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LUCIUS MORRIS BEEBE - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 06/23/1938 - HFSID 31808

LUCIUS MORRIS BEEBE Author and cultural critic Lucius Morris Beebe signed this letter, typed on New York Herald-Tribune stationery in 1938, to columnist Louis Sobol about the origins of the ward eight mixed drink. Typed letter signed "Lucius" in pencil. Pencil checkmark in unknown hand.

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Reg. $300.00

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LUCIUS MORRIS BEEBE
Author and cultural critic Lucius Morris Beebe signed this letter, typed on New York Herald-Tribune stationery in 1938, to columnist Louis Sobol about the origins of the ward eight mixed drink.
Typed letter signed "Lucius" in pencil. Pencil checkmark in unknown hand. 1 page, 8¼x11, on stationery of the New York Herald-Tribune. Editorial Rooms, June 23, 1958. Addressed to Louis Sobol, Esq. In full: "Dear Louis, I didn't catch the antecedent discussion but merely your line about the Ward Eight being invented in Boston. Even more spec-ifically it probably came into being, although these legends are always shrouded in some apocryphal doubt, in Locke Ober's Winter Place Wine Rooms, the most distinguished restaurant, bar none, in North America. Located on a mews between Temple Place and Winter Street Locke's and Obers were two separate establishments which joined together by the simple expedient of tearing down the party wall in the middle eighties. Theodore Roosevelt, Caruso, Eben Jordan were among the patrons who thought it was the finest place in the world. The Ward Eight, a sort of tall rye sour with an infusion of grenadine and served in a Tom Collins or milk punch glass, came into being in the nineties . It was a great favorite with the Beacon Hill politicians who found Locke's the nearest bar to the Statehouse and frequented it in great numbers. It is a Boston favorite to this day. Regards, Lucius Beebe". " New York journalist LOUIS SOBOL (1896-1986), wrote a gossip-oriented entertainment column for 40 years, initially focused on the Broadway stage but also covering film and TV personalities for the New York Journal American. His books include The Longest Street, a Broadway memoir and Along the Broadway Beat. LUCIUS MORRIS BEEBE (1902-1966) was a newspaper columnist, author, editor and publisher, not to mention a gourmand and a bon vivant who cracked life's bones and sucked out the sweet marrow. Beebe had an aristocratic upbringing but was a wild child; he got thrown out of both Harvard and Yale, not a bad feat. He became a journalist after college, working briefly as a with the Boston Telegraph and later with the New York Herald-Tribune (1929-1950). He also contributed to magazines like Gourmet, The New Yorker, Town and Country, Holiday, American Heritage and Playboy. A cultural critic, Beebe was a sophisticated gentleman who transported his readers into a world of elegance and extravagance and who never used a ten-cent word if he could use a five-dollar one. From 1952 to 1960, he and longtime companion Charles Clegg were owners of the Virginia City News in Virginia City, Nevada, which they renamed the Territorial Enterprise and Virginia City News and built into one of the premiere weeklies in the U. S. They moved to San Francisco in 1960, when Virginia City started to get too touristy. Beebe wrote a column there at the San Francisco Chronicle until the year of his death. Beebe was also a noted gourmand, with a regular column in Gourmet, and was fascinated with railroad travel; he owned two opulently furnished private railroad cars, the Gold Coast and the Virginia City, which still exist today. Lightly toned and creased. Paper clip impressions and rust stains in top left corner. Folded twice and unfolded. Otherwise in fine condition.

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