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PEARL S. BUCK - AUTOGRAPH 10/23/1965 CO-SIGNED BY: FRANKLIN CLARK FRY - HFSID 18488

PEARL S. BUCK and FRANKLIN CLARK FRY Pearl S. Buck and Franklin Clark Fry sign an album leaf. Signature: "Pearl S. Buck/October23/1965" and on verso, "Franklin Clark Frey/4 Oct. 1965". Buck's signature is above a small magazine photo of her, while Fry's is above an Oct.

Sale Price $162.00

Reg. $180.00

Condition: fine condition
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PEARL S. BUCK and FRANKLIN CLARK FRY
Pearl S. Buck and Franklin Clark Fry sign an album leaf.
Signature: "Pearl S. Buck/October23/1965" and on verso, "Franklin Clark Frey/4 Oct. 1965". Buck's signature is above a small magazine photo of her, while Fry's is above an Oct. 5, 1965 newspaper article on Fry, which includes his comments about a United Nations address by Pope Paul VI. Buck was a Presbyterian missionary from 1914 until her resignation in 1933. PEARL S. BUCK (1892-1973, born Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker in Hillsboro, West Virginia), born to Presbyterian missionaries, spent the first forty years of her life in China, the setting of many of her books. She was the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature (1938).Best known for her novels about China (including The Good Earth; 1932 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Buck wrote over 70 novels as well as biographies, an autobiography (My Several Worlds, 1954), dramas, children's literature and translations from the Chinese. FRANKLIN CLARK FRY (1900-1968, born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) was a prominent American Lutheran clergyman. Dubbed "Mr. Protestant" by Time in 1958, Fry tried to stop Christianity from breaking into small splinter groups and was instrumental in the creation of the Lutheran World Federation, the World Council of Churches and the National Council of Churches. He was elected president of the United Lutheran Church in America in 1944, which he merged with three other Lutheran bodies to form the Lutheran Church in America (LCA). The LCA had 3.3 million members and was the largest Lutheran body in the United States; more importantly, it cut across numerous European ethnic lines. He also made an appeal to his church members in 1968, the year of his death, for a "massive improvement of in the lot of Negro ghettoes" to prevent "spiraling and spreading violence"; the late 1960's were a time of massive riots, many of them racial. Lightly toned and creased. Random ink stains. Page has been torn from album on one side. Otherwise, fine condition.

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