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RUTH ROLAND - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 04/06/1933 - HFSID 317620

RUTH ROLAND Letter reporting that she suffered no damage in the Long Beach earthquake of 1933, and claims (wrongly) that the press had exaggerated the event. Autograph Letter signed: "Ruth Roland", 3 pages (integral leaf), 5¼x8¼. 1933 April 6.

Sale Price $306.00

Reg. $360.00

Condition: fine condition
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RUTH ROLAND
Letter reporting that she suffered no damage in the Long Beach earthquake of 1933, and claims (wrongly) that the press had exaggerated the event.
Autograph Letter signed: "Ruth Roland", 3 pages (integral leaf), 5¼x8¼. 1933 April 6. Accompanied by envelope addressed in her hand to Helen McDonough, West Lynn, Massachusetts, postmarked Los Angeles, California, April 6, 1933. In full: "Dear Friend: Thank you so much for your nice letter and I am happy to say we are all well and suffered not the least damage. The earthquake was greatly exaggerated and only brick buildings and those poorly constructed in the first place suffered any serious damage. It's a shame really to have the papers print such terrible stories. Please believe my dear both Lillian Conrad and myself appreciate your interest greatly whether you are a member or not, and always want you to feel we want you to join only when it is absolutely convenient. Best of thots to your mother and yourself. Fondly". Ruth Roland (1892-1932, born in San Francisco, California) was an American actress with over 210 movie credits and who, at her height, rivaled Pearl White as queen of the movie serials. She started acting at three and had her own vaudeville act by her teens. She got her start in film in 1908 after being spotted by a Kalem Company director. Her big break came with The Red Circle (1915), the first of her 11 serials. Roland reportedly made more money on real estate than acting in serials; this, plus her increasingly imperious set presence, probably caused her to leave films in favor of vaudeville. Roland made several comeback attempts - including the talkie Reno (1930) - but these were unsuccessful. She was mostly forgotten, but also independently wealthy, by her last film, From Nine to Five, in 1935. The Long Beach earthquake of March 10, 1933 was rather more serious than Roland represents in this letter, claiming the lives of 120 people. The toll would have been much greater had schools been in session, as several were badly damaged, prompting the California legislature to enact new school construction codes. W. C. Fields did take advantage of the earthquake, however, to hoax film of a shaking set of International House, in which he was starring. Normal mailing folds. Toned. Otherwise, fine condition.

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