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MAJOR GENERAL PHILIP JOHN SCHUYLER - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 10/28/1797 - HFSID 286407

Because he had "urgent occasion for a sum of money at present," Schuyler sent this peremptory ALS to his nephew, John J. Van Rensselaer, demanding immediate repayment of a large loan. "The bearer shall wait your answer."

Sale Price $850.00

Reg. $1,000.00

Condition: fine condition
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PHILIP SCHUYLER
Because he had "urgent occasion for a sum of money at present," Schuyler sent this peremptory ALS to his nephew, John J. Van Rensselaer, demanding immediate repayment of a large loan. "The bearer shall wait your answer."
Autograph Letter signed: "Ph. Schuler", 12x8¼, 2 pages (front and verso) with integral address leaf. Albany, 1797 October 28. To John J. Van Rensselaer, in full: "Mr. Daniel Penfield has discharged the interest upon your bond and Mortgage for 3,100 pounds up to the 15th of August last. As I have urgent occasion for a sum of money at present I request you to discharge the principal and interest due on your and Col. Henry J. Van Rensselaer's bond to me without delay. Please inform me of the day (which I expect will be an early one) on which you will call and discharge that debt that I may not be [illegible phrase] when you call. The bearer shall wait your answer. I am Sir your humble servant". Philip Schuyler (1733-1804) served in the Continental Congress (1775, 1778-1781). He was one of the first four Generals appointed by the Congress. Made a scapegoat by rival general Horatio Gates for the fall of Fort Ticonderoga to the British, he was relieved of command before the Battle of Saratoga. A court martial demanded by Schuyler vindicated him, but he resigned his commission in 1799. In 1784, he was one of three patriots named to a commission to select a site for the federal capital. He was one of New York's first two U.S. Senators (1789-1791, 1797-1798). Schuyler was the father-in-law of Alexander Hamilton, and Schuyler's loss of his Senate seat to Aaron Burr in 1791 was one of the first conflicts between Hamilton and Burr. This rift would later result in Hamilton's fatal duel with Burr in 1804, only months before Schuyler's death. The Schuylers and Van Rensselaers, two of New York's wealthiest and most powerful families descended from early Dutch settlers. No family sentiments softened the tone of Schuyler's call on this mortgage, however. Perhaps there was a family rift here which would interest biographers. Half a century later, complications arising from this mortgage resulted in a US Supreme Court case, Van Rensselaer v. Kearney (1850). Three vertical 2 horizontal fold creases. Toned and creased. Multiple notches around edges. Edges lightly ragged and corners creased and chipped. Soiled paper seal on verso. Otherwise fine condition.

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