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PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON - THIRD PERSON AUTOGRAPH LETTER 03/16/1796 - HFSID 350396

GEORGE WASHINGTON As President, he sends a miniature cameo bust of himself to a lady. The original gift is framed with the President's letter and a presentation plaque. Framed collection including: 1) Autograph Letter Signed in the Third Person. As President, 1 page, 6¼x4½.

Sale Price $12,325.00

Reg. $14,500.00

Condition: fine condition
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GEORGE WASHINGTON
As President, he sends a miniature cameo bust of himself to a lady. The original gift is framed with the President's letter and a presentation plaque.
Framed collection including: 1) Autograph Letter Signed in the Third Person. As President, 1 page, 6¼x4½. No place, 1796 March 16. Signed “the President” in text. To a Mrs. Stewart, in full: "Not for the representation or the value, but because it is the production of a fair lady, the President takes the liberty of presenting the enclosed, with his best regards, to Mrs. Stewart praying her acceptance." Toned and creased. Trimmed, irregularly cut edges. Fine condition.2) Ephemera, unsigned. Framed reproduction of Madame de Brehan's miniature portrait of a Grecian style image of Washington. George Washington (1732-1799) a Virginia planter and surveyor who gained his military experience in the French and Indian War, was a delegate to the Continental Congress when he volunteered to take command of the American militia surrounding British-occupied Boston in 1775. Not a brilliant tactician, Washington turned the ragtag volunteer Continental Army, inadequately supplied by Congress, into an effective fighting force, preserving morale and winning enough battles to persuade France to enter the conflict. With victory achieved, he astonished European observers by retiring to private life instead of establishing his own monarchy.He presided at the Constitutional Convention (1787), coaxed from retirement by James Madison's argument that only he had the national prestige to assure support for the stronger national government both agreed the country needed. As President, he sought to rise above party, including both the leading Federalist (Alexander Hamilton) and Democratic-Republican (Thomas Jefferson) in his Cabinet. He again set a precedent by limiting himself to two terms. His Farewell Address, which warned against permanent alliances with foreign powers, also set an enduring precedent. Washington certainly earned the title given to him by grateful citizens, "Father of His Country." Corners of frame worn and lightly chipped. Fine condition. Framed to an overall size of 23 x 18 ½.  Not framed by the Gallery of History.






  

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