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MARGARET MITCHELL - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 12/15/1944 - HFSID 55648

The author congratulates friend and fellow author Edwin Granberry about his new comic strip: "We hope it makes the Granberrys so nasty rich that all they can talk about is the awfulness of the income tax laws." Typed Letter signed: "Margaret", 1p, 7¼x10½.

Price: $2,800.00

Condition: Slightly creased, otherwise fine condition Add to watchlist:
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MARGARET MITCHELL
The author congratulates friend and fellow author Edwin Granberry about his new comic strip: "We hope it makes the Granberrys so nasty rich that all they can talk about is the awfulness of the income tax laws."
Typed Letter signed: "Margaret", 1p, 7¼x10½. Atlanta, Georgia, 1944 December 15. On personal letterhead to Mabel and Edwin (Granberry). In full: "How much we wish we were preparing to fill up the tank and start to Winter Park to see you this Christmas. We had dinner with Jean and Julian Harris recently and just hearing them talk about the Granberrys made us even more restive. We'll be thinking about you this Christmas and hoping that next year the war will be over. Of course we could come to see you even now, but we have heard so many heart-rending stories from our friends in the service who could not have their families in Florida because of the damned tourists that we do not want to have than on our conscience. Edwin, in your last letter you made muttering noises about perhaps getting up this way this year. We hoped to hear from you about this and we are still hoping. Should you rally decide to come, give us plenty of warning. It took us eight weeks to get hotel reservations for New York friends who have just been here. Now that the football season is over, it may not be so difficult. John and I were so pleased about the comic strip and the probability of a radio sale. We hope it makes the Granberrys so nasty rich that all they can talk about is the awfulness of the income tax laws. I think it is wonderful for you to be doing something that gives you [handwritten insertion: "added"] pleasure and satisfaction [handwritten insertion: "+ more money"] Speaking of comic strips, I was talking of your venture with Susan Myrick, my friend on the Macon Telegraph. She asked me to ask you for this information: a young Macon service man wants to know how he should go about trying to sell his comic strip, which, I believe, is something like the 'Sad Sack,' except it's about a sailor. There is no script or plot, only situations. Sue asked me to ask you if he should get an agent, and if so, who? Or should he contact a syndicate such as King Features, and who is the cartoon man at King Features? Love to you all and kiss all the boys for me unless they have gotten too old to be kissed. [signature] P.S. If Edwin junior is ever stationed in this neighborhood, tell him to let us know."  MARGARET MITCHELL MARSH (1900-1949), a native of Atlanta, Georgia, was awarded the 1937 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction for Gone With the Wind, her epic novel set against the backdrop of the American Civil War and Reconstruction South. At first uncertain about her book's literary merit, she had submitted her manuscript to Macmillan Company in 1935. Mitchell was stunned -- and thrust into the public spotlight -- when the book sold over 1.3 million copies in its first year. It remained on the best-seller list for 21 weeks, enjoying a resurgence in sales with the release of the 1939 film based on the novel. EDWIN GRANBERRY, a freelance book reviewer and critic, had reviewed her book in a glowing and unprecedented 1,200-word piece in the New York "Evening Sun" on June 30, 1936, the day of the book's publication. Mitchell had been so impressed by the report, which compared her book to Tolstoy's War and Peace, that she had written to thank him. Her letter started a lifelong correspondence -- and a friendship between the two couples: Margaret and her husband, JOHN MARSH, and Edwin (a Southerner himself) and his wife, MABEL. Margaret and John first met the Granberrys at Blowing Rock, North Carolina, the summer campus of Florida's Rollins College, where Granberry was a Professor of English. It was during this visit that she had agreed to accept $50,000 in movie rights for her book pending contract negotiations with producer David O. Selznick (against Granberry's advice). Besides their visits to Blowing Rock, the Marshes often vacationed with the Granberrys at their home in Winter Park, Florida. Edwin Granberry, himself an author of note and a winner of the O'Henry short story prize, did begin scripting the comic strip Buz Sawyer (drawn by Roy Crane), and did so until his death. Slightly creased and soiled. Binder nicks at right edge. Otherwise, fine condition.

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