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PAUL L. ROBESON - AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED - HFSID 67275

PAUL ROBESON The African American star singer, actor and activist pens a note for a fan. Autograph note signed: "For Brian/All best to you/& thanks to your Dad/Paul Robeson", 1p, 8x10. London, 1958 September 28. Signed on verso of a mimeographed performance schedule for "Sunday Night at the London Palladium".

Sale Price $270.00

Reg. $300.00

Condition: lightly soiled
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PAUL ROBESON
The African American star singer, actor and activist pens a note for a fan.
Autograph note signed: "For Brian/All best to you/& thanks to your Dad/Paul Robeson", 1p, 8x10. London, 1958 September 28. Signed on verso of a mimeographed performance schedule for "Sunday Night at the London Palladium". Robeson was the last act before the finale, appearing for 10 minutes and 30 second. In 1958, Robeson's passport, which had been cancelled by the State Department in 1947 for his support of Communist racial policies, was reinstated. He had made his London debut in 1922. Actor and singer Paul Robeson (1898-1976), the son of a former slave, was an All-America football player at Rutgers (1917, 1918) and starred on Broadway in Show Boat in 1926, introducing "Ol Man River", the song written for him by Jerome Kern. An international star, he began his ties with the Soviet Union in 1934, when filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein invited him to Russia. Robeson was impressed with the country's equal treatment of the races and made a number of trips to the U.S.S.R., including opening 1959 with a Kremlin gala hosted by Nikita Khrushchev. His Soviet sympathies led to his being put under surveillance by the FBI in 1941 and put on the 1947 "black list" of suspected Communists, a charge that was later refuted. His "manifesto-autobiography" Here I Stand (1958) helped restore his passport, and thereafter he planned a world tour. However, ill-health and paranoia of CIA operatives (whom Robeson and his family accused of tampering with his mental stability using a CIA mind depatterning program called MKULTRA) pushed Robeson into a suicidal manic depressive state, and after attempts to end his own life, he was hospitalized. Between 1961 and 1963, he received ECT treatment in London, though with no psychotherapeutic care, his conditions only worsened. His family eventually relocated him to a Berlin hospital where he was treated. While he recovered, he lived out the remainder of his life deeply affected by his psychological trauma. Creased with folds, vertical fold at the first "o" of Robeson. Lightly soiled and ink stained. Small separation at left edge of horizontal fold. Tape remnant at lower left edge. Chipped at lower right corner. Paper clip rust stains at top right.

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