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JAMES H. MEREDITH - AUTOGRAPH CIRCA 1967 - HFSID 253453

Signature from the First Black student to attend the University of Mississippi. Notes from an unidentified signer are written on the verso: "Whites must learn not to stereotype the negro!" Signature: "J H Meredith", 4¾x3½.

Sale Price $85.00

Reg. $100.00

Condition: Lightly creased Add to watchlist:
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JAMES H. MEREDITH
Signature from the First Black student to attend the University of Mississippi. Notes from an unidentified signer are written on the verso: "Whites must learn not to stereotype the negro!"
Signature: "J H Meredith", 4¾x3½. On verso are ink notes in an unknown hand taken at Luther College on April 10, 1967, during Meredith's address that day to Luther students (spelling uncorrected): "No different when LBJ & RFK disagree than when King & Charmichael disagree. Whites must learn not to stereotype the negro! We must become a single society in order to win the war in Viet Nam. Negros must participate more and more wisely in our Capitalistic Society. The Jews & Irish, etc. didn't have too much trouble getting respect & equality and Merideth (sic) think that the Negro can too, even though his skin is a different color then the Jews, Irish, etc." Founded in 1861, Luther College is an undergraduate liberal arts college in Decorah, Iowa. After serving nine years in the U.S. Air Force, James Meredith registered at the University of Mississippi in the Fall of 1961. Attempts were made to block his registration, but the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that admission could not be denied to any academically qualified, tax-paying state citizen. In the wake of increasingly violent protests, President John F. Kennedy ordered U.S. Marshals to escort Meredith to class. Riots broke out and two students were killed before the National Guard arrived. Meredith's entrance to "Ole Miss" was a pivotal point in the Civil Rights movement, and he followed it with his 1966 "Walk Against Fear", a march from Memphis to Jackson, Mississippi to urge Blacks to exercise their voting rights. Meredith was shot on the march, and when he was physically able to resume the march, he did so, joined this time by the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and other prominent Civil Rights leaders. Torn edges. Light stains touch the "M". Lightly creased, touching the "M" and "r" of Meredith. Otherwise, fine condition.

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