLIAM FRANCIS SUTTON is remembered for his answer to the question, "Why do you rob banks?" He replied: "That's where the money is!" Sutton robbed about 100 banks over a career spanning from the 1920s to his final arrest in 1952, two years after Hoover wrote this letter. He "withdrew" roughly $2 million and escaped from three prisons, including Sing Sing. Lightly creased. Fine condition.

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