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OTTO A. HARBACH - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 03/27/1952 - HFSID 23222

OTTO A. HARBACH TLS as President of ASCAP, acknowledging another composer's resignation from a controversial committee, and stating prematurely that "all hatchets seem to have been buried ..." Typed Letter signed: "Otto A. Harbach", 1 page, 8x10. New York, N.Y., 1952 March 27.

Sale Price $531.25

Reg. $625.00

Condition: fine condition
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OTTO A. HARBACH
TLS as President of ASCAP, acknowledging another composer's resignation from a controversial committee, and stating prematurely that "all hatchets seem to have been buried ..."
Typed Letter signed: "Otto A. Harbach", 1 page, 8x10. New York, N.Y., 1952 March 27. On his letterhead as President of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers to Dailey Paskman, Beverly Hills, California. In full: "I received your letter and also the copy of your letter to George Hoffman with your resignation from the Lengsfelder Committee. I am glad to say we had a wonderfully peaceful meeting here in New York, and all hatchets seem to have been buried so that from now on we can perhaps go somewhere and get somewhere. Wish you might have been here. With best wishes for your continued success, I am, Sincerely yours". Writer, lyricist and composer Otto A. Harbach (1873-1963) wrote the lyrics for some 50 Broadway musical comedies, most notably The Firefly (1912-1916), No, No Nanette (1925-1926), The Desert Song (1926) and Rose Marie (1927). Larkin worked closely collaborating with such Broadway legends as Sigmund Romberg, Oscar Hammerstein, George Gershwin and Jerome Kern. A charter member of ASCAP (1914), Harbach was President of the organization from 1950 to 1953. Austrian-born lyricist Hans Lengsfelder headed a committee to review the royalty allocation formulas used by ASCAP. He proved to be highly critical of the organization for poor record-keeping and inequitable treatment of composers and lyricists. According to a Billboard magazine from 1955, Lengsfelder was waging "a one-man war against ASCAP." Whether the resignation of lyricist and producer Dailey Paskman from the Lengsfelder Committee was routine, or triggered by policy disagreements, is unclear without further research. Multiple mailing folds. Toned with corners creased. Paper clip imprint at top right corner. Otherwise, fine condition.

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