loading..

MAJOR GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK - MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED 11/17/1880 - HFSID 30322

WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK He thanks a letter writer for a story about Ream's Station, a battle considered Hancock's worst defeat in the Civil War. Manuscript Letter signed: "Winfield Scott Hancock", 2 pages (integral leaf), 5x8. Governor's Island, New York Harbor, 1880 November 17. To Clare T. Barr, Esq.

Sale Price $720.00

Reg. $900.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
PSA / JSA Authentication Guarantee
Free U.S. Shipping
Chat now or call 800-425-5379

WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK
He thanks a letter writer for a story about Ream's Station, a battle considered Hancock's worst defeat in the Civil War.
Manuscript Letter signed: "Winfield Scott Hancock", 2 pages (integral leaf), 5x8. Governor's Island, New York Harbor, 1880 November 17. To Clare T. Barr, Esq., Leadville, Colorado, in full: "It was a great pleasure to me to receive your cordial note of the 7th instant, in which you relate the incident which occurred at Ream's Station. My time is so taken up by many pressing matters, that this acknowledgement must necessarily be brief. Thanking you for your friendly letter and with best wishes I am very truly yours". Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886), a highly successful Union Corps commander during the Civil War and a hero of the Battle of Gettysburg (1863), was the Democratic Party's candidate for President in 1880, losing very narrowly to James A. Garfield by a margin of fewer than 40,000 votes out of 9 million cast. (The Electoral Vote margin was wider, but far from a landslide: 214-155.) Hancock was Commanding General of the U.S. Army's Department of the East, headquartered on Governor's Island, from 1877 until his death. Commodore John H. Upshur (1823-1907), later an admiral, had served the Union on blockade duty and assaults on coastal fortifications during the Civil War. On wonders whether Hancock was genuinely pleased to be reminded of the Second Battle of Reams Station (August 15, 1864), in which Hancock's forces, attempting to disrupt a Confederate rail line serving Richmond, were soundly beaten by a Confederate force under General A. P. Hill. Hancock did show his usual bravery in the battle, racing from point to point on horseback in an attempt to rally his men. But according to Hancock's chief of staff, Col. Charles Morgan, "The agony of that day never died for that proud soldier who, for the first time, saw his lines broken and his guns taken." Two horizontal folds. Lightly creased. Lightly worn. Slightly worn. Otherwise, fine condition.

This website image may contain our company watermark. The actual item does not contain this watermark

See more listings from these signers
Make an offer today and get a quick response
Check your account for the status.

Following offer submission users will be contacted at their account email address within 48 hours. Our response will be to accept your offer, decline your offer or send you a final counteroffer. All offers can be viewed from within the "Document Offers" area of your HistoryForSale account. Please review the Make Offer Terms prior to making an offer.

If you have not received an offer acceptance or counter-offer email within 24-hours please check your spam/junk email folder.

 

World-Wide Shipping

Fast FedEx and USPS shipping

Authenticity Guaranteed

COA with every purchase

Questions Answered 24/7

Contact us day or night

Submit Offers

Get a quick response