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RAMON CARDONA - DOCUMENT SIGNED 10/01/1863 - HFSID 273028

A UNION FIRST LIEUTENANT RECORDS CASUALTIES SUFFERED DURING THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG   CIVIL WAR, UNION: RAMON CARDONA. Partly Printed DS: "Ramon Cardona" as First Lieutenant, Commanding the Company, 1p, 24x10, folded into thirds. Bivouac near Rapidan River, 1863 October 1.

Sale Price $1,190.00

Reg. $1,400.00

Condition: lightly creased, lightly soiled
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A UNION FIRST LIEUTENANT RECORDS CASUALTIES SUFFERED DURING THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG
 
CIVIL WAR, UNION: RAMON CARDONA. Partly Printed DS: "Ramon Cardona" as First Lieutenant, Commanding the Company, 1p, 24x10, folded into thirds. Bivouac near Rapidan River, 1863 October 1. Headed: "QUARTERLY RETURN of Deceased Soldiers of Company "I" of the Fourteenth Regiment of New York State Militia, for the Quarter ending the "Thityeth" (sic) day of September 1863." The names of two privates, William S. Millard and George McConnell, are listed. Docketed on verso in unknown hand. The 14th New York State Militia was recruited in Brooklyn and mustered into service between May-August 1861. The unit's companies left the state on May 18, 1861, except for Companies I and K, which left for the war in July 1861. The 14th New York, which became the New York 84th Infantry, participated in a number of battles, including Bull Run, General Pope's campaign in Virginia, Antiteam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, before joining in the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), where the two men listed on this document received the gunshot wounds that resulted in their deaths. Millard died on the battlefield and McConnell, who had his left arm amputated, died on July 8, 1863 at Seminary Hospital, Gettysburg. Both are buried at the National Cemetery at Gettysburg. Following the Battle of Gettysburg, the 14th New York fought at Wilderness and Spotsylvania before being mustered out on June 6, 1864. Over the course of the war, the 14th New York suffered a number of casualties, including eight officers and 218 enlisted men.Ramon Cardona had enlisted as a Private on April 18, 1861 in Brooklyn. Mustered into Company H of the New York 84th Infantry on April 23, 1861, he was promoted to Sergeant on July 15, 1861. Cardona transfered to Company I on February 26, 1862. Entering the company as a Second Lieutenant (not commissioned), he was promoted to First Lieutenant on August 29, 1862. After the war, Cardona was a member of the Fourteenth Brooklyn War Veterans Association, which later erected a monument to the unit. Lightly creased with folds. One-inch tear at blank left margin and ½-inch tear at blank right margin at lower horizontal fold, 1¼- and ¼-inch separations at upper blank margin at vertical folds, 1¾-inch separation at lower margin at vertical fold touches two words of writing (all paper intact). ¾-inch hole and 1-inch tear at lower portion of document at lower horizontal fold. Lightly shaded at folds on verso (minor show through). Lightly soiled, minor foxing. Writing on docket lightly shows through at writing for "Cause of Death". Overall, fragile condition.

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