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MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE W. CULLUM - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED CIRCA 1891 - HFSID 86978

GEORGE WASHINGTON CULLUM. ALS: "Geo. W. Cullum", 1p, 4½x6¾. New York, no year, May 1 [1891]. On his personal 261 Fifth Avenue stationery, with postmarked envelope addressed by Cullum to General James Grant Wilson of New York City.

Sale Price $450.00

Reg. $500.00

Condition: lightly soiled, otherwise fine condition
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GEORGE WASHINGTON CULLUM.
ALS: "Geo. W. Cullum", 1p, 4½x6¾. New York, no year, May 1 [1891]. On his personal 261 Fifth Avenue stationery, with postmarked envelope addressed by Cullum to General James Grant Wilson of New York City. In full: "Dear General, As I will be in Washington on the eighth of this month, I sincerely regret that I cannot avail myself of your courteous invitation to listen to the eloquent Dr. Dix upon the noble character and multitudinous good works of my dear departed friend John J. Astor". Written within one year before his death. CULLUM (1809-1892), the former career military officer from New York, was alive at the same time as wealthy New York businessman and philanthropist JOHN JACOB ASTOR (1763-1848). Cullum was a West Point graduate who during the Civil War, served as Chief of Staff with the rank of Brigadier General of Volunteers to General Henry W. Halleck. After leaving Halleck in 1864, Cullum was Superintendent of West Point for two years. Then he performed various engineering duties until his retirement in 1874 with the rank of Colonel. In 1875, he married General Halleck's widow and went on to author a major compendium on the graduates of the U.S. Military Academy. JAMES GRANT WILSON (1832-1914) also from New York, was a writer and lecturer who served in numerous capacities in the Civil War. Of note he was Acting Colonel in the 15th Illinois Cavalry participating in the Vicksburg campaign. He later accompanied U.S. Grant in 1863 to New Orleans where he served as Aide-de-Camp in the Department of the Gulf. After the war he lived in New York and resumed his literary and lecturing career. He had lectured at West Point. He also served on many philanthropic committees, including being a delegate from St. James Church to many New York Diocesan conventions. MORGAN DIX (1827-1908) was the eldest son of JAMES ADAMS DIX, Buchanan's Secretary of the Treasury, who served in New York as a Major General during the Civil War. Morgan Dix was a Protestant Episcopal clergyman who was Rector at Trinity Church in NYC at the time of this letter. Great association of prominent Civil War and historical figures. The envelope shows one dime-size stain affecting three words. The letter is lightly soiled affecting two words and the "W" in signature. Fine condition. Two items.
 

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