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JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE - AUTOGRAPH QUOTATION SIGNED 05/16/1875 - HFSID 224743

JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE The Massachusetts minister and nineteenth-century social activist pens phrase from his days at Harvard College, signs name in black ink Autograph quotation signed: ""Alteri Seculo"/ James Freeman Clarke/ Jamaica Plain/ Massachusetts/ May 16th 1875" in black ink. 3½x2¼ clipping.

Sale Price $198.00

Reg. $220.00

Condition: fine condition
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JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE
The Massachusetts minister and nineteenth-century social activist pens phrase from his days at Harvard College, signs name in black ink
Autograph quotation signed: ""Alteri Seculo"/ James Freeman Clarke/ Jamaica Plain/ Massachusetts/ May 16th 1875" in black ink. 3½x2¼ clipping. Jamaica Plain, Boston, Massachusetts. May 16, 1875. "Alteri Seculo" is the Adams House motto at Harvard University, from Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, "Serit arbores quae alteri seculo prosint" meaning "He who plants trees labors for the benefit of future generations". James Clarke Freeman (1810-1888) was an American theologian, author, and social activist. After attending Boston Latin School and graduating from Harvard College and Harvard Divinity School, Freeman was ordained into the Unitarian church, and was first assigned to a church in Louisville Kentucky, a slave state, and actively began working for the national movement for the abolition of slavery, even upsetting his conservative church members to the point of walking out. He returned to Boston and established the Church of the Disciples, which fought to apply the Christian religion to the social problems of the day, including slavery and women's rights. He contributed essays to publications such as The Christian Examiner, The Christian Inquirer, The Christian Register, The Dial, Harper's, The Index, and Atlantic Monthly. He began editing his own magazine, the Western Messenger, many copies which are now valued for having the earliest printed poems of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and works of female literary critic Margaret Fuller. In 1855 Clarke purchased the former site of Brook Farm, intending to start a new Utopian community there, but it never came to pass, and instead the land was offered to President Lincoln during the American Civil War. His publications include Common Sense in Religion (1874), Every-Day Religion (1886), Sermons on the Lord's Prayer (1888) and Ten Great Religions (1871-83), which made Clarke one of the very first Americans to explore and write about Eastern religions. Toned. Corners rounded. Slight stains throughout. Ink notes on verso in unknown hand. Adhesive residue on verso. Otherwise, fine condition.

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