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JACK GEORGE - ANNOTATED DOCUMENT SIGNED 01/27 - HFSID 282920

JACK GEORGE With a TV appearance pending, the veteran actor/musician invokes the Taft-Hartley Act instead of joining the TV actors' union (1952) Document signed: "Jack George". 1 page, 6x10½ with 6x4 note (unknown hand) stapled to face at upper left corner. Hollywood, California, (1952) January 27.

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JACK GEORGE
With a TV appearance pending, the veteran actor/musician invokes the Taft-Hartley Act instead of joining the TV actors' union (1952)
Document signed: "Jack George". 1 page, 6x10½ with 6x4 note (unknown hand) stapled to face at upper left corner. Hollywood, California, (1952) January 27. Statement for the Television Authority of the American Federation of Labor, Los Angeles Office. Listing a pending appearance on "Jack Benny", George adds an autograph note, in full: "Dear Sirs - I told your 'checker' that I would availe [sic] myself of the Taft-Hartley Act - which was mutually agreeable." George also states on the section of the form for reporting income, "I did not work in 1951." George checks that he was already a member of 3 other unions, Actors Equity (stage), Screen Actors Guild (film), and American Federation of Radio Actors (not yet merged with the TV actors union). Musician/actor Jack George (1888-1958) began appearing in films in 1936, at first exclusively in musical roles (violin player, orchestra leader, etc.), mostly un-credited. Later he began to appear in small, non-musical parts as well. In 1952, for example, the year he signed this statement, George appeared not only on Jack Benny's show, but also as an orchestra leader in the film musical Singin' in the Rain and on several TV series, including The Cisco Kid, Gang Busters and Racket Squad. His statement that he "did not work in 1951" must have applied to television work, since he appeared in several films, including The Great Caruso, Leave It to the Marines and Quo Vadis. The Taft-Harley Act of 1947, passed over the veto of President Truman (who nevertheless invoked it 12 times against strikers during the Korean War) restricted the legal rights of labor unions and increased the rights of employers. For actors, the so-called "Taft-Hartley exception" - a rather limited one - means that an actor may perform for no more than 30 days in a single TV acting role without joining the governing union - AFTRA. The show's producer must also attest that he needs this particular non-union actor for the role. Top edge is toned, creased and has 2 small vertical tears. Lower edge is creased and has 3 vertical tears. 2 horizontal fold creases. Note is creased at edges and lightly nicked at top edge. Both pieces are lightly shaded. Otherwise, fine condition.

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