loading..

PRESIDENT FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 12/04/1924 - HFSID 285953

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT A month after John W. Davis lost to President Coolidge, 42-year-old FDR signs a typed letter to a Democratic convention delegate about uniting the Democratic Party. Important Typed Letter Signed: "Franklin D. Roosevelt", 2 pages, 8½x11, separate sheets. New York, 1924 December 4.

Sale Price $3,400.00

Reg. $4,000.00

Condition: fine condition
PSA / JSA Authentication Guarantee
Free U.S. Shipping
Chat now or call 800-425-5379

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
A month after John W. Davis lost to President Coolidge, 42-year-old FDR signs a typed letter to a Democratic convention delegate about uniting the Democratic Party.
Important Typed Letter Signed:
"Franklin D. Roosevelt", 2 pages, 8½x11, separate sheets. New York, 1924 December 4. To John M. Lindley, Winfield, Iowa. In part: "A number of acknowledged leaders of our Party have asked my opinion as to what should be done to make the Democracy a stronger and more militant organization nationally. In recent years and in many States we have succeeded in electing Democratic governors. Yet these same States we fail to carry for our presidential candidates. It is fair to reason that the Party organization is far weaker nationally than locally. Before expressing my own views as to a remedy I want the counsel and thought of representative Democrats throughout the country. Therefore I am writing to every Delegate to the recent National Convention, and I would sincerely appreciate your views, expressed as fully and frankly as may be. What you write me I will of course treat as confidential unless you expressly give me permission to quote you...Something must be done, and done now to bring home to the voting population the true basis and sound reasons why the Democratic Party is entitled to national confidence as a governing party. There is room for but two parties. The Republican leadership has stood and still stands for conservatism, for the control of the social and economic structure of the nation by a small minority of hand-picked associates. The Democratic Party organization is made more difficult by the fact that it is made up in chief part by men and women who are unwilling to stand still but who often differ as to the methods and lines of progress. Yet we are unequivocally the party of progress and liberal thought. Only by uniting can we win. It is not, I take it, a matter of personalities or candidates, but a matter of principles. If in the next three years we...devote ourselves instead to organizing for party principles, for the taking advantage of our opponents' errors and omissions, and for presenting our own logical and progressive program, we shall gain the confidence of the country; and find it far easier to choose a representative and successful ticket when the time comes. I shall greatly appreciate it if you will write me." In the November 4, 1924 presidential election, held exactly one month earlier, Republican President Calvin Coolidge defeated former Democratic Congressman and U.S. Minister to Great Britain John W. Davis by 15.7 million to 8.4 million popular votes, 382-136 electoral votes and 35-12 states. FDR's opinion that "There is room for but two parties" refers to Wisconsin Senator Robert M. LaFollette, who ran that year as the Progressive Party candidate, winning only his home state's 13 electoral votes. FDR was also upset that states such as New York and Ohio, with 45 and 24 electoral votes respectively, had Democratic Governors but voted Republican for Coolidge. Roosevelt helped unite the party and obtain the 1928 Democratic presidential nomination for New York Governor Alfred E. Smith, whom he had nominated at the convention. Smith lost to Coolidge's Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover, but four years later the Democrats regained the presidency with the election of Franklin D. Roosevelt. John M. Lindley, the addressee, had run for Congress in 1922, but lost to Republican William Kopp. Lightly creased. Light pencil erasures at upper left corner of first page. Fine condition.

This website image may contain our company watermark. The actual item does not contain this watermark

See more listings from these signers
Make an offer today and get a quick response
Check your account for the status.

Following offer submission users will be contacted at their account email address within 48 hours. Our response will be to accept your offer, decline your offer or send you a final counteroffer. All offers can be viewed from within the "Document Offers" area of your HistoryForSale account. Please review the Make Offer Terms prior to making an offer.

If you have not received an offer acceptance or counter-offer email within 24-hours please check your spam/junk email folder.

 

World-Wide Shipping

Fast FedEx and USPS shipping

Authenticity Guaranteed

COA with every purchase

Questions Answered 24/7

Contact us day or night

Submit Offers

Get a quick response