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PRESIDENT JAMES E. "JIMMY" CARTER - AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED CIRCA 1976 - HFSID 266117

JIMMY CARTER Jimmy Carter writes an autograph note on a memo to Pat Anderson. Autograph Note Signed: "J", 1p, 8½x11. No place, no date, but circa August-November 1976. To "Pat-". In full: "You did a fine job on this -

Sale Price $2,125.00

Reg. $2,500.00

Condition: lightly creased
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JIMMY CARTER
Jimmy Carter writes an autograph note on a memo to Pat Anderson.
Autograph Note Signed: "J", 1p, 8½x11. No place, no date, but circa August-November 1976. To "Pat-". In full: "You did a fine job on this -". Written at the upper right corner of a typed memo to "Governor Carter" from Pat Anderson. Carter has also written: "Yes" at lower left margin next to Anderson's asking Carter "if you would like me to ask Stu to have more detailed answers prepared by the issues staff." Anderson briefs Carter on media coverage and campaign issues. In full: "The response to the Town Hall Forum speech in the N.Y. Times, Washington Post, and Atlanta Journal was extensive and largely favorable. The coverage focused on your criticisms of Ford's vetoes, but also included long quotes from the more reflective parts of the speech. Jim Wooten's piece in the Times began: 'JC bluntly responded today to Pres Ford's recent attacks on Congress by accusing him of irresponsible, shortsighted vetoes that he said have 'contributed to needless human suffering.' Carter offered a vigorous defense of Congress, characterizing it as much more in tune with the American people than Ford. Carter presented as harsh an appraisal of Ford as has been heard from him this year. Wooten went on to quote the 'four times as negative as Nixon' line, the reference to Ford as 'an appointed President' and to say that the speech stressed the need for renewed public trust in government. Wooten said that you challenged Ford's statement that 'our long national nightmare is over' by saying in the speech that the nightmare still goes on, with the CIA and FBI revelations. Wooten went on to say that the speech was 'smoothly constructed' and well delivered, and that the text 'matched the rhythms and patterns of Carter's Southern speech. He also quoted the line about the vetoes causing needless human suffering and noted that in your delivery you deleted the reference to politicians who ride in limousines. Helen Dewar's piece led with the reference to 'an appointed Pres who is out of touch with the American people,' and called the speech a hard hitting attack on Ford. She quoted the line about choosing between govt that clings to the past or looks to the future, and about Ford's veto record being one of national neglect and negativism and fear of action, and about Ford being four times as negative as Nixon. She spoke of you invoking a 'neo-populist theme' with your remarks about giving people representation in Washington as well as the rich. She quoted the lines about politicians becoming isolated from the people, and about your having been on the receiving end of the federal bureaucracy. Several reporters commented on your not answering the question about which bills you would have vetoed and what they would have done to the budget deficit. The Republicans will probably sound that same theme - That Ford's vetoes saved twenty trillion dollars, or whatever. There are several obvious lines of reply. One is that sum totals are misleading since similar bills were vetoed several times. Another is that money invested in jobs brings revenues, invested in children prevents crime, etc. Please let me know if you would like me to ask Stu to have more detailed answers prepared by the issues staff. The general response I got from several reporters to the American Legion speech was admiration for your meeting the amnesty issue head-on." Carter had made his speech to the American Legion in Seattle, Washington on August 24, 1976. At the time of this memo, JAMES EARL "JIMMY" CARTER (born in 1924), the relatively unknown former Governor of Georgia (1971-1975), was running for election for President against incumbent President Gerald Ford, who had succeeded to the presidency upon the resignation of Richard M. Nixon in August 1974. On December 12, 1974, Carter had announced that he would begin actively campaigning following the completion of his duties as Governor on January 14, 1975. He made his first major speech in Atlanta in February 1975.The campaign began with Ford trailing by 30 percentage points, largely as a result of his angering of many Americans with his pardon of former President Nixon. At the end of the first of three Ford-Carter debates, the incumbent President had cut Carter's lead by 10 points, but Ford made a major mistake in the second debate, saying that Eastern Europe was free from Soviet domination. In the third debate, Carter, who was campaigning as an outsider intent on cleaning up Washington, apologized to the American people for granting an interview that was published in the November 1976 issue of "Playboy" magazine. Carter, in answer to a question about his religious beliefs, made reference to "lusting in his heart", angering religious supporters in the south. The interview pushed the issues to the back of the voters' minds, but Carter won a narrow victory in the election, defeating Ford by 40,825,830-39,147,770 popular votes and 297-240 electoral votes. PATRICK ANDERSON, a Washington novelist, was Carter's first speechwriter. He later authored Electing Carter: The Campaign of 1976. Lightly creased and soiled. ¼-inch tear at lower left blank edge. Overall, fine and interesting.

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