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PRESIDENT CALVIN COOLIDGE - DIPLOMATIC APPOINTMENT SIGNED 02/26/1927 CO-SIGNED BY: JOSEPH C. GREW - HFSID 4491

As President, Coolidge appoints an Envoy Extraordinary to Hungary, the document also signed by the Acting Secretary of State (1927). Partly Printed DS: "Calvin Coolidge" as 30th U.S. President and "Joseph C. Grew" as Acting Secretary of State, 1 page, 23x19. Washington, 1927 February 26.

Price: $2,400.00

Condition: Lightly creased, otherwise fine condition Add to watchlist:
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CALVIN COOLIDGE and JOSEPH C. GREW
As President, Coolidge appoints an Envoy Extraordinary to Hungary, the document also signed by the Acting Secretary of State (1927).
Partly Printed DS: "Calvin Coolidge" as 30th U.S. President and "Joseph C. Grew" as Acting Secretary of State, 1 page, 23x19. Washington, 1927 February 26. In part: "To J. Butler Wright, of Wyoming, Greeting: Reposing special trust and confidence in your Integrity, Prudence and Ability, I have nominated and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, do appoint you Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Hungary...." 3 1/2-inch diameter white paper seal affixed at bottom left. The major international triumph of Calvin Coolidge's administration was set into motion just eight days after this document was signed. The Kellogg-Briand Pact, renouncing war as an instrument of international policy, had its beginning on April 6, when French foreign minister Aristide Briand first proposed a bi-lateral Franco-American treaty of perpetual friendship. Frank Billings Kellogg, who replaced Charles Evans Hughes as Coolidge's Secretary of State in 1925, countered with another proposal in December, seeking an international denunciation of war. The historic pact was signed on August 27, 1928 and Kellogg was awarded the 1929 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. Kellogg also negotiated treaties with 19 nations, and may have been on a diplomatic mission at the time this document was signed. The year this document was signed, Joseph C. Grew, whom President Coolidge named as Undersecretary of State in 1924, received a diplomatic appointment himself. Coolidge named Grew as Ambassador to Turkey, a position in which he served until 1932. Grewwas well qualified, having begun his career in diplomatic service in 1904. He was Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs (1918) and Minister to Denmark (1920) and Switzerland (1921). In 1923, Grew negotiated a treaty with Turkey. In 1932, President Hoover later appointed him Ambassador to Japan, a post Grew held until Pearl Harbor. He returned to serve as Undersecretary of State in FDR's administration (1944-1945). Lightly creased. Fine condition.

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