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PRESIDENT MARTIN VAN BUREN - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 01/03/1832 - HFSID 4824

MARTIN VAN BUREN He writes from London to New York's Mayor Gideon Lee, unaware that the US Senate was about to kill his ambassadorial appointment. But Van Buren would have the last laugh! Autograph Letter Signed: "M. Van Buren" as U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1p, 8x10.

Sale Price $2,380.00

Reg. $2,800.00

Condition: fine condition
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MARTIN VAN BUREN
He writes from London to New York's Mayor Gideon Lee, unaware that the US Senate was about to kill his ambassadorial appointment. But Van Buren would have the last laugh!
Autograph Letter Signed: "M. Van Buren" as U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1p, 8x10. No place, but probably London, no date, but docketed Jan. 3, 1832. To Gideon Lee Esq, Mayor. With postmarked integral leaf addressed by Van Buren to: "The Honble/Gideon Lee/New York". In full: "The pressure of my engagements has prevented an earlier attention to your request. Please to seal the enclosed after you have read it & shown it to Genl Spier. Remember me kindly to Mrs. Lee & believe me to be Very truly yours." GIDEON LEE who served as New York's Mayor from 1833-1834, had also been a member of the State Assembly (1822) and the city's Board of Aldermen (1828-1830). He served in Congress as a Jacksonian Democrat from 1835-1837, and was a presidential elector on the Democratic ticket of Van Buren and Johnson in 1840. Three weeks after Van Buren wrote this letter on January 25, 1832, the vote in the U.S. Senate to confirm his nomination as U.S. Minister to Great Britain was held. Van Buren had served as Jackson's Secretary of State until nominated by the President on June 25, 1831 and left for London to assume his duties. He was not to remain there long. The confirmation vote in the Senate was a tie and according to the U.S. Constitution, the Vice President was to cast the deciding vote. Vice President John C. Calhoun, still smarting over a critical remark Van Buren had made about the previous Adams-Calhoun administration, cast a "nay" vote and Van Buren's nomination was rejected. Van Buren had to leave London and return to the United States but found himself more popular than ever, even gaining support from some of his opponents, who believed his rejection by the Senate was unfair. Jackson repudiated Calhoun and at the Democratic Party Convention held in Baltimore in May 1832, Jackson was renominated for President with Van Buren as his running mate. Elected Vice President in November, Van Buren now presided over the body that had rejected him. Remnants of red wax seal attached, with tiny tear on leaf from opening. Lightly shaded, light ink transference. Vertical fold touches the "a" in Van. Overall, fine condition.

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