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JAMES G. THURBER - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 05/08/1961 - HFSID 48623

JAMES THURBER James Thurber sends a typed letter of thanks for the copy of the clipping. Typed Letter Signed: "Thurber" in pencil, 1p, 8¼x10¾. The Stafford Hotel, St. James's Place, London, 1961 May 8. To Mr. Tom Mahoney, The Reader's Digest, Press Information Service, New York, New York.

Sale Price $450.00

Reg. $500.00

Condition: fine condition
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JAMES THURBER
James Thurber sends a typed letter of thanks for the copy of the clipping.
Typed Letter Signed: "Thurber" in pencil, 1p, 8¼x10¾. The Stafford Hotel, St. James's Place, London, 1961 May 8. To Mr. Tom Mahoney, The Reader's Digest, Press Information Service, New York, New York. In full: "Thanks very much for sending me that clipping, which we had not seen over here. Best wishes, Sincerely yours," Fragile. Lightly toned. Paper clip rust at upper left. Fold crease not near signature. With original envelope with English stamp, postmarked in London. Fine condition. In 1955, American writer and cartoonist James Thurber (1894-1961) published Thurber's Dogs, a compilation of 30 canine stories and illustrations he had created over the course of his career. Included in Thurber's Dogs is his first published short story, a tale about a bull terrier entitled, "Josephine Has Her Day" (1923). Thurber's writings as well as his illustrations stand alone in their originality. His cartoon drawings accentuate Thurber's endearingly innocent and eccentric characterizations within his wonderfully humorous stories. The domineering Thurber Woman versus the oppressed, cowering male, complete with his famous depictions of dogs, is a rampant theme of his work. From a childhood replete with family dogs, "man's best friend" played an integral role in Thurber's life and especially his art. At the author's request, his obituary in "The New Yorker", of which he was once managing editor and writer (1927-1933), included a drawing of a Thurber dog. Thurber's first published drawing had appeared in 1931 in "The New Yorker". After Thurber left the magazine, he remained a contributor while working on such humorous urban classics as "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" from My World and Welcome To It (1942), The Thurber Carnival (1945), the autobiographical The Thurber Album (1952 by which time he was nearly blind), The Years With Ross (1959), a biography of his former "The New Yorker" boss, and Credos and Curios (1962, posthumously). Several of his works were produced in film and on Broadway including a 1960 stage version of The Thurber Carnival (with Thurber playing himself). Two items.

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