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RAY MILLAND - AUTOGRAPH CO-SIGNED BY: PAULETTE GODDARD, SYLVIA SIDNEY, HEDY LAMARR, BRIAN AHERNE, CHARLES BOYER - HFSID 54452

RAY MILLAND, PAULETTE GODDARD, CHARLES BOYER, SYLVIA SIDNEY, HEDY LAMARR and BRIAN AHERNE This page is signed by six Hollywood actors. One of these signers (Milland) would go on to win an Oscar, while four of the other five (Goddard, Boyer, Sidney and Aherne) would be nominated.

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RAY MILLAND, PAULETTE GODDARD, CHARLES BOYER, SYLVIA SIDNEY, HEDY LAMARR and BRIAN AHERNE This page is signed by six Hollywood actors. One of these signers (Milland) would go on to win an Oscar, while four of the other five (Goddard, Boyer, Sidney and Aherne) would be nominated. The page appears to be part of a program or flyer from the Hollywood Canteen, which served soldiers with free food and entertainment during World War II Signatures: "Hedy Lamarr", "Paulette Goddard", "Ray Milland", "Sylvia Sidney", "Brian Aherne" and "Charles Boyer", 5½x8¼ piece of paper. This appears to be a program page or flyer from the Hollywood Canteen, which operated at 1451 Cahuenga Boulevard in Hollywood, California between 1942 and 1945. The club offered free food, dancing and entertainment to Allied servicemen and women during World War II, many of whom later left to fight or serve overseas. The top of this page is titled "Write a Letter Home" and is otherwise blank except for a printed b/w drawing of the Canteen. RAY MILLAND (1905-1986) was a British and then American actor spent the 1930s and early 1940s playing light romantic leads in such films as Next Time We Love (1936); Three Smart Girls (1936); Easy Living (1937), in which he was especially charming opposite Jean Arthur in an early Preston Sturges script; and as the major in Billy Wilder's The Major and the Minor (1942), opposite Ginger Rogers. Milland won an Oscar for his intense and realistic portrait of an alcoholic in The Lost Weekend (1945). In Dial M for Murder (1954), directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Milland convincingly portrays a wastrel husband who schemes to have his wife (Grace Kelly) murdered for the insurance. His later career was made up of mediocre parts in mostly bad films. PAULETTE GODDARD (1911-1990) was an American actress. A former teen Broadway chorus girl, she first attracted attention when she was featured reclining on a prop crescent moon in the 1928 Ziegfeld musical, Rio Rita. Goddard reportedly made several two-reel comedies for Hal Roach (in a blond wig) before being featured as a "Goldwyn Girl" in Eddie Cantor's film, Kid from Spain, in 1932. She shot to stardom when she was cast by Charlie Chaplin in his 1936 film, Modern Times. Goddard also won Chaplin's heart as well as the role, but there were questions as to whether the two were ever legally married, and her relationship with Chaplin cost her the one role that she truly coveted: Scarlett O'Hara in the 1939 epic, Gone With the Wind. Goddard, who was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for So Proudly We Hail (1943), also appeared in such films as The Great Dictator (1940) and Reap the Wild Wind (1942) before making her final film, the French/Italian movie Gli Inderrenti (Time of Indifference), in 1964. She was coaxed out of retirement for a made-for-TV movie, The Snoop Sisters, in 1972. CHARLES BOYER (1899-1978) was a suave leading man who played opposite some of his era's most glamorous film stars, including Greta Garbo and Ingrid Bergmann. He was nominated four times for a Best Actor Academy Award: Conquest (1937), Algiers (1938), Gaslight (1944) and Fanny (1961). Boyer (1899-1978, born in Figeac, Lot, Midi-Pyrénées, France) was a suave leading man who played opposite some of his era's most glamorous film stars, including Greta Garbo and Ingrid Bergmann. He was nominated four times for a Best Actor Academy Award: Conquest (1937), Algiers (1938), Gaslight (1944) and Fanny (1961). SYLVIA SIDNEY (1910-1999) was an American actress. She was typecast as a poor but proud working girl during the Great Depression. Dissatisfied with her lack of choice in the roles she played, Sidney concentrated on stage work for the next three decades. Returning to the big screen, she was nominated for an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress in Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (1973). Later films included Finnegan Begin Again (1985) and Mars Attacks (1996). HEDY LAMARR (1914-2000), born Hedwig Kiesler, who appeared in European films beginning in the 1930s, made a big splash at age 18 in the universally-banned Czech film Ecstasy (1933). Pushing the boundaries of social norms, Lamarr was one of the first actresses to simulate an orgasm on screen. She was also shown in full-frontal nude shots several times throughout the film, which was an unusual and monumental occurrence in the socially conservative 1930s. After traveling to America, the actress was signed to a long MGM contract. Although often underused by the studios, she was memorable in the complex role of the career woman who "liberates" stuffy Bostonian Robert Young in H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1942). In 1949, Lamarr appeared opposite Victor Mature in Cecil B. DeMille's Samson and Delilah. Her last starring role was in The Female Animal (1958). Little was known about Lamarr's technological genius until recently; in 1942, she patented a frequency hopping electronic system that was used later on secret communications devices and in the building of advanced weaponry. Brilliantly intelligent and passionately anti-Nazi, Lamarr had conceived the basic idea for this technology while listening to the conversations of her first husband, an Austrian industrialist, at dinner parties with Hitler. The method she pioneered, applied by the U.S. Navy with good effect in World War II, was essential to the next generation of Wi-Fi and cell phone technology. BRIAN AHERNE (1902-1986) was a British actor who made his first U.S. appearance on the Broadway stage in The Barrets of Wimpole Street (1931). He starred opposite such leading ladies as Marlene Dietrich, Helen Hayes, Rosalind Russell and Merle Oberon and received an Oscar nomination for his portrayal of doomed Emperor Maximillian in Juarez (1939). Lightly rippled and creased. Left edge is irregular. Milland's signature is slightly smeared. Folded in quarters and unfolded. Folds are worn and have pinholes. Otherwise, fine condition.

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