loading..

JAMES RYDER RANDALL - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 11/24/1887 - HFSID 177259

JAMES RYDER RANDALL Randall handwrote, signed and dated this letter as editor of The Anniston Hot Blast in 1887. He wrote it to S. O. Granger, Esq. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, regarding a book. Autograph letter signed "James R Randall". With black ink notations and pencil marks near bottom edge in unknown hand.

Sale Price $374.00

Reg. $440.00

Condition: fine condition
PSA / JSA Authentication Guarantee
Free U.S. Shipping
Chat now or call 800-425-5379

JAMES RYDER RANDALL
Randall handwrote, signed and dated this letter as editor of The Anniston Hot Blast in 1887. He wrote it to S. O. Granger, Esq. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, regarding a book.
Autograph letter signed "James R Randall". With black ink notations and pencil marks near bottom edge in unknown hand. 1 page, 8x10 ¼, on Randall's ruled letterhead as editor of the Anniston Hot Blast. Anniston, Alabama, Nov. 24, 1887. Addressed to S. O. Granger, Esq., Philaelphia, Pennsyvania. In full: "Dear Sir: I think the single volume, which I presume is a digest or compendium, will answer every purpose. It was a single volume I referred to. Indeed, I did not know of any other series. Vy. Sincerely Yrs.". Randall (1839-1908, born in Baltimore, Maryland) is a poet and journalist best known for writing the poem Maryland, My Maryland. Randall wrote it on April 21, 1861, after hearing that one of his friends had been killed in Maryland in the opening weeks of the American Civil War. He was chair of the English department at Poydras College in Pointe-Coupée, Louisiana, so the poem was first published in New Orleans five days after Randall wrote it. It made its way back to Maryland and eventually became the state song of Maryland. Randall joined the editorial staffs of several newspapers after the Civil War, with his final job as an editor and correspondent with the Augusta Chronicle. The Anniston Hot Blast was first published in Anniston, Alabama by in Aug. 18, 1883 as a four-page weekly newspaper, with an annual subscription going for $2. According to GetCalhoun.com, the Web site of Calhoun County, Alabama, "Hot Blast" possibly refers to Anniston's chief industry at the time - the manufacture of iron and steel - and made it stand out from the more than 30 local newspapers in the Anniston area with more staid names like The Evening Star, The Republic Weekly and The Labor Review Weekly. It became a weekly in 1887. The Hot Blast's first editor was Dr. Thomas W. Ayers; we're unsure when Randall became editor, although the date of this letter does coincide with the paper's transformation from a weekly to a daily paper. The paper merged with The Evening Star in 1912 and continues to this day as The Anniston Star. Lightly toned, soiled and creased. Staple holes near top left corner. Light dent on left edge. Light tears on right edge. Two pinholes near bottom edge. Folded twice vertically and four times horizontally. Light tears along folds on right edge. Otherwise in fine condition.

This website image may contain our company watermark. The actual item does not contain this watermark

See more listings from these signers
Make an offer today and get a quick response
Check your account for the status.

Following offer submission users will be contacted at their account email address within 48 hours. Our response will be to accept your offer, decline your offer or send you a final counteroffer. All offers can be viewed from within the "Document Offers" area of your HistoryForSale account. Please review the Make Offer Terms prior to making an offer.

If you have not received an offer acceptance or counter-offer email within 24-hours please check your spam/junk email folder.

 

World-Wide Shipping

Fast FedEx and USPS shipping

Authenticity Guaranteed

COA with every purchase

Questions Answered 24/7

Contact us day or night

Submit Offers

Get a quick response