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ORVILLE WRIGHT - DOCUMENT SIGNED 04/15/1904 CO-SIGNED BY: WARREN HALLOWELL, J. CARROLL CONE, ROBERT R. REINING - HFSID 295437

ORVILLE WRIGHT, J. CARROLL CONE and ROBERT REINING Pilot's license of Warren Hallowell, signed by aviation pioneer Orville Wright. Accompanying documents are signed by two other notables in early aviation history, Cone and Reining. Document signed: "Orville Wright", 4x2¼.

Sale Price $6,800.00

Reg. $8,000.00

Condition: lightly creased, otherwise fine condition
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ORVILLE WRIGHT, J. CARROLL CONE and ROBERT REINING
Pilot's license of Warren Hallowell, signed by aviation pioneer Orville Wright. Accompanying documents are signed by two other notables in early aviation history, Cone and Reining.
Document signed: "Orville Wright", 4x2¼. Pilot's license #257 for 1927, issued to "Warren Hallowell", who has also signed it. (Wright has not signed in an official capacity.) Accompanied by four other documents related to Hallowell's aviation: 1) a pilot's identification card from 1929; Signature light and in poor contrast but legible. Fine condition. 2) A 1928 pilots ticket good for a 10-mile aviation flight; Fine condition. 3) TLS from "Robert R. Reining", Assistant Director for Regulations of the Bureau of Air Commerce, Department of Commerce, dated October 9, 1936, accompanying the registration of aircraft registration; Multiple mailing folds. Staple at top left corner. Toned and lightly creased. Otherwise, fine condition. 4) Registration certificate for Hallowell's Swallow two-engine aircraft, dated November 15, 1936, signed by "J. Carroll Cone", Assistant Director of Air Commerce; Filing holes near bottom edge. Lightly toned and worn. Stained at edges. Bottom edge lightly frayed. Otherwise, fine condition. ORVILLE WRIGHT (1871-1948) and his brother, Wilbur (1867-1912), had made aviation history with their Flyer in Kitty Hawk, on North Carolina's Outer Banks, on December 17, 1903. While the Wrights had been testing their gliders on Kill Devil Hill for a number of years, that day was different. At 10:35 a.m., Orville was at the controls of the 21-foot biplane with the 40.3-foot wingspan. The 605-pound craft, powered by a 12-horsepower engine that had four piston cylinders and revved to 1,090 rpm, left the ground, staying aloft for 12 seconds and covering 120 feet at an altitude of ten feet. Later that day, during one of their three test flights, Wilbur also manned the controls, traveling 852 feet in 59 seconds. The Wright brothers were granted the first U.S. patent for the Flying Machine in May 1906. After Wilbur's death from typhoid fever, Orville sold the aircraft company in 1915, but remained an aviation elder statesman, serving for 28 years on the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the forerunner of NASA. Aviation pioneer JOHN CARROLL CONE (1891-1976) established an aerial unit for the Arkansas National Guard, which proved its worth in rescue operations during the Mississippi River floods of 1927 and 1929. He founded what later became Command-Aire, an aircraft manufacturing company. As Arkansas State Auditor and later a candidate for Governor, he toured the state in his own biplane. He was Assistant Director of the US Bureau of Air Commerce (1933-1936), remaining thereafter an aviation advisor to Presidents Roosevelt and Truman. In the year after he sent this letter to Hallowell, ROBERT R. REINING (1894-1962) achieved a degree of notoriety as Director of Regulations for the Air Commerce Bureau by insisting that Amelia Earhart could not be cleared for her round the world flight until she had been re-tested for her flight instrumentation ratings. Under pressure, he relented and allowed her to waive the written examination, perhaps a mistake given Earhart's disappearance on the ill-fated 1937 flight. Warren Hallowell (b. 1904) is representative of the American public's enthusiasm for aviation in 1927, the historic year of Lindbergh's trans-Atlantic flight in which he received his license. Note that the documentation here specifically prohibits "intentional acrobatics," a reflection not on Hallowell's flying skills but on his aircraft, a twin-engine Swallow. This was an era in which stunt flying, barnstorming and aerial races were literally soaring in popularity.

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