Skip to Main Content Skip to Header Menu Skip to Main Menu Skip to Category Menu Skip to Footer

MAJOR GENERAL DANIEL E. SICKLES - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED - HFSID 253688

MAJOR GENERAL DANIEL E. SICKLES Invitation, handwritten and dated by the Civil War Major General, to attend a fundraiser for disabled and sick soldiers Autograph letter signed "DSickles". 2 pages (1 sheet front and verso), 5x8, inlaid to 5¼x8¼. To Mr. S. B. Chittenden. In full: "Dear Mr.

Sale Price $595.00

Reg. $700.00

Condition: See item description
Free U.S. Shipping
Chat now or call 800-425-5379

MAJOR GENERAL DANIEL E. SICKLES
Invitation, handwritten and dated by the Civil War Major General, to attend a fundraiser for disabled and sick soldiers
Autograph letter signed "DSickles". 2 pages (1 sheet front and verso), 5x8, inlaid to 5¼x8¼. To Mr. S. B. Chittenden. In full: "Dear Mr. Chittenden: I beg to com-mend to your patronage an Entertainment gotten up under the auspices of the 'Grand Army of the Republic' in aid of its Charity fund for the relief of disabled and sick soldiers and their destitute families - Will you not help us by taking a few tickets & honor the occasion with your presence?" "S. B. Chittenden" is probably Simeon B. Chittenden, a businessman who was vice-president of the New York City Chamber of Commerce from 1867 to 189 and served as a United States Representative for New York from 1874 to 1881. Chittenden also made an unsuccessful Congressional run in 1866. Daniel E. Sickles(1825-1914), born in New York City, had gained notoriety before the Civil War when he shot Philip Barton Key, the son of Francis Scott Key, because he believed Key and his wife were lovers. (Sickles was tried for murder but acquitted, the first successful "temporary insanity" defense in U.S. history.) During the American Civil War, he rose from colonel to major general in command of a brigade at Gettysburg, Sickles, thinking that his position was vulnerable, moved his 3rd Corps from Cemetery Ridge to the battlefield's Peach Orchard without orders. His action drew criticism, but he was later credited with staving off disaster by blocking a surprise attack led by General James Longstreet against the Union Army's left flank at Little Round Top. Sickles lost a leg in the fighting, but won the respect of General Winfield Scott Hancock, in command at Little Round Top. Sickles' brigade, however, had the fifth most killed and wounded of all brigades in the war. He represented New York in the U.S. Congress (1857-1861, 1893-1895) and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1897. Lightly toned and creased. Page has been folded in eights and unfolded. One fold just touches the last "s" in Sickles. Otherwise, fine condition.

This website image may contain our company watermark. The actual item does not contain this watermark
See more listings from these signers
Make an offer today and get a quick response
Check your account for the status.

Following offer submission users will be contacted at their account email address within 48 hours. Our response will be to accept your offer, decline your offer or send you a final counteroffer. All offers can be viewed from within the "Document Offers" area of your HistoryForSale account. Please review the Make Offer Terms prior to making an offer.

If you have not received an offer acceptance or counter-offer email within 24-hours please check your spam/junk email folder.

 

World-Wide Shipping

Fast FedEx and USPS shipping

Authenticity Guarantee

COA with every purchase

All Questions Answered

Contact us day or night

Submit Offers

Get a quick response