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ROBERT OULD - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED 01/29/1861 - HFSID 79433

As US Attorney for the District of Columbia, he presents the findings of a Grand Jury charging two men with theft of government bonds. This was one of Ould's last official acts before he left for Richmond to join the Confederate War Department.

Sale Price $162.00

Reg. $180.00

Condition: fine condition
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ROBERT OULD
As US Attorney for the District of Columbia, he presents the findings of a Grand Jury charging two men with theft of government bonds. This was one of Ould's last official acts before he left for Richmond to join the Confederate War Department.
Autograph Document signed: "Robert Ould/U.S. Attorney", 3 pages, 7¾x12. District of Columbia, County of Washington, 1861 January 29. He reports the findings of a Grand Jury, a 2-count indictment charging Godard Bailey and William H. Russell with the theft of coupon bonds issued by the States of North Carolina, Missouri and Tennessee, in the possession of the federal government, using their positions in the Washington City government to arrange the theft. Robert Ould (1820-1882) was US Attorney for the District of Columbia until Virginia seceded from the Union (April 1861), whereupon he traveled to Richmond, volunteering his service to the Confederate Government and becoming Assistant Secretary of War (January-March 1862). In July, following an agreement among military commanders, Ould became head of the Bureau of Exchange of Prisoners, holding that office until the agreement broke down in 1864. In this office he earned the esteem of his Union counterparts as one genuinely trying to ease the plight of prisoners. Ould attempted to surrender to Union General U. S. Grant at Appomattox, but Grant declined to take him prisoner. Secretary of War Stanton later sought to indict him, on grounds that he had misappropriated funds of Union prisoners, but the charge proved groundless. Ould resumed the private practice of law. Interestingly, as US Attorney Ould had led the prosecution (1859) of Congressman (and future Union general) Daniel Sickles for the murder of his wife's lover, Philip Barton Key. Sickles was found not guilty by reason of temporary insanity, the first use of that defense, devised by Sickles' brilliant defense counsel, Edwin Stanton! Light surface creases. Corners lightly worn and creased. Lightly toned. Normal mailing folds. Faint stains on verso. Otherwise, fine condition.

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